Course Descriptions - Honors
HON122 Honors Intro to E-Portfolios (1-0-1)

This course introduces students to the concepts and implementation of e-portfolios and requires them to develop one that may serve as a model for their program-based portfolios. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Concentration

HON123 Honors College Composition (3-0-3)

This course provides a foundation in academic discourse by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing, argumentation, professional communication strategies, visual rhetoric, and service learning. In addition, the course implements e-portfolios and requires students to develop an e-portfolio that may serve as a model for their program-based portfolio that may serve as a model PR: Matriculation into the Honors Concentration

HON124 Honors English (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to literary genres, analysis, and criticism. Students analyze and interpret poetry; fiction, including a novel; drama; and literary criticism. They write critically about these genres. Credit will not be given for both HON 124 and ENG 124. PR: ENG/HON 123 and meets criteria for Honors Concentration

HON125 Honors Western Civ to 1715 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the development of Western civilization from ancient times to 1715. It focuses on political, cultural, social, and economic aspects fo the history of the West and relates these features to those of other regions of the world during the same period. The course includes significant exposure to primary sources, including the canon of philosophical, literary, artistic, and other material products of Western civilization, and requires students to inerpret these critically, using creative scholarly research. It also introduces students to historical thinking and methodology. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Program

HON144 The Shaping of the Modern World (3-0-3)

This course is a survey of the major cultural, intellectual, political, economic and social forces that have shaped the modern world since the middle of the 17th century. In addition to the general survey of modern world history, each student will select, with the assistance of the instructor, a theme applicable to the time period encompassed by the course for focused study under the instructor's guidance. Credit may be earned for both HIS 127 and HON 144. PR: Consent of department

HON234 Honors World Civ since 1700 (3-0-3)

This course surveys world civilizations since about 1700. It emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, Ociania, and the Americas. It explores the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities. It includes significant exposure to primary sources, including the canon of world literature, and requires students to interpret these critically, using creative scholarly research. It also introduces students to historical thinking and methodology. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Program

HON244 Topics in Literary Classics (3-0-3)

This course extends and refines skills of literary analysis and interpretation. It emphasizes study within a specific literary tradition, but the thematic focus of the course varies. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Program

HON250 Research Seminar (3-0-3)

This is the first course in a two-course sequence that serves as an interdisciplinary, capstone seminar for students in the Liberal Arts Honors Program. The first course introduces students to the methodologies and interpretive practices of two complementary disciplines. It considers disciplinary knowledge-making and methodologies and investigates how these disciplines might combine for a richer understanding of the topic at hand. Also, in the first semester, students develop a prospectus for an interdisciplinary research paper or project in which they hone their research and critical thinking skills. In the second semester, they complete the paper or project. The thematic focus of the capstone course varies. Course content emphasizes the relationships of knowledge in any combination of the Liberal Arts, and it provides a broad survey of the topic. The two semesters of the course are team taught by professors representing two complementary disciplines. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Concentration

HON255 Capstone Seminar (3-0-3)

This is the second course in a two-course sequence that serves as an interdisciplinary, capstone seminar for students in the Liberal Arts Honors Program. In the first semester, students develop a prospectus for a research paper or project. In the second semester, they complete the paper or project. Whereas the first course introduces students to the methodologies and interpretive practices of two complementary disciplines, this course emphasizes the practice of interdisciplinary scholarship and asks students to synthesize and integrate the disciplinary perspectives they developed in the first course. The thematic focus of the capstone course varies. Course content emphasizes the relationships of knowledge in any combination of the Liberal Arts, and it provides an in-depth study of the few texts to which students were introduced in the first semester. Professors representing two complementary disciplines team-teach both semesters. PR: HON 250

HON271 American Presidency (3-0-3)

In the course of the 20th century, the American presidency has emerged as the premier national political institution, eclipsing the Congress in both power and prestige. This course will investigate the origin and development of the presidency as the single most powerful office of national government, and explore the extent and limits of contemporary presidential power by studying the practice of various recent presidents, primarily Truman through Clinton. PR: POL 123 and permission of the department

HON281 Sociology of Power and Class (3-0-3)

This course examines stratification systems and their effects upon different groups within those systems. Emphasis is placed upon class stratification systems, but other systems such as caste and feudal are discussed as well. Early and modern theories of stratification and their origins are discussed in light of their influence on the development of sociology as a discipline. Cross cultural analysis of stratification systems is also covered. PR: SOC 121 or SOC 122 and permission of instructor or department.


Last Updated: 08/28/14 09:06pm ET
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