Course Descriptions - All Disciplines
FYS100 First Year Seminar (1-0-1)

This course introduces students to strategies and college resources that enhance their success as college students. The course focus is on developing academic and personal skills, setting goals, and exploring discipline-specific topics.

ACC111 College Accounting (3-0-3)

This course concentrates on the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) applied to a sole proprietorship. Topics include: analyzing, journalizing and posting transactions, adjusting entries, completion of the work sheet, financial statements, and the closing process for a service business, Accounting for Cash, Payroll Accounting and the Combination Journal are also covered.

ACC121 Financial Accounting (4-0-4)

This course introduces current procedures of financial accounting and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The course emphasizes the analysis of business transactions and the study of the accounting cycle. Topical areas in the course include accrual-based accounting concepts, internal controls; financial statement preparation; and accounting elements of a corporate business entity. An Excel-based software is utilized to practice and complete many of the problems. Ethical accounting standards are embedded throughout the course materials.

ACC122 Managerial Accounting (4-0-4)

This course introduces current managerial accounting concepts, theories and practices applicable to manufacturing, retail and service industries. Job order, process cost and activity-based cost systems are introduced. Topics include budgeting, profit analysis, product pricing and reporting concerns of decentralized operations. Students utilize an Excel-based software system to practice and complete many of the problems. Ethical issues are discussed throughout the course. PR: ACC 121

ACC123 Accounting for Decision Making - Concepts and Theory (3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to financial accounting. Emphasis is on the analysis and interpretation of financial information. Generally accepted accounting principles will be discussed throughout the course. The standard reports of financial accounting will be studied as well as the process of identifying, measuring, recording and reporting financial information. Internal control procedures, corporate assets, liabilities, and shareholders' equity will also be studied as well as reporting concerns of international companies. Interpretation and analysis of financial reports and current issues affecting these reports will be stressed. Corporate financial statements will be reviewed in and out of class via the Internet. PR: MAT 127 or equivalent F

ACC201 Computer Applications in Accounting (1-0-1)

This course provides the student with basic computer skills specific to a financial accounting environment. Topics include setting up a business entity's accounting system, recording financial transactions, and working with budget development and evaluation. Students will create invoices, create and analyze accounts receivable and payment aging reports, and develop financial statements and reports with the assistance of a software application. Students will be required to use computers to complete projects. Outside laboratory work is required. This course is pass/fail PR: ACC 111 or ACC 121 or ACC 123 S

ACC222 Intermediate Accounting I (3-0-3)

This course gives intensive consideration to financial accounting theory and the current application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). A significant amount of time is devoted to financial statement preparation and presentation. Emphasis is placed on the balance sheet and its various accounts. Topics covered include the accounting cycle, measurement of income, acquisition and disposal of assets, and the time value of money. PR: ACC 122

ACC225 Income Tax Accounting (3-0-3)

This course introduces the current income tax law and tax regulations for individuals and certain business entities. Specific tax situations are presented and analyzed in accordance with the taxation rules set forth by the Internal Revenue Code and other primary tax sources such as case law. Topics include an examination of what constitutes income, acceptable duductions, analysis of property transactions, alternative minimum taxation, and recent legislation. Individual tax forms are prepared.

ACC226 Intermediate Accounting II (4-0-4)

This course is a continuation of the study of financial accounting theory and practice. Specific accounts are examined including current and contingent liabilities, bonds, notes, corporate income taxes, leases, capital stock, pensions, and retaining earnings. Preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) are also covered. Financial statement analysis, revenue recognition rules, and accounting changes, and other topics are addressed. Excel- based web software systems re utilized in and outside of the classroom to complete assignments. PR: ACC 222

ACC242 Cost Management (3-0-3)

In this advanced course students develop an understanding of accounting information used by management in planning and controlling operations. A framework for measuring managerial performance is developed through an analytical treatment of cost behavior under dynamic conditions. Tools employed include cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting and actual and standard cost systems. PR: ACC 122

ACC246 Auditing (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to auditing for accounting students who have not had experience in auditing. The primary emphasis is on the auditor's decision- making process. Included are concepts in auditing related to determining the nature and amount of evidence the auditor should accumulate, the objectives to be accomplished in a given audit area, the circumstances of the engagement, and the decisions to be made to determine the appropriate evidence to gather and how to evaluate the evidence obtained. Ethical conduct and legal liability of auditors are also covered along with auditing within a computerized environment. PR: ACC 122

ACC248 Governmental Accounting (3-0-3)

This course surveys the theory and practice involved in accounting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. Topics include college, hospital, local government and modified accrual accounting, encumbrances and internal control. PR: ACC 121

ACC250 Accounting Internship (1-8-3)

This course provides the business/accounting student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study and field work within selected business entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience is enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate accounting or accounting related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester. PR: ACC 222, Business or Accounting major, G.P.A. of 2.5, and permission of the department S

ACC295 Internal Auditing (3-0-3)

This introductory internal auditing course examines the fundamental internal audit concepts followed by an illustration of how to conduct internal audit engagements. Topics covered include an examination of governance concepts, risk management, internal control, the procedures used by internal auditors, the assurance engagement, methods used to communicate the results, and procedures for following up. The course examines internal auditing within a computerized environment. PR: ACC 121

ATC101 Flight for Controllers (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to integrate flight and air traffic control sequences. This primary flight training includes dual instruction only in basic flight maneuvers, air traffic control procedures at controlled and uncontrolled airports, introduction to cross country procedures and air traffic control at terminal and enroute facilities. Students are introduced to navigational facilities and procedures including traffic sequencing takeoff and approach at normal and high density airports. PR: FAA Second Class Medical Certificate, proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 103; Lab Fee: $4,500

ATC110 Air Traffic Basics (3-0-3)

This course covers the knowledge areas for a Control Tower Operator Certificate. Subjects covered include: a review of the ATC System and the National Airspace System, aircraft separation minima requirements, fundamentals of radar, introduction to FAA orders and manuals (7110 manual), Letters of Agreement, Search and Rescue Operations, Pilot/Controller Glossary and mandatory phraseology, stripmaking and clearance requirements. Students will be required to complete the FAA Control Tower Operator's Exam in order to continue in subsequent ATC program laboratories. PR: AER 103 and ATC 101 or AER 101 CR: AER 140

ATC200 Ground Control (3-0-3)

This course covers the required knowledge for ground and clearance delivery controllers. Students will learn aircraft recognition features and performance material, airport utilization and console instruments specific to ground control and clearancce delivery. Students will be exposed to and determine best course of action procedures for handling emergency and unusual situations as a function of the ground control position. PR: ATC 110 CR: ATC 205

ATC205 Ground Control Laboratory (0-6-2)

This course is an application of the knowledge information gained in ATC 110 and ATC 200 through a laboratory setting for control of aircraft during ground operations. Students will gain experience through the use of low fidelity training simulation, observation of ground control and clearance delivery operators and hands-on, over-the- shoulder aircraft control. Students will be required to utilize knowledge of the air traffic system, proper terminology and phraseology in all facets of aircraft control during taxi, clearance and ground operations. PR: ATC 110 and FAA Second Class Medical Certificate CR: ATC 200; Lab Fee: $2,000

ATC250 Local Control (3-0-3)

This course covers the required knowledge for local tower controllers. Students will learn VFR and IFR separation rules and apply rules to separating departing and arriving aircraft in visual and instrumental conditions, VFR on-top and special VFR conditions. Students will learn helicopter and special flight operations for numerous aircraft types and configurations. Students will apply weather theory and instrumentation to the various effects on inflight aircraft including LLWSAS, runway condition advisories and hazardous weather advisories. Students will be introduced to primary and secondary radar tower equipment. PR: ATC 200 and ATC 205 CR: ATC 255

ATC255 Local Control Laboratory (0-6-2)

This course is an application of the knowledge gained in ATC 250 through a laboratory setting for control of aircraft during flight operations. Students will gain experience through the use of low fidelity training simulation, observation of flight control operators and hands-on, over- the-shoulder aircraft control. Students will be required to utilize knowledge of the air traffic system, proper terminology and phraseology in all facets of aircraft control during VFR and IFR departure and arrival operations. Upon completion of this laboratory, students will have gained the experience to complete a Control Tower Operator-Facility Rating at the Schenectady County Airport. PR: ATC 200 and ATC 205 CR: ATC 250; Lab Fee: $2,500

ATC260 Enroute Control (2-0-2)

This course is a study of the required knowledge for Enroute Control Operations. Students will be introduced to subject areas involving a career in the FAA as an air traffic controller. Subjects covered include: a review of the ATC System and the National Airspace System, airway facilities, role of the air traffic controller, locations and office facilities. Students will gain insight into entry level positions within the FAA and training at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City, OK. Students will be exposed to primary and secondary radar control operations including DBRITE radar indicator tower equipment. Students will gain strategies for satisfactorily completing the FAA entrance exam (Air Traffic Selection and Training AT-SAT test). PR: ATC 200 CR: ATC 250

AET110 Introduction to Wind Power Technology (3-0-3)

Topics include wind characteristics, wind energy resources, the yaw orientation system, the mainframe, the tower structure, the supporting foundation, and the control system for the wind turbine. The principle subsystems of the wind turbine will be studied. These include the blades, the supporting hub, the rotating parts such as the shafts, gearbox, coupling, mechanical brake, and the generator. The integration of wind turbines into the power system and wind-energy systems' economics will also be addressed.

AET112 Introduction to Storage Battery Technology (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to storage battery technology. Topics include electrochemistry (oxidation- reduction reactions), simple voltaic cells with aqueous electrolytes, primary or non-rechargeable batteries, and secondary or rechargeable batteries. This course focuses on the Zebra nickel-sodium chloride battery to be manufactured by General Electric in Schenectady, including the chemistry, cell characteristics, and in particular the ceramic electrolyte, electric data, energy density, capacity retention and cycle life of the Zebra battery. PR: CHM 113 or higher

AET114 Introduction to Solar Power Technology (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to solar power technology. Topics include diffuse and intermittent sources of sunlight, the conversion of sunlight into electricity using the physics of the photoelectric effect in photovoltaic cells, the integration of solar power plants into the electrical grid and solar energy systems' economics. This course includes the study of crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, silicon wafer photovoltaic cells, amorphous thin-film silicon photovoltaic cells, dye-sensitized organic semiconducting solar cells, semiconducting polymer/metal oxide photovoltaic cells, polymer photovoltaic diodes and nano solar cells. PR: CHM 113 or higher

AET116 Introduction to Fuel Cell Technology (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to fuel cell technology. Topics will include the operating features of a fuel cell, the underlying thermodynamics and physical factors that determine their performance, and the integration of the fuel cell itself with other key components such as fuel processing, heat exchange, power conditioning and control systems. Six main types of practical fuel cells will be discussed-the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), the alkaline electrolyte fuel cells (AFC), the direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), the phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC), the molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC), and the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The progress of the development of hydrogen fuel cells and the problems involved in producing and storing hydrogen will also be discussed.

AET118 Lean Manufacturing (1-0-1)

This course will utilize TPS (The Toyota Production System) for implementation of Lean Manufacturing. Using 5S and Standard Work, students will study the importance of establishing visual management to enable the recognition of abnormal conditions (defects), so that they can be addressed and resolved. In addition, students will learn about kaizen (continuous improvement) and a problem solving approach (PDCA) involving all employees with the ultimate goal of supplying the right part, in the right quantity with the right quality, at the right price, and at the right time. Some classes may be held at the Schenectady GE plant.

AET210 Power Generation (3-0-3)

This course examines the generation of electrical energy by renewable energy sources. This course details the principles of operation of the two main classes of generators used extensively in wind power systems: the synchronous generator and the asynchronous or induction generator. The generation of direct current by photovoltaic cells and fuel cells is also discussed. PR: ELT 121

AET272 Power Transmission (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to the methods by which alter- nate generated power is transmitted and distributed to the consumer using the existing power grid. The connection of electrical transformers, wind turbines, and photovoltaic cells to the electrical grid will be discussed. Examples will be taken from systems used by General Electric. PR: AET 210

ASL121 Elementary American Sign Language I (3-0-3)

As the first half of the one-year sequence in elementary American Sign Language (ASL), this course introduces students to the process and structure of the language and provides basic skills necessary to use the language. Students' expressive (signing) and receptive (comprehension) skills are enhanced by an understanding of Deaf Culture. A minimum of five hours of additional ASL practice as prescribed by the instructor is required. The course is designed for beginners.

ASL122 Elementary American Sign Language II (3-0-3)

As the second half of the one-year sequence in Elementary American Sign Language (ASL), this course continues the study of the processes and basic structures of ASL to provide higher level skills to use the language more fluently. Students' expressive (signing) and receptive (comprehension) skills are enhanced by a deeper understanding of Deaf Culture. A minimum of five hours of additional ASL practice as prescribed by the instructor is required. PR: ASL 121

ANT121 Cultural Anthropology (3-0-3)

This course explores kinship, marriage, family, political, religious and economic organization in cross- cultural perspective. The concentration is on historical development, theoretical perspectives, basic concepts and methodology of cultural anthropology with an emphasis on non-Western societies.

ART127 Introduction to Watercolors (2-2-3)

This foundational painting course includes segments of both lecture-demonstration and laboratory. Lectures include topics on the history of watercolors and its relationship to the history of art. Sessions facilitate the student's exploration of fundamentals such as observation, composition, color theory, the basic techniques in watercolor, as well as working from still life, landscape, the figure, and music. The course demonstrates and incorporates design fundamentals, and personal expression is strongly encouraged.

ART128 Introduction to Drawing (2-2-3)

This course includes segments of lecture, demonstration, and laboratory. It includes lectures on the history of drawing and its relationship to the history of art. It facilitates student development of basic drawing techniques through the exploration of fundamentals such as observation, composition, color theory, perspective, as well as working from still life, landscape, the figure, and music. The course incorporates the demonstration of design fundamentals on a weekly basis. It strongly encourages personal expression.

