Course Descriptions - Physics
PHY106 Meteorology (3-0-3)

This course covers the fundamental concepts of meteorology including meteorological instruments and observation, synoptic chart interpretation, air masses, fronts, fog formation and dissipation, and severe weather. Also covered are weather reporting and forecasting and the dissemination of meteorological information. Students will be required to access and untilize the World Wide Web to review and formulate web-based weather strategies. PR: One year of high school science

PHY120 Physical Science I (3-0-3)

This is one of a two-course sequence for the non-science major designed to provide an overview of the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth science and space science. It covers the fundamentals of physics and space science; topics include the concepts of force, motion, energy, electricity, light, formation of the solar system, lifecycle of stars and classification of galaxies. In addition, the course will focus on the development and application of the scientific method, the relationships among the various physical sciences and the role of physical science in interpreting the world around us. Knowledge of basic algebra and mathematical skills is required. Conceptual understanding of physical principles will be stressed rather than their mathematical interpretations. PR: Two years of high school math

PHY121 Physical Science II (3-0-3)

This is one of a two-course sequence for the non-science major designed to provide an overview of the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth science and space science. It covers the fundamentals of chemistry and earth science; topics include the atomic nature of matter, states of matter, changes of state, chemical reactions, the rock cycle, how chemical elements are cycled, the atmosphere and hydrosphere. In addition, the course will focus on the development and application of the scientific method, the relationships among the various physical sciences and the role of physical sciences in interpreting the world around us. Knowledge of basic algebra is required. Conceptual understanding of physical principles will be stressed rather than their mathematical interpretations. PR: Two years of high school math

PHY153 Physics I (3-3-4)

This course uses algebra, trigonometry and geometry to describe forces, kinematics, dynamics, and conservation laws. The following topics are covered: translation motion, torque, friction, projectile motion, momentum, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, sound and thermodynamics. Vector algebra will be used extensively. This course cannot be used toward the Math/Science or Computer Science degree. PR: MAT 129 F

PHY154 Physics II (3-3-4)

This course is the second part of a one-year sequence. It uses algebra, trigonometry and geometry to describe fluids, electricity, magnetism, and optics. The following topics are covered: fluids at rest, electric force and field, potential, capacitance, current, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic force and fields, AC currents reflection, refraction, mirror lenses and gratings. This course cannot be used toward the Math/Science or Computer Science degree. PR: MAT 129 or higher S

PHY221 College Physics I (3-3-4)

The course uses a calculus-based problem solving approach to describe kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws and sound. The following topics are covered: force, friction, translational and rotational motion, torque, momenta, periodic motion and sound. PR or CR: MAT 180 F

PHY222 College Physics II (3-3-4)

The course is the second part of a one-year sequence. It uses a calculus-based problem solving approach to describe electricity, magnetism, induction, and optics. The following topics are covered: electric force and field, Gauss's Law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current, resistance and EMF, DC circuits, magnetic force and field, electromagnetic induction, AC circuits, geometric optics and wave optics. PR/CR: MAT 181 PR: PHY 221 S

PHY223 College Physics III (3-3-4)

This course introduces the concepts of quantum mechanics. Students study mechanical vibrations and non-dispersive and dispersive waves in classical physics. This course includes the study of the special theory of relativity, the wave nature of particles, and Schroedinger's wave equation. This course incorporates the application of principles of quantum mechanical ideas to the structure of atoms, molecules and solid state matter. PR: PHY 222 CR: MAT 240

PHY224 Thermodynamics & Stat Mech (3-0-3)

This course introduces thermodynamics and statistical mechanics. This course covers the lawsw of thermo- dynamics and their applications particularly to nanoscale systems, entropy, chemical potential, phase equilibria, surfaces and interfaces, microscopic atomic and molecular properties, ensembles, and the three distribution functions in statistical mechanics (Maxwell-Boltzmann, Fermi-Dirac, and the Bose-Einstein). PR: PHY 223


Last Updated: 08/27/14 09:06pm ET
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