ART129 Two-Dimensional Design (2-2-3)

This foundation course introduces students to the basic theory and practice of two-dimentional design. It emphasizes an understanding of two-dimentional design concepts and explores the elements and value of concept, image, expression, visual problem solving, and studio practice. PR: ART 127 or 128 or evidence of studio art in high school

ART133 Appreciation of Art-Painting (3-0-3)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the history of the visual arts and to help them develop an understanding and appreciation of artistic creativity. Various examples of painting, print-making, and drawing from Western other cultures such as African, South American, and Indo-Chinese will be analyzed in order to promote an awareness of different approaches to these media, forms, and content. No background in art or formal art history is necessary.

ART135 Appreciation of Art-Sculpture and Architecture (3-0-3)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the spatial arts of sculpture and architecture and to develop in them an appreciation of artistic creativity as it applies to these art forms. An examination will be conducted of cross-cultural influences among architectural styles such as Moorish on early Renaissance, Greek on Roman, etc. Sculpture is analyzed as an independent art form in order to help the student develop an awareness of the variety of media, form, content, and style. No background in art or formal art history is necessary.

ART199 Art Indep Study (6-0-6)



AST123 Exploring Space (3-0-3)

This course examines present and future methods of space exploration. Topics include the basic science, instruments, technology, dangers, benefits, costs, and practical and political importance of space exploration. Discussion topics include space stations, moon colonies, manned missions from Mercury through Apollo, and current international space missions. PR: Two years of high school mathematics OR MAT 128

AST125 Solar System (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the modern exploration of the solor system. Topics include the evolution and characteristics of the major planets, moons, and numerous minor planets of the solar system, solar and lunar eclipses, seasons, lunar phases and astronomical folklore. PR: Two years of high school mathematics OR MAT 128 F

AST127 Cosmic System (3-0-3)

This one-semester course introduces students to the scientific study of the cosmic system. Emphasis is placed on the evolution, life cycle and characteristics of the stars and galaxies. Information from recent discoveries by the Hubble telescope and other 21st century NT telescopes is presented. Other discussion topics include constellation identification, space travel, life in the universe, and cosmology. PR: Two years of high school mathematics OR MAT 128 S

AER101 Introduction to Flight Labratory (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to acquire a Private Pilot's license, Aircraft, SEL certificate. The primary flight training includes dual and solo flight time to meet the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) practical testing standards in such training as basic flight maneuvers, takeoff and landing, night flying and cross-country procedures. Minimum FAA flight training hours apply and students will, in most cases, exceed those minimum hours in order to meet practical test standards. Completion of the FAA knowledge exam is required for this certificate. PR: FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate Recommended, Homeland Security Administration Background Requirements. Students must be eligible for ENG 123 and 100-level Math course. PR/CR: AER 103

AER102 Aviation History (3-0-3)

This course provides a general description of the entire field of aviation starting with the early achievements of flight and progressing through the various milestones to the present age. This course contains an overview of the governmental involvement with the aviation industry from establishing the postal routes, safety regulation, airline subsidies, through deregulation of the airline industry. This course includes the contributions to aviation by women, minorities and other cultures. The introduction and development of power flight, from Zeppelins, Flying Boats, through the Boeing 777, and the X-30 Oriental Express and beyond is also explored. An extended field trip will be made to either the Curtis Air Museum in Hammondsport, N.Y. or the Rhinebeck Aerodrome, Rhinebeck, N.Y., to see aircraft from the early years of flight. F

AER103 Introduction to Flight (4-0-4)

This course provides a stuent with the fundamental concepts necessary to successfully complete the FAA Private Pilot Knowledge Exam. Subject areas included in this course are: theory of flight, basic aerodynamics principles, single-engine land airplane, operation/systems/performance, navigation, flight computer computations, communications, publications, regulations and basic emergency procedures. PR: Students must be eligible to enroll in ENG 123 and a 100-level Math course

AER140 Elements of Instrument (4-0-4)

This course is a study of the instrument flying techniques and procedures in conjunction with modern, ILS, VOR, ADF, GPS and radar facilities. The course includes the study of basic attitude instrument flying, instrument navigation procedures, holding, precision and non- precision approach and departure procedures and macro- and micro-meteorology analysis. Students are provided with the information necessary to complete the FAA Instrument Rating Knowledge Exam. PR: AER 103 or equivalent

AER141 Elements of Instrument Lab (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single-engine aircraft and an approved flight training device to acquire an Instrument Rating, Aircraft, SEL. The primary instrument flight training includes dual flight time to meet the FAA practical testing standards in such training as attitude instrument flying, departure, en route and approach procedures in the instrument flight environment, instrument night flying, and cross-country procedures. Minimum FAA flight training hours apply and students will, in most cases, exceed those minimum hours in order to meet practical test standards. Completion of the FAA knowledge exam is required for this certificate. PR: AER 101 and 103 or equivalent Private Pilot Certificate, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended); proof of US citizenship or of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 140 Lab Fee: $8,200.00

AER150 Airport Management and Security (3-0-3)

This course familiarizes students with the fundamental components of a typical commercial airport and its multi-level security requirements. In addition to a commercial airport's various support functions, the organizational structure, governing FAA regulations, inter-agency relationships and management challenges are examined. Security issues are presented in a post 9/11 environment to include scenario-based discussions and problem-solving situations.

AER199 AER Independent Study (3-0-3)



AER200 Commercial Operations (3-0-3)

This course is a study of the required knowledge for a Commercial Pilot's license. Subjects covered in this course include: advanced aerodynamics, advanced aircraft systems, physiology, emergency procedures and planning, flight safety, and aeronautical decision making. There is a focus on crew resource management and flight safety operations to include Part 91 and Part 135 regulations and operations. Students will receive an instructor endorsement for the Commercial Pilot Knowledge Exam at the completion of the course requirements for an airplane-SEL. PR: AER 103 or equivalent

AER210 Aviation Law (3-0-3)

This course covers the history of aviation law, federal regulation of air transportation with special attention to ecological aspects of aircraft noise and pollutants and the role of state and federal government in aviation law, including functions of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Terminal Security Administration. PR: AER 103 or permission of the department

AER214 Physiology of Flight (3-0-3)

In this course students will study the physical effects of flight on the human body including a discussion of the following: cockpit resource management, effects of high altitude flight, G-forces, alcohol and drugs, including OTC and illicit, "IMSAFE" requirement of every pilot for the safety of themselves as well as other persons, passengers and property, and FAR Part 37 Medical disqualifications. PR: AER 103 or permission of the department

AER228 Commercial Operations Lab I (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical fight experience in a single engine aircraft toward the FAA cross-country requirement to obtain a Commercial Pilot Certificate. This course alone will not complete all requirements for the commercial certificate. Students will gain flight experience in day and night cross-country both dual and solo. Students will be introduced to the crew resource management concept, function and practical use of standard operating procedures, minimum equipment lists and commercial flight operations (Part 135 and Part 121) scenarios. PR: AER 140 and AER 141 or equivalent, Private Pilot with an Instrument Rating, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 200 or equivalent Lab Fee : $6,700

AER229 Commercial Operations Lab II (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with continued practical experience in crew resource management as it applies to complex and high performance aircraft. Continued use of effective communication skills are formulated and evaluated throughout this course. Students are introduced to the function and operation of advanced aircraft systems, practical experience in accelerated stalls and advanced maneuvers in order to apply aerodynamic theory. Students are trained on advanced aircraft systems including constant speed propellers and retractable landing gear, the associated emergency procedures for these systems and planning for commercial flight situations. Students completing this course in conjunction with AER 228 will receive the practical flight experience requirements necessary to complete the FAA Commercial Practical Exam and receive a Commercial Pilot Certificate, Airplane, SEL. PR: AER 200 and AER 228, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. Lab Fee: $7,200

AER232 Basic Instruction (3-0-3)

This course covers the techniques of basic flight instruction in order to become an FAA Certified Flight Instructor. Subjects covered include the fundamentals of flight instruction to prepare the student for the FAA Knowledge Exam on the Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI). Additionally, this course will analyze basic and advanced flight maneuvers, mechanics and regulations so as to prepare the student for the oral and written FAA Flight Instructor-Airplane exams. PR: AER 200

AER233 Basic Instruction Lab (0-1-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to acquire an FAA Flight Instructor Certificate-Airplane, single engine land. Students will acquire instructional knowledge of the elements of all flight maneuvers and procedures necessary for private and commercial pilot certification. Analysis of the required maneuvers includes the recognition and correction of common student errors. PR: AER 200, AER 228, AER 229 or equivalent, Commercial Pilot Certificate-Airplane, single engine land, FAA Second Class Medical Lab Fee: $3,500

AER236 Flight Safety (3-0-3)

This course introduces practical safety material, organizations and equipment necessary to conduct safe daily flight operations. All factors including weather, maintenance, equipment and human factors will be examined, with particular emphasis on critical decision making under stress conditions. Proper decision making will be based on knowledge of formal weather briefing techniques, flight plan filing, search and rescue methods, post-crash survival, aircraft maintenance programs, accident/incident reports and forms, airport rescue and firefighting, the role of the NTSB and flight safety organizations, and modern hardware (Doppler radar, HSOS, LLWSAS, TCAS, GPWS). PR: AER 103 or permission of the department

BIO110 The Human Body (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to general principles of biology through the study of the human body. Two-thirds of the course covers basic topics in scientific inquiry, chemistry, structure and function of cells and cellular processes, and one-third of the course covers topics in selected human organ systems. This course is intended for non-science majors requiring a non-lab science.

BIO111 Fundamentals of Biology (3-2-4)

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of biology with emphasis on humans. It will examine both the internal systems of humans and the relationship of humans as organisms to the physical and biotic environment. This course is designed for students in services related fields. This course does not satisfy any requirement for the Math/Science, Computer Science, or Science degrees. PR: Two years of high school science F, S

BIO112 Human Biology (3-2-4)

This course is an introduction to general principles of biology through the study of the human body. Two-thirds of the course covers basic topics in scientific inquiry, chemistry, structure and function of cells and cellular processes, and one-third of the course covers topics in selected human organ systems. The laboratory portion of the course complements lecture topics and includes dissection. PR: High School level Science or GED level science

BIO115 Current Topics in Biology (3-0-3)

This is a one-semester course which will address some of the major problems and issues in biology. Cell structure and function, the nutritional needs of cells and organisms, the universal nature of the genetic code which allows genetic engineering, the effects of pollutants and the basic concepts of ecology are among the topics which will be covered. An appreciation of the scientific method and the types of questions science can answer will be fostered.

BIO141 Biology I (3-3-4)

This first semester of a one-year course explores in depth the principles of modern biology. The development of molecular biology and its techniques will be examined, along with its impact on modern concepts of cell structure and physiology, cell reproduction, energy transfer. Genetics, including the structure and role of DNA, is examined. Changes in DNA over time, that is, evolution and adaptation, are discussed. The laboratory portion of the course consists of topics correlating with lecture and designed to lead the student into independent and/or team research and thought. There is a semester-long research project on Mendelian Genetics. PR: Three years of high school math, high school biology and chemistry (taken within the past three years) or BIO 111 or BIO 112 and CHM 113 (taken within the past two years). F

BIO142 Biology II (3-3-4)

This second semester of a one-year course explores in depth the principles of molecular, cellular, and organismal biology. Topics include the molecular basis of inheritance, evolution, population genetics, six-kingdom analysis, and the systems of the human body. The laboratory portion is designed in three parts. Part one consists of learning techniques in molecular biology. Part two involves learning characteristics of the six-kingdom system and the dissection of the fetal pig for different body systems. Part three consists of conducting a laboratory research project with a formal presentation of the results. PR: BIO 141 S

BIO149 Introduction to Biotechnology (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to biotechnology and its application in a variety of medical and scientific disciplines. Topics include the fundamental scientific principles and methods involved in recombinant DNA research and protein biotechnologies. This course also explores ethical and regulatory concerns raised with new advances in biotechnology and discusses career opportunities in the field. PR: BIO 141, MAT 118 or 148

BIO150 Intro to Biotechnology Lab (0-3-2)

This laboratory covers basic protocols and techniques essential to work as a technician in pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and related industries. Labs include basic procedures, instrumentation, solution chemistry, and performing assays. Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), Good Laboratory Practice (GLP), and Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) are covered. PR/CR: BIO 149

BIO151 Anatomy and Physiology I (3-3-4)

This is the first course of a lecture-laboratory sequence for the students of the allied health fields. The lecture topics include anatomical medical terminology, cell structure, tissues, the skin, skeletal system, muscular system and nervous system. The laboratory topics include cells, tissues, and an examination of the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Emphasis is placed on both gross and microscopic work. PR: BIO 112 or BIO 141 (taken within the past three years) and CHM 113 or CHM 121 (taken within the past three years)

BIO152 Anatomy and Physiology II (3-3-4)

This is the second course of a lecture-laboratory sequence designed for the students of the allied health fields. The lecture topics include the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, immune, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive systems, and in addition, metabolism, and fluid and electrolyte balance. The laboratory work covers the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Emphasis is placed on both gross and microscopic work. PR: BIO 151

BIO154 Introduction to Pharmacology (3-0-3)

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of pharmacology and is designed for students in nursing or other health related fields. It will examine the basic understanding of drug actions, drug absorption, bioavailability, distribution, metabolism and excretion; the administration of therapeutic drugs; drugs that affect the nervous, cardiovascular, and renal systems; drugs with actions on smooth muscle; endocrine drugs; chemotherapeutic drugs; antimicrobials; cancer chemotherapy; immunopharmacology; special aspects of pediatric, geriatric, dermatologic and gastrointestinal pharmacology. PR: BIO 151 and 152 and high school chemistry or CHM 113 or equivalent; higher level of chemistry preferred. S

BIO203 General Ecology (3-3-4)

Through lecture and laboratory experiences, this course focuses on the study of major ecological principles including: population and community biology, competition and predation, physiological ecology and adaptations, ecosystems, nutrient cycles, energy flow, and ecological succession. The ecological basis of contemporary environmental problems is examined and related to human activities. Quantitative perspectives and analysis will be used throughout. Portions of the laboratory experience will occur outside the indoor laboratory space. External laboratory exercises will take place on campus property or immediately adjacent spaces, or may involve field trips. PR: BIO 142 and CHM 121

BIO241 Microbiology (3-3-4)

This is a course in the fundamental principles of the biology of microorganisms. The topics include the morphology, physiology, and disease production capacity of microorganisms, protective mechanisms of hosts, control of microorganisms, genetic engineering and biotechnology, industrial microbiology, and microbial ecology. PR: BIO 141 or 151 or permission of the department F, S

BIO250 Biotechnology Internship (1-8-3)

This course provides direct hands-on field experience in biotechnology, medical or research laboratories. Weekly progress reports are required. A minimum of 96 hours of internship-related activities is required at the placement site. PR: BIO 150 and minimum gpa 2.5

BIO261 Cell & Molecular Biology (3-3-4)

This course covers the principles of cell and molecular biology, including structure, function, and molecular relationships amongst the components of the cell. Major topics include macromolecules, organelles, biological membranes, cell metabolism, growth and replication, energy transformation, extracellular matrix, signal transduction, organization of the genome and regulation of gene expression. PR: BIO 142 (Biology II) and CHM 121 (General Chemistry I)

BIO262 Genetics (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the aspects of modern genetics. Topics include gene structure and function, Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics, gene expression, population genetics, recombinant DNA technology, and genome analysis with emphasis on human aspects and applications. PR: BIO 141 and CHM 121

BIO263 Biotechnology Techniques (0-6-3)

This course uses the laboratory setting to explore experimental and analytical techniques used in cell biology, molecular genetics and biotechnology to gain an understanding of cell and molecular processes. The course covers biotechnology laboratory skills applicable to research and industrial settings. PR: BIO 261 (Cell & Molecular Biology)

BRG100 Bridge Math Skills (0-0-0)



BRG101 Bridge English Skills (0-0-0)



BUS106 Business of the Capital Region (3-0-3)

This course provides students with an overview of business and economic activity in the Capital Region of New York State. Topics include an overview of the Capital Region's economic history, geography, infrastructure, and recent business developments. Sources of information and analytical tools are introduced in the course for review of major business sectors in the Capital Region.

BUS113 Business Mathematics (3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the concepts of mathematics as they apply to a wide-range of personal and commercial business problems. The topics covered include how to dissect and solve word problems; fractions, decimals; banking; percents and their applications; trade and cash discounts; payroll; simple interest; compound interest and present value; installment buying; depreciation; and inventory and overhead. PR: CSS 120 or MAT 126 F,S

BUS115 Basic Keyboarding (1-0-1)

The student will learn to key the alphabetic keys using the "touch method." The student will learn the reaches to the numeric and symbol keys as well as basic formatting, proofreading, and editing techniques. The student will develop keyboarding speed and accuracy. A minimum of 20 net wpm is required. This course is offered in a time period shorter than a full semester. Additional laboratory hours are required. F, S

BUS118 Document Formatting (3-0-3)

This course uses the "touch method" in teaching the alphabetic and numeric keys. Emphasis is on formatting, proofreading, and editing techniques using Microsoft Word. Topics include letters, memoranda, reports, and tables. Standard English composition skills are covered in the production of documents.

BUS121 Business Law I (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the nature and sources of law pertaining to contracts, sales, secured transactions, bankruptcy and insurance. F, S

BUS123 Business Law II (3-0-3)

This course continues the study of law begun in Business Law I, and covers the subjects of personal and real property, bailments, agency, employment, partnerships, corporations, limited liability companies, estates and trusts. PR: BUS 121 F,S

BUS135 Advanced Document Formatting (3-0-3)

This course provides advanced document formatting using the functions of Microsoft Word. Word processing commands are applied on a variety of documents such as letters with mail merge, tables, and reports. The student will also be introduced to legal forms, graphic enhancements and meeting management. Proofreading, composition and other language arts skills are integrated and reinforced. PR: BUS 118

BUS212 Business Communications (3-0-3)

This course provides students with principles of effective communication in business, both written and oral. It focuses attention on the communication process including effective listening, writing and speaking. Topics include analysis of business letters, reports, and memos for organization of ideas, conciseness and clarity. The course also requires writing business letters, memos and messages for electronic media, writing business reports, and an oral presentation. Writing resumes and applying and interviewing for employment are also covered in this course. PR: ENG 123 (may be taken concurrently) F,S

BUS214 Disney Corp Bus Communic'ns (3-0-3)

The Disney Corporation Communication course describes how American companies communicate with key audiences, both internal and external to the corporation. Course introduces students to the communication function and how companies reach a variety of publics including customers, investors, employees, media, government agencies, and communities located in the proximity of the corporation. PR: ENG 123 (may be taken concurrently)

BUS223 Business Statistics (3-0-3)

This course provides the student with the knowledge to gather, process and present statistical data, construct frequency charts, compute measures of central tendency and standard and quartile deviations. This latter knowledge is then applied to solving business problems in sampling, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and trend analysis. PR: MAT 128 F,S

BUS250 Business Co-Op 1 (3-0-3)

Cooperative education is a learning experience which integrates the student's academic field of study with work experience in business and industry. Co-op students receive college credit for structured, on-the-job learning experiences related to their academic field and completion of an orientation. Students work 240 hours at the workplace during a 15 week period. PR: 2.5 GPA and Permission by Division

BUS251 Business Co-Op 2 (3-0-3)

This course is a continuation of the cooperation education experience. Cooperative education is a learning experience which integrates the student's academic field of study with work experience in business and industry. Co-op students receive college credit for structured, on-the-job learning experiences related to their academic field and completion of an orientation. Students work 240 hours at the workplace during a 15 week period. PR: 2.5 GPA and Permission of Division, BUS 250

BUS252 Business Plan Development (3-0-3)

This course provides aspiring entrepreneurs personalized guidance from successful business owners and advisors on the critical knowledge and skills necessary to start and grow a business. Topics include establishing a vision and mission statement, financing, legal issues, market research, diversity in the workplace, business etiquette, branding, human resources, payroll, social media, and customer service. A mandatory business plan will be developed and presented to a panel of judges. PR: MGT 242

CGM101 Intro to the Gaming Industry (3-0-3)

This course provides an overview of the historical background of gaming, including Native American gaming, and the progression of the casino from its early origin to today's modern casinos. It focuses on the various segments of the casino industry including the organizational structure of a casino. This course explores Class II and III licenses and the role that differing state and federal laws and regulations play in the operation of gaming establishments, hotels, and resort destinations.

CGM102 Casino Gaming Operations (3-0-3)

This course presents an overview of the various games offered at a standard casino. It provides an analysis of the organizational structure of the games department, the various games offered and the importance of each game as related to overall gaming operations in a casino. Topics covered include table games, slot management, internet gaming, sports book operations, keno, and race operations. Also covered are cage operations, casino accounting, and terminology used in the industry.

CGM103 Gaming Reg Laws & Regulations (3-0-3)

This course examines the differing state and federal laws and regulations related to the gaming industry and the role these laws and regulations play in the operations of casinos, hotels, and resort destinations. The application of these state and federal laws and regulations to Native American tribal operations is studied. The course covers information on the development and implementation of a system of internal controls, policies and procedures that will ensure compliance with these laws. A review of the social, political and environmental impacts of gaming on local, regional, and national jurisdictions, as well as licensing requirements and processes for management, employees and vendors, is included.

CGM104 Non-Casino Gaming Operations (3-0-3)

This course covers hotel operations within a casino environment, the information systems that drive the organization and ancillary departments to include retail, transportation, entertainment and property operations. It presents an examination of the management and operation of the human resource function, the role of the food and beverage division within the context of a casino operation, and the role of the marketing and guest services department as it influences the casino environment. Each department will be studied in relationship to its structure, planning process, daily operations, budgetary impacts, and management challenges.

CGM105 Casino Security & Surveillance (3-0-3)

This course acquaints students with the various types of security measures used in the casino industry to help protect the casino from loss and maintain the integrity of the games. Topics include the most commonly used scams and cheating methods for each game. The course also covers camera operations, security surveillance, internal theft and fraud, and investigations.

CGM250 Internship (3-0-3)

This course provides students with the opportunity for concentrated study, observation and work in the area of individual interest in the field of Casino and Gaming Management. An instructor-approved internship is required. This practical experience will better prepare students to nter a career in Casino and Gaming Management. PR: CGM 101 and CGM 102

CHM113 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3-3-4)

This course covers the fundamentals of chemistry in one semester. Topics include dimensional analysis, Modern Atomic Theory, chemical bonding, classification of chemical reactions, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, and the gas laws. The laboratory covers techniques and illustrates the chemical principles covered in the course. This course cannot be used toward the Mathematics/Science, Science, or Computer Science degrees. PR: MAT 128 or equivalent F, S

CHM115 Consumer Chemistry (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to atoms and molecules and applies this to chemistry involved in our everyday lives, such as the chemistry food, household cleaners, personal care products, energy, and materials. The impact of chemistry in our environment will be considered throughout the course.

CHM121 General Chemistry I (3-3-4)

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence. Topics include Modern Atomic Theory, chemical bonding, classification of chemical reactions, stoichemistry, solution chemistry, the gas laws, and enthalpy. The laboratory experiments emphasize techniques, laboratory notebook keeping and illustrate the concepts studied in lecture. PR: High school algebra with trigonometry and high school regents chemistry or CHM 113 within the last five years F, S

CHM122 General Chemistry II (3-3-4)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence. Topics include intermolecular forces, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases and their reactions, buffers, solubility and precipitation reactions, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Selected topics may include nuclear chemistry, an introduction to organic chemistry, and transitional metal chemistry. The laboratory experiments emphasize techniques, laboratory notebook keeping and illustrate the concepts studied in lecture. PR: CHM 121 or equivalent and MAT 129 or higher F, S

CHM200 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry (3-3-4)

This course provides an introduction to the major classes of organic compounds followed by an introduction to biochemistry including a study of the structure and function of the four major macromolecules in biochemistry: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes, and nucleic acids. Other molecules such as hormones and vitamins, which are important to the cellular and molecular processes, will also be studied. PR: CHM 122 or equivalent

CHM228 Organic Chemistry I (4-3-5)

This course is the first course of a two-semester course in organic chemistry. The first semester includes the study of structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, preparation, and reactions and reaction mechanisms of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cyclic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, ethers, epoxides, alcohols, and aromatic compounds. The laboratory stresses techniques, organic synthesis and the use of instruments for analysis. PR: CHM 122 or equivalent

CHM229 Organic Chemistry II (4-3-5)

This course is the second course of a two-semester course in organic chemistry. The second semester includes the study of structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, preparation, reactions and reaction mechanisms of free radicals, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, B-dicarbonyl compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and amines. Special topics may include bioorganic compounds, synthetic polymers, or pericyclic reactions. The laboratory stresses techniques, organic synthesis, and the use of instruments for analysis. PR: CHM 228 or equivalent

CSS095 College Writing Workshop (2-0-2)

This course provides students with additional academic instruction and learning strategies to successfully achieve ENG 123 College Composition student learning outcomes. It individualizes grammar instruction through the interactive web based material, and assignments are directly aligned with those in ENG 123. Additionally, the course instructs students in portfolio development and review as a tool to enhance the writing process. This course is developmental in nature and the two-credit equivalents do not satsify degree or certificate program requirements. CR: ENG 123

CSS106 Mathematics Skills (3-0-3)

This course is a review of basic arithmetic operations with an algebraic approach (including whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios). It provides preparation/review for Intro to Algebra, Business Math, Math for Food Service Records, and Concepts in Mathematics. F,S

CSS116 Skills for College Success (1-0-1)

This one-credit course is designed to provide a brief but intensive review of study skills for success in college. The following skills are covered: setting goals, time management, remembering and reproducing what you learn, textbook reading, note taking, and stress management. F,S

CSS119 ESL for Academic Writing (3-0-3)

This course is targeted for the academically and linguistically diverse population of SCCC students or prospective students whose first language is not English. The multilevel approach will focus on the common areas of difficulty in second language writing and reading. Its main goal is to enable students to engage in academic work with skills commensurate with those of native speakers.

CSS120 Introduction to Algebra (3-0-3)

This course focuses on algebraic operations and properties within the real number system, including integers, rational and irrational numbers. Algebra is introduced to evaluate formulas, solve first degree equations in one variable, perform operations on polynomials, graph lines, and calculate basic geometric formulas. This course provides preparation and review for Algebra I. PR: CSS 106 or equivalent F,S

CSS122 Reading Skills I (3-0-3)

This course is intended to equip students with the skills and strategies to expand vocabulary and comprehend reading material beyond literal meaning. Students study vocabulary weekly using context clues, association, and visualization techniques. Students develop skills in finding main idea, details, and inference by reading a variety of literature and expository materials. Students develop critical thinking skills by analyzing, comparing, and contrasting texts, often in writing. Study skills taught include textbook study strategies and note-taking. F, S

CSS123 Reading Skills II (3-0-3)

This course provides an opportunity to learn and practice reading comprehension skills that go beyond CSS 122. The course continues vocabulary development, higher level comprehension skills, critical reading and thinking, reading textbooks, reading short fiction, and writing as related to reading. Study Skills taught include active reading strategies. PR: CSS 122 or recommendation based on placement test F,S

CSS124 Writing Skills I (3-0-3)

This course provides instruction and practice in the fundamentals of writing including grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and organization. The student moves from paragraph to essay development using the process approach to writing. Unless otherwise indicated in the semester course schedule, this course is taught using computers in an electronic classroom. F,S

CSS125 Writing Skills II (3-0-3)

This course provides an opportunity to learn and practice written communication skills beyond CSS 124. Development of a thesis, introduction, and conclusion is taught, as is the use of transitions and organizational patterns for coherence. Practice in grammar and mechanics is provided. PR: CSS 124 or recommendation based on placement test F,S * These courses are developmental in nature and the three credit equivalents do not satisfy degree or certificate program requirements.

CSS126 Integrated Reading & Writing I (3-0-3)

The course introduces students to active reading strategies and integrates selected readings with writing assignments that focus on sentence and paragraph structure. It also emphasizes the application of appropriate grammar and mechanics.

CSS127 Integrated Reading and Writing Skills II (3-0-3)

This course provides students with the foundation needed for college level reading and writing. It introduces students to reading strategies for a range of texts. Writing assignments are centered on student analysis of these texts. Special emphasis is given to paragraph organization and essay development along with grammar and mechanics. PR: CSS 122 and/or CSS 124 or recommendation based on placement test

COM100 Intro to Human Communication (3-0-3)

This course introduces theories of human communication, including the fundamental skills needed for effective communication across a variety of contexts, such as relational, group, organizational, public, and intercultural communication situations. This course also explores the impact of digital media and the online world on patterns of human communication.

COM105 Public Speaking (3-0-3)

This course introduces the essential steps in preparing and presenting speeches by applying basic communication principles and public-speaking strategies to a variety of speaking assignments.

COM121 Mass Media (3-0-3)

This course focuses on how mass media function and impact United States culture. From both a historical and contemporary point of view, it explains the evolution of the eight areas of mass media: books, magazines, newspapers, recordings, radio, movies, television, and new media. It also explores the technological, economic, political and cultural aspects of the media. Communication and mass media theories are examined in tandem with an analysis of the key issues in the field. PR or CR: ENG 123

COM200 Introductoin to Media Writing (3-0-3)

This course explores the differing writing styles and formats used in a variety of media environments, including print, broadcast, and Web. This course emphasizes gathering relevant and accurate information and writing for specific audiences. Additional topics include writing advertising copy, writing for public relations, and the ethical and legal implications of writing for the media. PR: ENG 123 College Composition or equivalent

COM231 New Media and Society (3-0-3)

This course explores the development of the Internet and such social media as blogs, texts, YouTube, Wikipedia, and online games and examines the impact of this digital revolution on society, politics, and the economy. It also examines the convergence of ld and new media, the digital generation, and the impact of mega-search engines, such as Google and Yahoo. CR: ENG 123

COM235 Intro to Visual Communication (3-0-3)

This course analyzes the production and consumption of visual messages, particularly those found in the media, and their impact on human communication. It combines theory and practice to explain how the human mind both processes and creates meaning from visual phenomena. This course examines the history of visual communication, principles of design and color theory, typography, the technology behind both print and electronic media, and technology's influence on design. The course also explores the idea that images combined with text are powerful ways to inform, educate, and persuade individuals. PR: COM 121 Mass Media or COM 231 New Media and Society

COM265 Communication Internship (9-135-3)

This course provides students the opportunity to explore and gain experience in a career area related to communications in a supervised professional setting. The internship enables students to blend theory, technology, and professional values, while exploring future career paths. The course requires students to complete 45 hours per credit of fieldwork. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. PR: COM 121 Mass Media or COM 231 New Media and Society

CIS102 Computing Basics (1-0-1)

This introductory course provides the student with the computer basics necessary for working with software applications in a personal computer object-oriented environment. Topics include the basics of computer input/output devices, finding and using virtual help sources and file management. Students will be required to make use of personal computers to complete projects.

CIS110 Workstation Architecture and Support I (A+) (3-0-3)

This is part one of a two-part, hands-on, lab-oriented course covering the foundations of PC configuration and support. Topics include installation of different versions of the Windows operating system, building, upgrading, repairing, configuring, troubleshooting, optimizing, diagnosing and the preventive maintenance of PC's. Students learn how to build a computer and install different versions of the Windows operating system.

CIS111 Workstation Architecture and Support II (A+) (3-0-3)

This is part two of a two-part, hands-on, lab-oriented course. Part two of this course introduces local area networks and servers, preventive maintenance techniques, and specific strategies for troubleshooting hardware and software. PR: CIS 110

CIS121 Introduction to Computers (3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to fundamental concepts of computers and computing including number systems, hardware, architecture, information processing, operating systems, networks (including the Internet) and web design. Additionally, students will complete significant projects utilizing contemporary word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation graphics software. Fundamentals of programming will be explored using modern programming languages. Other software applications may be examined during the semester. PR: BUS 115 or equivalent

CIS129 Programming Fundamentals (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to computer programming using a modern, object- oriented programming language. It is intended to be a beginning programming course focusing on programming concepts and fundamentals. PR: MAT 128 or higher F,S

CIS133 Programming in Java (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming using the Java programming language, with a focus on developing high quality, functional solutions to problems. Topics include data types, input/output, control structures, GUI interfaces, methods, classes, inheritance, and polymorphism. Students will use computer facilities to complete programming assignments. PR: CIS 129 F,S

CIS134 C++/UNIX (4-0-4)

Students are introduced to commonly used algorithms. Students employ object-oriented design and object- oriented principles in problem solving using the C++ programming language. Students are introduced to the UNIX operating system and shell scripting. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 129 or equivalent

CIS136 Introduction to Web Development (3-0-3)

This course provides the student with the essential concepts and process of web page development, starting with Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (XHTML) coding and building to more complex layouts using cascading style sheets (CSS). The course will emphasize a disciplined approach to software design and coding. Attention will be directed toward the impact of a designer's choices on communication, understanding and accessibility. Upon completion, all students will develop an original, dynamic, multi-paged website suitable for publishing on the WWW. CR: CIS 102 or adequate proficiency in basic computing skills

CIS140 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting (3-0-3)

This course teaches the basics of computer aided drafting as applied to engineering drawings using the AutoCAD drafting package. Topics include: fundamentals of computer aided drafting, drafting equipment, orthographic representations, special views, applied geometry and drawing conventions, basic dimensioning, section views, thread representation, detail and assembly drawings, auxiliary views, isometric and other pictorial drawings, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. The student will then learn the fundamentals of 3-D solids and sheet designs using the Autodesk Inventor package.

CIS221 Advanced Computer Applications (3-0-3)

This course provides students with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of several components of the Microsoft Office suite of software applications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to test as certified Microsoft Office User Specialists. PR: CIS 121 or equivalent

CIS223 Database Management (3-0-3)

This course will give the student a basic overview of Relational Database Design. The student will acquire advanced knowledge of Microsoft Access and the ISO standard SQL language. Students will work individually on one large project encompassing all phases of database design and implementation. PR: CIS 129 and adequate proficiency in Microsoft Access S

CIS225 Operating Systems (3-0-3)

This course will introduce students to Operating System theory and application. Operating System's concepts and components will be explored in both the UNIX (Linux) and Windows environments.Topics include: process management, communication and synchronization, memory management, device management, file systems, system administration and security. PR: CIS 129

CIS229 Systems Analysis and Design (3-0-3)

This course places an emphasis on a disciplined approach to software development using the application of software engineering principles. Students are provided with a systematic introduction to software development. The course introduces the student to the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC), including a general overview of a typical business-oriented software system, the analysis of the system, an approach to the design of the system, and a plan for system testing and future maintenance. Students work collaboratively on a computer information systems project encompassing all phases of the SDLC. PR: CIS 223

CIS236 Advanced Web Design (3-0-3)

This course provides a practical introduction to JavaScript and the design of dynamic web pages. The student will enhance the functionality and interactivity of web pages by learning to create and utilize embedded and external JavaScript source code. PR: CIS 129 and CIS 136

CIS237 Advanced Web Programming (3-0-3)

This course is for the student who wants to learn advanced web site programming techniques using contemporary development tools and languages. Concepts relating to server-side programming are explored. PR: CIS 129 and CIS 136

CIS238 XML (3-0-3)

This course focuses on XML (eXtendable Markup Language) and the supporting technologies of XML used in person-to- computer and computer-to-computer communications. Some of the technologies covered will include using DTDs, Schema, NamespaSAX, XPath, DOM, SAX, Data Models, XSLT, SVG, and SOAP, as well as services and the Semantic web. PR: CIS 136

CIS240 Internetworking Fundamentals (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to networking. Topics include basic concepts and terminology relating to LANs and WANs including: data communications, types of networks, networking models and theory, protocols, and equipment. There is a strong emphasis on the OSI Model. The material covered in this course is applicable to sections of the Network+ certification exam. Please note that this is not a review course for the Network+ certification exam. CR: CIS 221 or equivalent

CIS241 Routing Fundamentals (3-0-3)

This course covers the theory and application of routers to internetwork communications. There is an initial review of TCP/IP, Ethernet, the OSI model, network terminology, protocols, and standards. Primary emphasis is given to static routing and TCP/IP. Dynamic routing protocols are also introduced. Students will have the opportunity to work with simulator software to apply the concepts learned in class to a Cisco internetwork. PR: CIS 240 and CIS 110

CIS244 Introduction to Routing and Switching (3-0-3)

This course covers the theory and application of routers and switches to network and internetwork communications. Static and dynamic routing technologies are introduced, along with layer 2 switching and VLANs. Students will have the opportunity to work with both simulator software and actual hardware to apply the concepts learned in class. PR: CIS 240

CIS246 Data Structures (3-0-3)

Students are introduced to some commonly used data structures and their applications using C++. Topics include abstract data types, object-oriented programming, stacks, queues, linked lists, sorting, binary search trees, heaps, and hashing. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 134 or equivalent S

CIS250 Computer Organization (4-0-4)

Students are introduced to the structure and implementation of computer systems at the lower levels: the digital logic level, the microprogramming level, and the conventional machine language level. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 134 and MAT 167 or equivalent F

CIS251 Switching and Advanced Routing (4-0-4)

This course provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switched network. The course covers the hierarchical network design model; how to select devices for each layer, how to configure a switch for basic functionality; and how to implement Virtual LANs, VTP, and Inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. Other topics include the implementation and configuration of common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control and addressing services. PR: CIS 241

CIS256 Introduction to Systems Management (3-2-4)

This course introduces topics in managing server-based network operating systems, configurations, security, and troubleshooting. Students will have the opportunity to practice and implement techniques and strategies in class. Students will configure a server to provide file, print, and web services. PR: CIS 240

CIS257 Advanced Networking and Systems Management (3-3-4)

This course covers advanced topics in network communications and administration including server administration, monitoring and troubleshooting. Topics include advanced techniques ni file and printer sharing, email and web services. PR: CIS 256

CIS259 Computer Information Systems Internship (1-8-3)

This course provides the computer information systems/ computer science student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study and field work within selected business entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience are enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate computer related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled meetings with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester during final exam week. PR: CIS or Computer Science major with minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and permission of the department.

CIS262 Network Security (3-0-3)

This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of network and computer security. Topics include server and network hardening, threat assessment, protecting network infrastructure and services, physical security, business continuity and disaster recovery. PR: CIS 251

CIS263 Intro to Computer Forensics (3-0-3)

This course is designed to introduce students to topics necessary to initiate and complete a successful computer investigation. Students will set up a forensics lab, acquire the proper and necessary tools for a successful investigation, and conduct the investigation with subsequent digital analysis. The materials covered in this course are identical to the International Association of Computer Investigation Specialists (IACIS) and the Certified Forensic Computer Examiner (CFCE) Certification exam. PR: CIS 111 and CIS 225

CRJ113 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3-0-3)

This course provides the philosophical and historical background of the agencies that compose the criminal justice system. It focuses on the development of justice and law, crime and punishment, the administration of laws, the agencies' functions, career orientation and public policy. F, S

CRJ117 Police Organization and Supervision (3-0-3)

This is a detailed study of police organization, administration and supervision. This course emphasizes principles of organization, line staff relations, supervisory problems within police organization and supervisory techniques for effective police performance. Detailed explanations of discipline, leadership, motivation and performance appraisals will also be covered. S

CRJ131 Criminal Law (3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the study of substantive criminal law. Selected crimes most likely to be dealt with by the criminal justice professional are explored through discussion, where applicable, of the English Common Law precedents, general modern application and specific New York Penal Law. F

CRJ133 Criminology (3-0-3)

This course provides an etiology of crime and criminal behavior. The course delves into biological, psychological and sociological theories that examine arrest and conviction data. Analysis of criminal activity through an understanding of the theories is undertaken. S

CRJ135 Introduction to Security (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the various facets of modern security operations in a variety of settings. Security problems, both internal and external, and possible solutions will be explored for plant protection and industrial security, retail security and institutional security. S

CRJ143 Criminal Evidence and Procedure (3-0-3)

This course presents an in-depth analysis of the rules of criminal evidence. The process of the American criminal justice system will be examined and special emphasis will be placed on Constitutional limitations in the area of criminal evidence and the law of search and seizure. Topics also include concepts of evidence and rules governing its admissibility, theoretical and pragmatic considerations of substantive and procedural laws affecting arrest, and search and seizure. This course demonstrates the importance of case law at the state and federal levels and its impact on the administration of law. S

CRJ147 Terrorism and Public Security (3-0-3)

This introductory course investigates the criminal, economic, historical, political, psychological, and social roots of terrorist phenomenon. The course explores existing and potential terorist threats and how local, national, and global communities may counter these threats.

CRJ150 Airport Security and Management (3-0-3)

This course familiarizes students with the fundamental components of a typical commercial airport and its multi-level security requirements. In addition to a commercial airport's various support functions, the organizational structure, governing FAA regulations, inter-agency relationships and management challenges are examined. Security issues are presented in a post 9/11 environment to include scenario-based discussions and problem-solving situations.

CRJ152 Policing Theory and Practice I (3-0-3)

This course is designed to teach students the necessary theoretical background and practical skills to function as county and municipal level law enforcement officers. Topics reviewed in lecture and in applied exercises include administration of justice, basic law and procedures and patrol functions.

CRJ153 Policing Theory and Practice II (3-0-3)

This course continues the study of law enforcement begun in Policing Theory and Practice I. It is designed to teach students the necessary theoretical background and practical skills to function as county and municipal level law enforcement officers. Topics reviewed in lecture and in applied exercises include traffic procedures, investigation procedures, community relations, and supervised field training. PR: CRJ 152

CRJ196 CRJ Experimental (3-0-3)



CRJ215 Juvenile Delinquency (3-0-3)

This course offers an intensive study of the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency. It addresses the nature of youth crime and the critical issues of juvenile delinquency. The course provides students with a greater understanding of the present juvenile justice system including the biological, psychological and sociological approaches being administered in an attempts to reduce juvenile crime. F

CRJ217 Principles of Investigation (3-0-3)

This course offers an introduction to the basic principles and a detailed examination of specific offenses. The course focuses on the crime scene, physical evidence interviewing and interrogation, and the use of informers and confessions. The study of specific offenses focuses on the scientific approach and the methodology used in crime detection. F

CRJ219 Corrections (3-0-3)

This course is a detailed study of the history, theory and practice of probation, parole and correctional institutions. It will also explore punishment, rehabilitation, community-based corrections and capital punishment as they exist today. F

CRJ229 Community Based Corrections (3-0-3)

This course exposes the student to the concept of community corrections as compared to the more familiar institutional correctional settings. The course will deal with such programs as probation, parole, half- way houses, home detention and other alternatives to incarceration. Relevant law and both adult and juvenile systems will be examined in public and private programs at local, state and federal levels. S

CRJ230 Interpersonal Violence (3-0-3)

This course will provide a unique perspective on the issue of interpersonal violence concentrating on the public perception and criminal justice approach to sexual assaults and sexual offenders. An emphasis will be placed on charateristics and behavioral patterns of the offender and the crime itself. Particular attention will be given to the critical issues of victimology, rape typologies, stalking, domestic violence and criminal/constitutional law. Students will benefit from this course as it explores the etiology of sexually deviant behavior from both sociological and psychological approaches within the functioning of the criminal justice system. Students will learn to develop an informed analysis of sexual offenses, sexual offenders, the public perception and the handling of such offenders within the criminal justice system. PR: CRJ 113 or SOC 121

CRJ233 Current Issues in Criminal Justice (3-0-3)

This course is designed to allow study and discussion of those relevant issues of most current concern affecting components of the criminal justice system. Such issues as hiring practices, community relations, court decisions, and the impact of the mass media may be explored in relationship to the administration of justice in America. F

CRJ237 Criminal Justice Internship (3-0-3)

This is a planned practicum of observation, study and work within selected criminal justice agencies designed to broaden the student's educational experience through exposure to the practical environment of such agencies. The student's field work will be supplemented by periodic seminars with the course instructor. PR: Criminal Justice major, completion of 30 credit hours with a 2.5 G.P.A., and permission of the department S

DRA123 Introduction to the Theatre (3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to the essential elements of theatre. It explores the historical theatre and contemporary production processes, encompassing the artistic, craft, and business practices of the theatre. This course grounds aesthetic and articstic movement and principles in the larger culture and examines the interactions between audience and performance.

DRA133 Theatre Workshop (2-2-3)

This course focuses on direct student participation in the creation, design, rehearsal, production and performance of short, in-process theatrical works.

DRA143 History of Western Theatre (3-0-3)

This course will study the evolution of the Western theatre, from its possible precursors in religious and civic practices in the ancient world to the present day. This course will specifically concentrate on the evolutions of playwrighting, theatrical architecture, performance style and technique, spectacle (including scenery, costumes, special effects and lighting), dramatic theory and criticism and the relationship between the societies studied and their theatres. S

DRA150 Basic Acting (2-2-3)

This course investigates a broad range of modern and contemporary theories, ideologies, techniques, and processes in the field of stage acting. Students will apply those concepts to in-class exercises, to scene study, and to performances. Students will use those concepts to begin to develop the physical, vocal, and imaginative skills of the actor.

DRA181 Theatre in London (2-2-3)

This course delivers an overview of theatre in contemporary London. After an on-campus and/or Internet introductory seminar, students will travel to London for approximately two weeks. They will develop understanding of the contemporary London theatrical and dramatic scenes through a series of tours, performances, guest lectures, and/or demonstrations. Historical perspective will be added through lectures and theatrical tours. Cross-cultural perspectives will be added by lectures, tours of gardens, museums, monuments, libraries, and individually selected activities and excursions. Students will present final projects on the SCCC campus or via the Internet after their return from London.

DRA240 Rehearsal and Production I (1-5-3)

Rehearsal and Production I is designed to introduce and develop students' performance, management and/or technical skills through participation in productions. The course will provide entry level instruction in appropriate performance, management and technical skills, utilizing production processes to expand students' skill levels. Skills and techniques will be honed in professionally supervised practice sessions. The course will culminate in a fully staged theatrical production open to the general public.

DRA242 Rehearsal and Production II (1-5-3)

Rehearsal and Production II is designed to further develop students' performance, management and/or technical skills through participation in productions. The course will provide students with active roles in the areas of performance, management and technical skills. Skills and techniques will be honed in professionally supervised practice sessions. The course will culminate in a fully staged theatrical production open to the general public. PR: DRA 240 and permission of the department

DRA244 Rehearsal and Production III (1-5-3)

In Rehearsal and Production III, students take the responsibility for developing expertise and leadership in one area of theatrical production, either performance, direction, design, stage management, house management or technical production. They will hone their skills in professionally supervised practice sessions. The course will culminate in a fully staged theatrical production open to the general public. PR: DRA 240 or 242 and permission of instructor

DRA265 Theatre Arts Internship (3-0-3)

This course provides the student with a planned and supervised work experience in a professional theatrical setting. Each individually planned and designed experience introduces the work and culture of a specific theatre field, and focuses on developing appropriate skill sets. It requries 8 hours of classroom instruction and a minimum of 120 hours of field work. PR: DRA 123 and/or permission of the department

ECH121 Introduction to Early Childhood (3-0-3)

This course examines the fundamental philosophies of early childhood education from historical perspective. This course emphasizes quality early childhood programming and its significance in educating children birth through eight years of age. This course allows students to reflect upon their role as potential teachers and advocates for children while identifying how service learning experiences are integrated in early childhood education. Ten observation hours are required. This course requires that students complete the following documentation by Week 4: 1) Medical consent to work with children and a negative TB test, 2) Notarized criminal conviction statement, and 3) Signed agreement to uphold the National Association of Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Code of Ethics and SCCC ECH Professional Behaviors. F

ECH123 Curricular Methods I and Assessment (3-0-3)

This course focuses on curriculum development and assessment in early childhood education. It introduces students to the important frameworks for planning, implementing, and evaluating curricula as it impacts child development and the various content areas. In-depth studies of developmentally appropriate curriculum models provide emphasis on the methods and strategies that inform the development of meaningful and relevant curriculum. Assessment driven learning, environment and curriculum development is applied. Students spend a minimum of ten hours observing in an early childhood environment.

ECH131 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar I (1-8-4)

This course allows students the opportunity for direct practical teaching and learning in early childhood education within community agencies and/or the SCCC Early Childhood Program Laboratory Preschool. Additionally, in a seminar setting, students reflect on and share their experiences. Students will spend eight to ten hours per week in their field placement to accumulate a minimum of 130 hours. PR: ECH 121 and ECH 123

ECH220 Engendering Creativity: Arts in the Classroom (3-0-3)

This course is an exploration of creative expression with an emphasis placed on the importance of the arts in every child's education. As students unlock their own creative potential, they also become skilled at using methods and techniques that encourage creative development in young children. Students reflect on aesthetics while analyzing the movements and techniques of the visual arts and the genres and elements of music. Students then apply their understanding by presenting art, music, and drama activities to young children. Throughout the semester, students develop an art and music portfolio.

ECH223 Curricular Methods II and Development of Inquiry Skills (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the early developmental abilities of children ages birth to eight years in social studies, math and science. Sensory, preoperational and concrete operational thought processes of conservation, seriation, observation, comparison, classification, and number concepts will be examined through the use of concrete social studies, math, and science materials and experiences that foster student quantitative and analytical thinking. The course requires students to implement developmentally appropriate social students, math, and science activities which address diversity in children's learning styles. A service learning experience is required. PR: ECH 123

ECH225 Fostering Emergent Literacy (4-0-4)

The course examines the development of literacy skills in children ages birth to 8 years. Multiple opportunities to recognize the developmental stages in literacy acquisition, to indentify factors that influence literacy development, and to discuss how to design and implement a literacy program are provided. Genre of literature, curricular themes, and resources for children of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are empasized. Guidelines for the design and implementation of literature- based activities are applied throughout the course. Students will observe for a minimum of 15 hours in an early childhood literacy environment.

ECH227 Guidance of Young Children (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the early developmental abilities of children ages birth to eight years and approriate utilization of guidance strategies to enhance children's self esteem and consequently increase children's self- discipline skills. The correlation between children's environments and behaviors will be researched. The importance of play, social interactions, and family expectations on children's development will be analyzed.

ECH231 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar II (1-8-4)

This course allows students the opportunity for direct practical teaching and learning in early childhood education within community agencies or the SCCC Early Childhood Program Laboratory Preschool. The course requires students to reflect on and share their experiences in a seminar setting. The course also requires students to spend eight to ten hours per week in their field placement to accumulate a minimum of 130 hours. A service learning implementation is required. PR: ECH 131 F

ECH252 Care of Infants and Toddlers (3-0-3)

This course examines infant and toddler development with an emphasis on the importance of the first thirty-six months in relation to human development. Attachment, early brain research and developmentally approriate practices will be emphasized as critical factors which impact a caregiver's role in meeting individual children's needs. Students complete ten hours of observational field work in this course.

ECH255 Administration of Early Childhood Programs (3-0-3)

This course provides administrative management training in the field of Early Childhood Education. This course addresses issues and techniques involved in the set-up, organization and administration of early childhood environments. Focus is placed on the initiation and maintenance of an early childhood program which includes the investigation and application of pertinent skills necessary to perform as an effective and competent program director. Ten hours of field work will be completed in this course.

ECH260 ECH Portfolio Seminar (1-0-1)

This capstone seminar is intended for ECH majors who are about to graduate from their Early Childhood Program. Knowledge and skills acquired in the program are reviewed and analyzed to demonstrate their proficiency in a pre-professional portfolio. Opportunity is provided for technical assistance on an individual basis. Each student assembles a portfolio as a summative experience to be presented to a professional review team. PR: Permission of the Department

ECO211 Introduction to Economics (3-0-3)

This course provides an overview of microeconomic and macroeconomic issues and an understanding of the economic choices that individuals, firms, and governments face. It also introduces the concept of scarcity and the working process of a market economic system. Further, this course examines the different market structures, the role of the firm and the impact of government intervention on markets. Finally, this course discusses the meaning and computation of national income, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international trade, and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the economy. F, S

ECO221 Principles of Macroeconomics (3-0-3)

This course provides an analytical framework for the understanding of the economy at the national level. This course will also analyze the purpose and functions of national income accounting, the components of Gross Domestic Product, the determinants of long run economic growth, the causes and costs of inflation and unemployment. In addition, this course will cover the economic impacts of fiscal and monetary policies and the differences between short run and long run macroeconomic aspects of the economy. Finally, this course will examine the importance of the U.S. financial system, the macroeconomic effects of international trade and the determination of interest and exchange rates. F,S

ECO223 Principles of Microeconomics (3-0-3)

This course develops an analytical framework for the understanding of the theory of markets, including the decision-making process in businesses, the impact of technological advances on markets and the functioning of the four different market structures. This course will also provide a closer look at the interactions of individual households, business firms and governments in the marketplace. Finally, this course will discuss economic issues related to the well-being of market participants, the tradeoffs between equity and efficiency, the economics of taxation and subsidies, the economics of healthcare, the economics of poverty and income inequality, labor market issues and the basis of free trade. F, S

ELT110 Circuits for Digital Systems I (3-3-4)

This course is an introduction to direct current (DC) circuits. Digital systems and circuits using logical gates will also be studied. Basic DC circuits entails a study of Ohm's Law and use of the law to theoretically predict measured voltages, currents, resistances and power through resistors connected in series, parallel and series-parallel circuits. This course uses voltmeters, ammeters, ohmmeters, multimeters, and oscilloscopes for measurement and troubleshooting. PR: MAT 128 or higher S

ELT118 Digital Logic (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of number systems, Boolean algebra, logic gates, codes, binary arithmetic and digital circuits using Integrated Circuit Technology.

ELT121 Circuits for Digital Systems II (3-3-4)

This course is a continuation of circuits including AC circuits as applicable to digital systems and controls. Basic AC circuits are covered, along with single and 3-phase AC power and distribution. Series and parallel RLC circuits are covered, along with the use of an oscilloscope in troubleshooting and measurement. Digital systems are covered, with the examination of three state busses and the chips needed to interface with them in personal computer applications. PR: ELT 110, MAT 129 F

ELT123 Eletrical Schematics (2-0-2)

This course offers a broad overview of schematics and diagrams. Topics include electrical symbols, component identification, Block diagrams, pictorial diagrams, three- dimensional drawings, and print reading. PR: ELT 121 (Electrical Circuits II)

ELT230 Electronics (4-3-5)

This course is an introduction to electronics as applied to digital systems and controls. DC power supplies, zener diodes, switching transistors and linear and non-linear operational amplifier circuits are covered. The course stresses design and prototyping of circuits used in control systems and measurement. PR: MAT 129, ELT 110, ELT 121 F

ELT256 Process Control and Instrumentation (3-3-4)

This course is an introduction to process control fundamentals and the application of digital controllers in a process environment. Analog and digital signal conditioning interfacing stand-alone computers using signal processing software, and the basics of automatic process control are studied. The course will emphasize the application of Programmable Logical Devices (PLD) and the use of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). PR: ELT 231 CR: MAT 129 S

ELT261 Programmable Logic Controls (3-3-4)

This course is an introduction to the Logic and Programming of Logical Devices used in system controls. The course covers Binary, Octal and Hexadecimal number systems and introduces the elements of Assembly Programming, Logical gates, and the operations of Boolean algebra using standard digital waveforms. This course also includes Shift Registers and Counters, Adders and triggering clocks using specialized software, Digital-to-Analog conversion methodology, decoders and multiplexers. PR: CIS 221, ELT 110 CR: MAT 129

ELT270 Power Electronics (3-0-3)

This course introduces linear integrated power amplifiers, switches, and regulators. Component operations and application and the use and troubleshooting of these components is covered. Topics include power parameter calculations, principles of power electronics prototype and printed circuit board (pcb) layout, linear integrated circuit power amplifiers for intermediate audio signal amplification, discrete linear power amplifiers for signals with higher power requirements, power switches, switching power, thyristor uses in commercial power line applications, power conversion, and permanent magnet motor drivers. PR: ELT 231

EMS210 Basic EMT (2-7-4)

This course is designed to meet New York State Health Department (Bureau of Emergency Health Services) requirements for Emergency Medical Technician training. This course is updated yearly to include materials appropriate for EMT training as included in the New York State EMS program CFR/EMT/AEMT student manual. The course will adhere to the SCCC/REMO AMT Sponsor's agreement and all current New York State regulations for EMT training, including requirements for class time and instructor certification. Students should note that some Saturday sessions are required in addition to regularly scheduled class hours. PR: All students must be at least 18 years old. F,S

EMS220 Selected Topics in EMT (2-3-3)

This course is designed to meet New York State Health Department (Bureau of Emergency Health Services) requirements for EMT Refresher. New laws and policies will be discussed, as well as new technology appropriate to the course which has been introduced during the past three years. The course will adhere to the SCCC/ REMO AMT Sponsor's Agreement and all current New York State regulations for EMT-B training, including requirements for class time and instructor certification. PR: A student may have a current EMT card that will expire in less than 18 months; a student who was certified as a NYS Emergency Medical Technician may have a lapsed certification; a student who has previously failed the Final Practical Skills Exam within one year or has failed the state written certifying exam after a second attempt may enroll in the refresher course. Proof of failure must be provided to the CIC by the student; a student who has received written permission from the Bureau of EMS to enroll in an EMT-B refresher course as a result of filing for reciprocity based on EMT training from another state. The student must submit the letter which was provided from the Bureau of EMS as proof of eligibility for enrolling in the refresher. F, S

EMS999 EMS Elective (4-0-4)



ENG123 College Composition (3-0-3)

This course provides a foundation in academic discourse by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing; an oral presentation is required. PR: Exemption from placement testing as defined by the Academic Code or successful completion of CSS 127

ENG124 Literature & Writing (3-0-3)

This course encourages students to use writing to explore the ways in which literature functions as an art form. Writing and research techniques introduced in ENG 123 College Composition are strengthened and refined. PR: ENG 123

ENG200 Introduction to Creative Writing (3-0-3)

Students will learn the essential principles, strategies, and methods of creative writing and will acquire a foundation in the skills necessary to master this art. The emphasis will be on the writing of short fiction, but opportunities will be provided to explore poetry, drama, screenwriting, the novel, and the essay. Students will also learn how to go about getting their work published. PR: ENG 123 CR: ENG 124

ENG205 Writing Poetry (3-0-3)

This course focuses on developing students' abilities to write, revise, and analyze poetry. It is primarily conducted as a workshop: students write and revise their own poetry, as well as give oral feedback and produce written critiques of their peers' poems. In addition, the course introduces students to a variety of poetic forms and asks them to write poetry in these forms. It also introduces them to theories of free verse and to studies of the poetic line and asks them to write their own free verse. The course also includes an oral component: students practice reading their own and others' poems to the class. Last, the class introduces students to opportunities for performing and publishing their poetry. PR: ENG 123

ENG211 Technical and Professional Writing (3-0-3)

This course applies the principles of effective writing to the specific forms of professional and technical writing. It emphasizes designing texts and oral reports for professional audiences after analyzing the needs and values of those audiences. PR: ENG 123 College Composition

ENG295 English Experimental Course (4-0-4)



ENG296 English Experimental (3-0-3)



ENV100 Introduction to Environmental Science (3-0-3)

This one-semester course introduces students to environmental concepts and issues. The course covers environmental issues and controversies from ecological, biological, social, economic, ethical and governmental policy positions. In addition, the course emphasis is placed on the tools and techniques needed to understand and analyze environmental topics such as energy, solid waste, food production, resource depletion, air and water issues and global climate change. PR: High School Algebra or MAT 128

ENV195 Intro to Oceanography (3-0-3)

This course is designed to give the student a broad multidisciplinary survey of the physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes of the world's oceans. This course provides the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and analytical skills to deal with critical topics in oceanography, such as impact of ocean currents on weather and storm systems, wave dynamics and shore erosion, tides and sea-level rise flooding, biodiversity and economic importance of estuaries, coral reefs, and global climate change. PR: MAT 095 or equivalent

ENV203 General Ecology (3-3-4)

Through lecture and laboratory experiences this course focuses on the study of major ecological principles including: population and community biology, competition and predation, physiological ecology and adaptations, ecosystems, nutrient cycles, energy flow, and ecological succession. The ecological basis of contemporary environmental problems is examined and related to human activities. Quantitative perspectives and analysis will be used throughout. PR: BIO 142 and CHM 122, or equivalent

ENV205 The Environment and Social Issues (3-0-3)

This course is designed to provide a multidisciplinary introduction to the understanding of social issues that impact humans and their relationship to the environment as well as their participation in decision making roles that lead to environmental problem solving. The course will concentrate on: varying factors that influence individual and cultural differences in identification and perception of environmental issues, the social processes involved in addressing the identified environmental problems, and introductory techniques for the integration of different human values and cultural processes into environmental planning and management strategies. PR: BIO 142 and CHM 122, or equivalent

ENV260 Subtropical Coastal and Marine Ecology (4-0-4)

This course focuses on the current environmental and ecological issues of a subtropical ecosystem (Indian River Lagoon). The lectures and field experiences will emphasize the application of basic ecological principles to life in the coastal ecosystem, then focus on characteristics of marine and coastal habitats and the groups of organisms that occur there. The course will include physical, chemical and biological aspects of these salt/fresh-water environments, and will explore several different marine ecosystems: reefs, seagrass beds, salt water marshes, mangrove, and cypress swamps. Students will analyze the role of human impact on these environments, spending a maximum amount of time in the field. Through direct observations, species collection, water analysis, and lecture the students will develop an understanding of how such issues as food production, energy consumption, population growth, greenhouse effect, all impact upon these environments, their usage and quality. The laboratory portion of the course will involve two weeks of intensive field work at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Florida. There is a separate field trip cost, which will include air fare, transportation, room and board, and site costs. Because the field experience occurs after the May Commencement, graduating students may not use this course to meet graduation requirements. Graduating students may take this course if a) they are willing to miss Commencement and b) they meet all graduation requirements without this course. Graduates may also choose to postpone graduation until the following semester. PR: One year of college biology or chemistry or consent of Department

ETH221 Professional and Applied Ethics (1-0-1)

This course provides exposure to leading ethical theories as well as an opportunity to employ these principles. Aided by viewing videotaped, dramatized scenarios, the reasons advanced for acting ethically and the excuses given for not acting ethically will be studied. The consequences of freedom and personal responsibility will be explored, as will the ability to recognize ethical issues. F,S

FPT112 Principles of Emergency Services (3-0-3)

This is an introductory course that surveys the historical development of fire protection, organizational structure of fire agencies, and the range of issues and topics related to fire protectin. This course meets United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum.

FPT115 Hazardous Materials I (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the nature of hazardous materials (HazMat) and the role of First Responders in prevention, mitigation, and remediation of incidents. Hazardous materials risk is presented within the context of First Responder operations. This course fully integrates National Incident Management (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) protocols.

FPT116 Hazardous Materials II (3-0-3)

A continuation of Hazardous Materials I, course content stresses recognition of potentially hazardous situations, protocols of organized response, and regulatory guidelines. Hazardous materials response is presented within the context of First Responder operations. Specific attention is placed on the different response protocols needed for remediation of weapons of mass destruction events and other sources of HazMat situations resulting from natural disasters, accidents, negligence and criminal activities. This course fully integrates National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) protocols. PR: FPT 115

FPT120 Building Construction for Fire Protection (3-0-3)

This course provides the components of building construction that relate to fire and life safety. The focus of this course is on firefighter safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, pre-planning fire operations, and operating at emergencies.

FPT131 Fire Prevention (3-0-3)

This course provides fundamental information regarding the history of fire prevention, organizations and operation of a fire prevention bureau, use of fire codes, identification and correction of fire hazards, and the relationships of fire prevention with built-in fire protection systems, fire investigation, and fire and life safety education. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements.

FPT135 Fire Administration (3-0-3)

This course focuses on organization, personnel management distribution of equipment, records and fire safety as they pertain to the fire service. Techniques for successful and efficient fire service operations are covered in this course. These topics include communications and fire alarm systems, legal aspects of fire prevention, fire investigation and the recording and evaluation of fire data for statistical purposes.

FPT137 Fire Protection Systems (3-0-3)

This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements.

FPT215 Fire Investigation (3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the following subjects as they individually relate to fire investigations: elements of fire, combustion properties of fuel, pyrolysis, burn patterns, ignition sources and explosions. A review of methods of interviewing, report writing, rules of evidence, forensic lab procedures, model arson law and NYS arson law is included. PR: May require New York State Police identification and/or registration

FPT216 Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply (3-0-3)

This course provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements. PR: MAT 128

FPT219 Fire Behavior and Combustion (3-0-3)

This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and how they are controlled. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements.

FPT237 Industrial Fire Protection (3-0-3)

Provides an introduction to the field of industrial fire protection and focuses on the topics of hazard control, special hazards and protection, fire protection equipment, and systems and handling of emergencies.

FPT250 Fire Protection Internship (3-0-3)

This course provides the fire protection technology student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study, and field work within selected areas of the fire protection profession. These areas include but are not limited to: municipal fire departments, state or local fire protection agencies, industrial fire safety organizations, and installers of fire protection systems. Textbook theory and classroom experience are enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate fire protection, prevention, or suppression related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. PR: FPT major with 30 completed credits, minimum overall GPA of 2.5, FPT course in area of internship, and permission of the department.

FPT999 Fire Elective (4-0-4)



FSS120 Freshman Success Seminar (1-0-1)

The First Year Success Seminar is an orientation course designed to enhance the success of first-year college students by introducing such topics as time management, learning styles, classroom expectations, support services and resources, major/career planning, stress management, and personal wellness.

FRE121 Elementary French I (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to the French language through the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. It also examines the cultures of French- speaking people throughout the world. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab. Students are required to complete five documented hours of lab work outside of class.

FRE122 Elementary French II (3-0-3)

The second half of the one-year sequence in Elementary French continues the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. The course continues to provide an understanding of the civilization, culture and customs of French-speaking people in multiple countries. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab. Students are required to complete five documented hours of lab work outside of class. PR: FRE 121 or its equivalent

FRE222 Intermediate French I (3-0-3)

This course provides an extensive review of French grammar, and concentrates on helping students improve their vocabulary, conversational fluency and reading skills through the discussion of selected readings in French. Classroom discussions on the readings and French culture are held primarily in French. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language lab is required per term. PR: FRE 122 or permission of the instructor

FRE224 Intermediate French II (3-0-3)

A continuation of Intermediate French I, this course completes the review of French grammar and provides more reading of French literature and non-fictional prose. Classroom discussions in French are held on the readings and on French customs and culture. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language lab is required per term. PR: FRE 222 or permission of the instructor

GHY121 Physical Geography (3-0-3)

This is a one-semester, non-lab science course in physical geography. Weather elements and climate characteristics are examined. Detailed consideration is given to each climate region, the location of that region, and the causes for that climate. Geologic factors that shape land forms are examined. Consideration is given to the flora and fauna of each climate region, including the causes for the distribution of these biologic assemblages. A strong emphasis is placed on teaching the locations of various geographic features. F

GHY123 Population Geography (3-0-3)

This course explores the general principles of human and cultural geography. Spatial and ecological relationships are examined to obtain a perspctive for contemporary world patterns. Special consideration is given to the nature and characteristics of areas to which Americans frequently travel as well as the impact of our travels. S Credit in GHY 123 does not satisfy a science requirement.

GEO143 Physical Geology (3-3-4)

This is the first part of a two-course sequence introducing students to the nature, processes and formation of Earth's material and the majors features of the earth's crust and topography. This course will consider the mineralogy of the rocks, different rock types and structures. Detailed consideration will be given to the internal processes that shape the earth's surface, including plate tectonics, igneous activities, weathering, erosion and deposition and earthquakes. PR: Two years of high school science and mathematics. F

GEO145 Surface Geology (3-3-4)

This is the second part of a two-semester sequence introducing students to the features of the earth's crust and topography. This course will consider the various geologic agents and processes that produce, shape and modify the surface environment. Detailed consideration will be given to the rise and decay of mountains, moving water, glaciers, deserts, shorelines and oceans as well as comparative planetary geology with other bodies in the Solar System. PR: Two years of high school science and mathematics. NOTE: Students using Geology as a lab science sequence are advised to take GEO 143 before GEO 145. Either course may be taken alone as a single lab science elective. S

GER999 German Elective (3-0-3)



HEA100 Medical Terminology (3-0-3)

This course provides students with the core knowledge and terminology used in the medical and healthcare-related professions to describe the organ systems of the human body and to understand diagnoses, therapies, drug classification and the basics of pharmacology. The course also covers the application of medical terminology in the context of a medical record management environment.

HEA101 Healthcare Ethics & Law (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to standards of ethical practice in healthcare. The legal requirements and regulations and their application and use in decision making in healthcare are covered. There is an emphasis on government regulations regarding the handling of patient information and patient treatment, as well as examination of professional ethical dilemmas.

HIM110 Introduction to Healthcare Information Systems (3-0-3)

This course provides students with an introduction to the significant changes and trends in the Health Information Management profession. The course covers healthcare information systems, career paths within the profession, and clinical data management.

HIM112 Electronic Healthcare Delivery (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to an integrated approach to Practice Management and the Electronic Health Record (EHR). The course provides practical experience using simulated clinical activities provided by Medisoft Clinical Applications software. CR: HIM 110

HIM201 Healthcare Billing and Reimbursement (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the various healthcare reimbursement systems, reimbursement methodologies and payment processes. The relationship between coding systems, insurance claims and reimbursement is emphasized. Managing the billing cycle and resolving issues with insurance claims are covered. PR: HIM 112

HIM202 Current Procedures in Terminology (3-2-4)

This course introduces students to physician services coding, billing and data quality procedures. Students will learn to read, interpret and code physician office documentation. Special emphasis is placed on assigning Evaluation and Management (E/M) codes, outpatient diagnostic coding guidelines, Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), and Health Care Financing Administration Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) codes. PR: BIO 112, HEA 100, HIM 110, and HIM 112 CR: HIM 201, HIM 203

HIM203 ICD Coding Systems and Lab (3-2-4)

This course introduces students to disease and operation classification using the International Classification of Disease, (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM). The course covers diagnosis-related groups and their relationship to coding, the historical development of the International Classification of Disease, and various nomenclature and classification systems. The course will require students to differentiate between the various abstracting methods used to collect patient data. PR: HEA 100, HIM 110 and HIM 112 CR: HIM 201, HIM 202

HIM204 Professional Internship Experience (1-8-3)

This course is a supervised clinical practice experience in a healthcare setting. The course provides students with experience performing the coding of patient health records including application of coding systems and the use of coding software. A minimum of 96 hours in the clinical experience, which may be scheduled over a six to 12 week period, as determined by the placement site, is required. Attendance at a weekly seminar that offers professional development activities and involves the use of internship software to prepare for career entry is also required. PR: HEA 100, HEA 101, HIM 110, HIM 112, HIM 201, HIM 202 and HIM 203

HSC100 Introduction to the Health Professions (1-0-1)

This course is designed to enhance the success of first- year students who are interested in a career in a health- related profession. It will assist students in making informed career choices by exposing them to a variety of health professions and the process necessary to become a health care professional. Also, students will be introduced to the tools and skills needed to become a successful college student, such as time management, learning styles, classroom expectations, support services, and orientation to the campus.

HSC999 Health Prof Elect (0-0-4)



HIS125 Western Civilization to 1715 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the development of Western Civilization from ancient times to 1715. It focuses in particular on political, cultural, social, and economic aspects fo the history of the West and relates these features to those of other regions of the world during the same period.

HIS127 Western Civilization Since 1715 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the development of Western Civilization since 1715. It focuses in particular on economic, political, social, and cultural aspects of the history of the West and relates these features to those of other regions of the world during the same period. F,S

HIS130 Introduction to Black History in the United States (3-0-3)

This course is an overview of Black history and culture in America. It examines a broad range of experiences from the first documented arrival of Blacks in colonial America in 1619 to the present. PR: Any college-level history course

HIS227 American History to 1877 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to American history from the pre-Columbian period to Reconstruction. It covers political, economical, social, and cultural forces that have shaped the evolving American nation and its interactions with the world during this time. F,S

HIS229 American History Since 1877 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to key events, people, and ideas in American history from the Reconstruction period to the recent past. It focuses on diverse political, economic, social, and cultural forces that have shaped the American nation and its interactions with the rest of the world during this time. It also explores the methods and skills historians use to reconstruct the past.

HIS231 Introduction to Russian History (3-0-3)

This course surveys the history of Russia and related areas from the earliest times to the present. It emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural developments. It includes the geographical areas of present-day Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and other areas of significant Russian influence, such as the imperial conquests and Soviet Republics of Central Asia, the Caucasus, and the Baltic States. It also focuses on Russian relations with European and other world powers, as well as ethnic Russian interaction with other ethnicities that are or have historically been part of the Russian/Soviet state.

HIS232 World Civilizations to 1700 (3-0-3)

This course surveys world civilizations from ancient times to about 1700. It emphasizes political, economical, social, and cultural developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. The course explores the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities.

HIS233 History of Women and Gender in the United States (3-0-3)

This course uses the lens of women's and gender history from the colonial period to the recent past to survey major themes in the development of American civilization. It focuses on variables such as race, class, sexual orientation and national origin, and how they impacted the way in which women understood their lives and had access to opportunity. It also covers individuals who stand out as heroines and "firsts," and explores how gender has shaped the experiences of all Americans. PR: Any college-level history course or permission of instructor

HIS234 World Civilizations Since 1700 (3-0-3)

This course surveys world civilizations from about 1700. It emphasizes political, cultural, economic, and social developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. The course explores the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities.

HIS237 Introduction to Chinese History (3-0-3)

This course surveys the history of China and related areas from the earliest times to the present. It emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural deveopments. It also focuses on Chinese relations with European and other world powers, as well as ethnic Chinese interaction with other ethnicities that are or have historically been part of a Chinese state.

HIS241 European Witch Trials (3-0-3)

This course surveys the history of the persecution of accused witches from the Middle Ages through the Early Modern era in Europe, and including New England. The focus is on the anthropological, religious, legal, political and socio-economic contexts in which beliefs about magic and witches arose and were widely accepted. Attention is given to regional variations in witch beliefs and trial procedures. The course also surveys the growth of skepticism, toleration, and the gradual decline of witch persecution to the end of the seventeenth century. PR: HIS 125 or HIS 232

HIS243 The Viking World (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the history and culture of the Vikings and associated peoples, both in their Scandinavian homelands and abroad in the British Isles, Contenental Europe, Russia, and North America. The course starts with prehistory and concludes around the 12th century. The course focuses on political, economic, and cultural aspects of Viking-Era Scandinavian societies, including skaldic poetry and saga literature. It also focuses on the interrelations and mutual influences of these societies with neighboring peoples.

HIS296 History Experimental (3-0-3)



HON122 Honors Intro to E-Portfolios (1-0-1)

This course introduces students to the concepts and implementation of e-portfolios and requires them to develop one that may serve as a model for their program-based portfolios. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Concentration

HON123 Honors College Composition (3-0-3)

This course provides a foundation in academic discourse by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing, argumentation, professional communication strategies, visual rhetoric, and service learning. In addition, the course implements e-portfolios and requires students to develop an e-portfolio that may serve as a model for their program-based portfolio that may serve as a model PR: Matriculation into the Honors Concentration

HON124 Honors English (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to literary genres, analysis, and criticism. Students analyze and interpret poetry; fiction, including a novel; drama; and literary criticism. They write critically about these genres. Credit will not be given for both HON 124 and ENG 124. PR: ENG/HON 123 and meets criteria for Honors Concentration

HON125 Honors Western Civ to 1715 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the development of Western civilization from ancient times to 1715. It focuses on political, cultural, social, and economic aspects fo the history of the West and relates these features to those of other regions of the world during the same period. The course includes significant exposure to primary sources, including the canon of philosophical, literary, artistic, and other material products of Western civilization, and requires students to inerpret these critically, using creative scholarly research. It also introduces students to historical thinking and methodology. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Program

HON234 Honors World Civ since 1700 (3-0-3)

This course surveys world civilizations since about 1700. It emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, Ociania, and the Americas. It explores the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities. It includes significant exposure to primary sources, including the canon of world literature, and requires students to interpret these critically, using creative scholarly research. It also introduces students to historical thinking and methodology. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Program

HON244 Topics in Literary Classics (3-0-3)

This course extends and refines skills of literary analysis and interpretation. It emphasizes study within a specific literary tradition, but the thematic focus of the course varies. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Program

HON250 Research Seminar (3-0-3)

This is the first course in a two-course sequence that serves as an interdisciplinary, capstone seminar for students in the Liberal Arts Honors Program. The first course introduces students to the methodologies and interpretive practices of two complementary disciplines. It considers disciplinary knowledge-making and methodologies and investigates how these disciplines might combine for a richer understanding of the topic at hand. Also, in the first semester, students develop a prospectus for an interdisciplinary research paper or project in which they hone their research and critical thinking skills. In the second semester, they complete the paper or project. The thematic focus of the capstone course varies. Course content emphasizes the relationships of knowledge in any combination of the Liberal Arts, and it provides a broad survey of the topic. The two semesters of the course are team taught by professors representing two complementary disciplines. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Concentration

HON255 Capstone Seminar (3-0-3)

This is the second course in a two-course sequence that serves as an interdisciplinary, capstone seminar for students in the Liberal Arts Honors Program. In the first semester, students develop a prospectus for a research paper or project. In the second semester, they complete the paper or project. Whereas the first course introduces students to the methodologies and interpretive practices of two complementary disciplines, this course emphasizes the practice of interdisciplinary scholarship and asks students to synthesize and integrate the disciplinary perspectives they developed in the first course. The thematic focus of the capstone course varies. Course content emphasizes the relationships of knowledge in any combination of the Liberal Arts, and it provides an in-depth study of the few texts to which students were introduced in the first semester. Professors representing two complementary disciplines team-teach both semesters. PR: HON 250

TAT121 Introduction to the Hospitality Industry (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the basic principles of the hospitality and tourism industry. Topics include the economic, social, and cultural impact of the industry on the global marketplace. The course covers the components of the hospitality and tourism industry and their interdependence. F, S

TAT133 Airline Reservation and Ticketing (3-0-3)

This course studies domestic and international airline history and ticketing. The impacts of world events (terrorism, consolidation and economics) on the airline industry are studied. Creating passenger name records, inquiry into seat availability, airline schedules, airfares and reservations are executed through computer simulation. Students learn industry specific terms and jargon used by the airlines, travel agents, and tour operators. Current events in the airline industry are discussed. F

TAT140 Event Management (3-0-3)

This course explores the logistics involved in event planning. Scope and size of events will be examined in detail. Topics include concept, design, feasibility, marketing, financial management, risk management, staging, staffing, leadership, ethics, safety and security, and careers in this area of the hospitality industry.

TAT231 Directed Study in Travel, Tourism, (3-0-3)

This course provides students with the opportunity for concentrated study, observation and work in the area of individual interest in the field of Tourism and Hospitality Management. An instructor- approved internship is required. This practical experience will better prepare students to enter a career in Tourism and Hospitality Management. PR: TAT 121 and HOT 276 S

HOT111 Food Preparation I (2-2-3)

This course presents the basic principles of food preparation for hotel, restaurant and industrial food catering establishments. Instructional methods include lectures, demonstration and student participation. Topics covered include the theory and preparation of basic stocks, soups, mother and minor sauces, clarification of stock, consommes, vegetables, salads and salad dressings. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. F, S

HOT112 Food Preparation II (2-2-3)

This course presents more advanced techniques of food preparation. Instructional methods include lectures, demonstration and student participation. Topics covered include the theory and preparation of beef, poultry, shellfish, finfish and breakfast foods. Also included are nutritional menu items. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 111 S

HOT114 Food Administration and Menu Planning (3-0-3)

This course presents the role of the menu in any food service operation. The course focuses on factors used in the hospitality industry to determine the selling price of food and beverage in relation to their initial food cost. Particular attention is directed to the importance of the menu in a successful food service operation. Topics covered include menu-rating criteria, truth-in-menu, sales mix, food costing, menu pricing, menu layout guidelines and design, demographic studies, and descriptive terminology. F

HOT116 Lodging Management and Operations (3-0-3)

Lodging Management and Operations is designed to afford the student with a detailed look into the important role that housekeeping plays in effective hotels and resorts. The course covers how to efficiently care for guestrooms and public spaces; purchasing; safe storage of wares, amenities and chemicals; and procedures to ensure a comfortable and pleasant guest experience. Particular attention is given to identifying various cleaning chemicals and equipment used in the housekeeping department and evaluating their effectiveness. Instruction is provided in the proper use of the chemicals and equipment requried to maintain guest and public spaces. The course covers retention to staff.

HOT117 Food and Beverage Control (3-0-3)

This course concentrates on methods and procedures to make a hospitality business profitable or solvent. The course details the flow of goods, including inventory, forecasting, purchase specifications, purchasing, receiving, storing, inventory control, and issuing of food and beverages. Emphasis is placed on recognizing, calculating, and exploring cost control procedures. These control procedures will include menu pricing, calculating food, beverage, and labor cost percentages and interpreting the results. Food and beverage financial statements will be prepared and examined to assist in creating a solvent business.

HOT119 Elements of Baking (2-2-3)

This course provides an introduction to basic principles of baking including formula procedures, measurements, properties of baking ingredients, and the function and proper use of equipment. The course provides practical experience in the preparation of breads, rolls, pies, cookies, quick breads, cakes, and icings. The course emphasizes the basic techniques and procedures of baking. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. F, S

HOT120 Beverage Management (1-1-1)

This course will provide the student with the basic skills to work at and manage a bar which serves alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. It will introduce the student to the basic production processes and varieties of alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. The course will explain laws and procedures related to responsible alcohol service. Students will become certified through a national exam administered through the Training Intervention Program for Servers of Alcohol (TIPS) program. S

HOT125 Cakes and Cake Decorating (2-2-3)

This course provides students with instruction and hands-on practice in the production and decoration of cakes using commercial baking techniques. Cake mixing methods will include two-stage, creaming, and sponge techniques. Decorating instruction will begin with lettering, borders, and simple flowers and will progress to the decoration and assembly of tiered wedding cakes. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the Dept. of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 119 S

HOT131 Math for Food Service Records (3-0-3)

This course emphasizes math principles used in the culinary profession. It is the basis for understanding and using math to convert recipes to prepare food in cooking and baking courses. The math taught in this course includes the basics that must be understood in order to solve problems in culinary management. Topics include basic math skills, identifying the dividend, place value, weights and measures, percentages, recipe conversions, recipe yields, baker's percentage, portion control, item costing, metric measurements and ordering of food and beverages.

HOT132 Sanitation Techniques (2-0-2)

This course emphasizes the importance of proper sanitation techniques in the food service industry. Special emphasis will be placed upon proper food handling techniques. Topics covered will be HACCP, food-borne illnesses, proper cooking, handling and storage of food, the knowledge of correct temperatures to prevent food contamination, and safe personal hygiene for food handlers. Successful completion of a test will result in a food service sanitation procedures certification awarded by the Educational Foundation of the National Restaurant Association. F, S

HOT217 Front Office Management (3-0-3)

This course deals with the study of the front office practices and procedures, including duties of room clerk, reservation clerk, cashier, night auditor and concierge. Topics covered include room assignment controls, reservations, confirmations, security controls and registration. Duties of the night auditor are studied and practiced through completion of an accounting audit. F

HOT218 Human Resources Mgt in the Hospitality and Food Industries (3-0-3)

This course explores the basic management responsibilities in the hotel and restaurant industry. Special emphasis is placed on human relations, motivation, delegation of authority, and the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively use and coordinate human resources. This course discusses the implementation of strategies, plans and programs required to attract, motivate, develop, reward and retain the best people to meet the organizational goals and operational objectives of the hospitality enterprise. S

HOT220 Wines of the World (3-0-3)

This course concentrates on the basics of wine appreciation. Topics include deciphering and analyzing wine labels and using this information in wine purchasing. Activities include researching food and wine pairing for compatibility. Other activities include testing and comparing wines of Europe and South and North America, including, but not limited to, wines from France, Chile, Canada, California, and New York. Students with a medical condition or with religious beliefs that prevent them from consuming alcohol, may, after receiving approval from the Dean of Hotel, Culinary Arts & Tourism, substitute another HOT or TAT course in place of HOT 220.

HOT225 Commercial Baking I (2-3-3)

This course introduces students to the management and operation of a commercial retail bakery. Through a combination of lectures and labs, students will acquire the manual skills and product knowledge necessary to produce and market a range of products. The students in the class will be rotated through seven production stations and one sales/ packaging position to operate the College's Pane e Dolci bakery. The production stations are: quick breads, yeasted bread, rich dough breakfast items, laminated breakfast pastry, cookies and candy, tarts and pies, and cheesecake and cakes. Emphasis is placed on scratch baking, but students also work with mixes, bases, and frozen dough products. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the NYS Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 119

HOT226 Commercial Baking II (2-3-3)

The class is a continuation of HOT-225 Commerical Baking I and will build upon the techniques learned previously. Students will learn about merchandising and sales, ingredient function, and baking chemistry through lectures and bakery visitations. Students will gain experience in puff pastry, e`clair paste, breads and rolls, flatbreads, bagels, doughnuts, tarts, and petit fours sec as they bake for the College's Pane e Dolci Bakery. A rotation through all stations in the bake shop will ensure that students gain production experience in all of these areas as well as practical experience in sales and marketing. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the New York State Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 225

HOT233 Basic Principles of Nutrition (3-0-3)

This course will provide an introduction to the basic principles of nutrition as they pertain to the food service industry. The central focus is on the relationship of food intake to the physical and mental well-being of the guest. Topics covered include: what constitutes a healthy diet, the knowledge of nutrient content, food additives, food fads, nutritional labeling, and nutritional needs for special groups. Food service menus will be analyzed for their nutritional value. F, S

HOT238 Dining Room Management and Operations (3-0-3)

Students gain experience in basic restaurant procedures and tableside preparation. Studying under the super- vision of a managing instructor, students participate in the operation of an a la carte restaurant. Students are rotated in the following job positions: manager, assistant manager, reservation manager, service staff, cashier and dishroom operations manager. Emphasis is placed upon proper American a la carte service techniques. Students are required to have a professional wait person's uniform to participate in class. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. F, S

HOT251 Quantitative Foods (2-3-3)

This is a course in the preparation and service of a complete banquet menu. Students prepare meals for nonprofit groups that hold their banquets on campus. Both American and ethnic cuisines are prepared in American Banquet Style cooking. Quality and quantity cooking is emphasized, as well as proper plating techniques. Special attention is given to the correct and efficient service techniques for banquets. Planned menus include appetizers, salads, entrees, desserts and beverages. Students are given station assignments by the student chef. The proper use of kitchen equipment is taught. The time element to complete an individual banquet will vary according to menu items and guest requirements. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 111 F, S

HOT253 Banquet Management and Operations (2-3-3)

This course emphasizes the application of banquet and catering principles. Serving and managing banquets will be emphasized. American, Russian and Buffet services will be covered. Banquet sanitation is also covered, including proper dishroom operation. Students will be required to demonstrate their proficiency by managing, serving and washing dishes for on-premise banquets. The time element to complete an individual banquet will vary according to menu items and guest requirements. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional wait person's uniform to participate in class. F, S

HOT255 Garde Manger (2-3-3)

This course presents the basic principles of Grande Manger for hotel, restaurant and industrial food catering establishments. Topics covered include charcuterie and salumi found in various cultures, hors d'oeuvre and canapes, decorative centerpieces, and cheese production and use in recipes. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 111 F

HOT256 Advanced Garde Manger and Meat Cutting (2-3-3)

This course presents the discipline of garde manger and meat cutting. The class builds upon the knowledge of charcuterie and preserved meat and vegetable products learned in HOT 255 to produce products for commercial production. The class introduces commercial meat fabrication utilizing commercial cuts from whole carcasses according to the guidelines established in the NAMPS Meat Buyers Guide for use in the College's commercial dining facilities. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 255

HOT257 Classical Cuisine I (2-4-4)

Students are assigned to a fully-equipped, modern, professional kitchen. Full course a la carte menus are produced according to the seasonal availability of fresh foodstuffs in a planned schedule of progressively more difficult menus. Special emphasis is placed on the pressure of "line cooking." Menus for this course are composed of continental dishes, including variations of basic formulas and the transformation of fundamental food products to new and diversified dishes. Students are assigned cooking stations of the traditional kitchen system and function as chef, sous chef, saucier, rotisseur and tournament. Students in this class will be preparing and cooking food for the College's restaurant, which is open to the general public. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 112 or consent of department F

HOT258 Classical Cuisine II (2-4-4)

This course is a continuation of Classical Cuisine I. Menus prepared are composed of more elaborate continental dishes and international cuisine. Students in this class will be preparing and cooking food for the College's restaurant, which is open to the general public. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 112 or consent of department S

HOT259 Regional American Baking and Pastry (2-3-3)

This course introduces the basic theory, techniques and recipes of classical pastry making. Students will produce regional desserts, pastries, and breads from across the United States to be served in the Casola dining room and the Pane e Dolci bake shop. A variety of decorating techniques will be taught and utilized to finish the cakes and pastries. Proper use of baking tools and equipment is also covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the NYS Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 119 F

HOT260 International Baking and Pastry (2-3-3)

This course provides students with the opportunity to expand and refine their baking skills and builds upon the methods learned in previous baking classes. Students will produce breads and desserts to be served in the Casola dining room and the Pane e Dolci bake shop. The emphasis is on European baking, though baked goods from other parts of the world may be included as well. Advanced techniques in cake decorating, chocolate work, and sugar boiling are also covered. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the NYS Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 259 S

HOT268 Modern Culinary Trends and Techniques (1-3-3)

This course presents a variety of modern culinary- industry trends and techniques. It covers the role of the five senses, the four basic tastes (salty, sweet, sour, and bitter), seasonings, texture, temperature, and balance. The course requires students to taste and to evaluate a range of ingredients found in the contemporary professional kitchen and discover ingredients and flavors from Asian and African menus. Modern techniques and equipment found in today's professional kitchens will be used. Sanitary practices and compliance with laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in class. PR: HOT 112

HOT269 Culinary Competition (2-3-3)

This course covers the skills sets essential for culinary competition including time management, sense of urgency, and multi-tasking. The guidelines set by the American Culinary Federation for hot and cold food competition are covered. This class offers culinary competition during the semester. This course requires class work outside the normal course schedule to prepare for and participate in two competitions during the semester. Sanitary practices and compliance with the laws and ordinances of the Department of Health are enforced. Students are required to have a professional chef's uniform to participate in this class. PR: HOT 255, consent of instructor

HOT275 Marketing for the Hospitality Profession (3-0-3)

This course concentrates on marketing for the profitability of a hospitality business. A focus of the course is the development, writing, and completion of a marketing plan for an existing business. Areas of marketing that are highlighted are pubilc relations, publicity, advertising, and sales. SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis for a hospitality business is covered. Current and emerging trends of electronic media will be introduced and analyzed for their impact in the hospitality profession.

HOT276 Meetings and Convention Management (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to the convention, group-meeting and trade-show industry. Emphasis will be on identifying the various convention, group-meeting and trade- show markets and their unique requirements. It includes an exploration of promotional activities, negotiations, sales, contracts and convention services, as well as various career paths within the industry. S

HOT277 Planning and Development of Tourism (3-0-3)

This course explores the basics in tourism planning and development. Topics include protecting environmental and cultural assets; minimizing culture shock between host and guest; enhancing, not detracting from local ways of life; and guaranteeing future populations the ability to enjoy the experience of travel. Emphasis is placed on an understanding of tourism development as it relates to economics, business, ecology, government, law, psychology and sociology. F

HOT291 Computers for the Hospitality Industry (3-0-3)

This course will diminish the mystery about computers as they relate to the hospitality industry. Its main focus will be on purpose, application, and benefits of the computer to the hospitality executive. Students will become familiar with word processing and spreadsheet programs currently being used in the industry. Students will be required to complete assignments using the available hardware and software. F, S

HOT296 Hotel/Culinary Experimental (4-4-5)



HOT999 Hotel Elective (0-0-4)



HUS133 Child Maltreatment: Prevention, Investigation,Treatment (3-0-3)

This course focuses on a cross-disciplinarian perspective of child abuse and neglect by investigating such factors as possible causes, manifestations, and prevention techniques. This course examines the role of the mandated reporter as well as laws and legislation regarding child maltreatment. It also emphasizes methods and strategies used by professionals to work with children and families in abusive and neglectful situations. A service learning advocacy experience is required.

HUS150 Introduction to Chemical Abuse and Dependency (3-0-3)

This course examines alcoholism and substance abuse from historical, biological, psychological, social and cultural perspectives. It presents theoretical frameworks that help students understand the nature and course of chemical abuse and dependency, as well as strategies to prevent its onset. The course introduces the assessment and diagnostic process as well as treatment approaches. F

HUS157 Substance Abuse Counseling (4-0-4)

This course will focus on alcoholism and substance abuse/dependency counseling. Current research, theoretical models, and methods in the treatment process will be examined. The practical development of counseling skills will be emphasized. This course can be used as a social science elective. PR: HUS 150

HUS221 Field Instruction I (0-0-3)

This course provides students with an initial, structured and supervised direct practice experience in a public or private institution, supervised by a qualified professional. It requires a minimum of 108 hours of field work and nine classroom hours of instruction, integrating and reinforcing social work theories. This course is graded as pass/fail. PR: SOC 125, SOC 127 and Human Services major with a 2.0 minimum gpa

HUS222 Field Instruction II (0-0-3)

This course provides students with a second structured and supervised direct practice experience in a public or private institution, supervised by a qualified professional. This course focuses on similar topics in Field Instruction I, at a more in-depth level. It requires a minimum of 108 hours of field work and nine classroom hours of instruction, integrating and reinforcing social work theory. This course is graded pass/fail. PR: HUS 221 and Human Services major with a 2.0 minimum gpa

HUS225 Integration of Theory and Field I/Chemical Dependency (4-0-4)

This course provides students with an initial opportunity at a local agency to obtain experience within the field of chemical dependency. The seminar class integrates field practice with theory and emphasizes the student's role and responsibilities, the agency's relationship to the larger community and the human service process. The field experience, minimum of 150 clock hours, takes place in a New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) certified chemical dependency agency, under the supervision of a qualified health professional. If a signed internship contract is not submitted by the end of the fifth week of classes, the studnet is required to withdraw from the course. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. PR: HUS 157 Substance Abuse Counseling, Minimum GPA 2.0 and permission of division PR/CR: HUS 250 Planning Assessment and Treatment

HUS226 Integration of Theory and Field II/Chemical Dependency (4-0-4)

This course provides students with a second opportunity at a local agency to obtain experience within the field of checmial dependency. The seminar class integrates field practice with theory and emphasizes the student's roles and responsibilities, the agency's relationship to the larger community, and the human service process. The field experience, a minimum of 150 clock hours, takes place in a New York State Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS) certified chemical dependency agency, under the supervision of a qualified health professional. If a signed contract is not submitted by the end of the fifth week of classes, the student is required to withdraw from the course. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. PR: HUS 225 Chemical Dependency Internship and Seminar, a minimum gpa 2.0, and permission of the division

HUS250 Planning, Assessment, and Treatment (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the major theories and methods employed in the assessment and treatment of substance abuse and addictive illnesses. It explains the processes, procedures, and tools required to effectively assess and evaluate clients in developing an individualized plan of treatment. The course stresses the Office of Alcohol and Substance Abuse Services (OASAS)12-Core Functions of the Certified Alcohol and Substance Abuse Counselor (CASAC), enabling students to create treatment plans that consider the needs of special populations, ethical concerns, treatment models and clinical strategies. PR: HUS 150

HUS254 Pharmacology of Psychoactive Drugs (3-0-3)

This course examines how alcohol and other psychoactive drugs affect the body, the brain, behavior, and influences all areas of human development. Psychoactive drug categories are discussed with emphasis on the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of drug action. Current theories about the etiology of major psychological and addictive disorders and the rationale for substance abuse drug treatment are examined. The characteristics and needs of special treatment populations are also examined. PR: HUS 150

HUS255 Alcohol and Substance Abuse: Prevention/Education (3-0-3)

This course will focus on prevention education as it relates to the individual, family and community in general. It examines the core components of the creation and implementation of culturally relevant substance abuse prevention education at variouis levels from pre-school to adult, and requires students to complete the New York State Mandated Reporter training for preventing and reporting child abuse.

ITA121 Elementary Italian I (3-0-3)

This course is designed for beginners or for those with one year of high school Italian. It provides an introduction of the Italian language through the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. It also examines Italian culture. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab; students are required to complete five documented hours of lab work outside of class.

ITA122 Elementary Italian II (3-0-3)

This course is designed for students who have completed Elementary Italian I, or two years of high school Italian. It continues the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills covered in Elementary Italian I. The course continues to provide an understanding of the civilization, culture and customs of Italy. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab; students are required to complete five documented hours of lab work outside of class. PR: ITA 121 or two years of high school Italian

ITA222 Intermediate Italian I (3-0-3)

This course develops audio-lingual and grammatical skills in Italian, placing an increased emphasis on the student's reading skills and grammatical usage. Composition writing, reading and speaking exercises are stressed, and Italian civilization is studied in detail. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: ITA 122 or permission of instructor

ITA224 Intermediate Italian II (3-0-3)

A continuation of Intermediate Italian I, this course completes a review of grammatical structures. It focuses on the refinement of communication skills through the use of prepared oral reports and discussion of Italian culture to increase the student's skill and confidence. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: ITA 222 or permission of instructor

ITA999 Italian Elective (3-0-3)



LIT210 Children's Literature (3-0-3)

This course examines literature written for children from preschool through adolescence. It explores a variety of genres and forms and traces the historical development of literature for children. Students interpret literature from multiple perspectives and examine illustrations in terms of their relationship to the text. PR: ENG 123

LIT211 Native American Literature (3-0-3)

This course will introduce students to the large and diverse array of literature produced by Native Americans in North America, from pre-contact oral literature to contemporary writings in English. Genres studied will include any or all of the following: myths; chants, ceremonies, and rituals; songs; speeches; personal narratives; essays; poems; short stories and novels. The course will concentrate on post-contact literature, especially on the issues faced by men and women of native descent in the United States. PR: ENG 123

LIT212 Literature of the Hudson-Mohawk (3-0-3)

This course explores the rich and diverse cultural and literary heritage of the Hudson-Mohawk Region as well as its geography and history. Students will read works that are either set in the Hudson-Mohawk Region or written by authors who lived within the region. They will also undertake research to uncover more of the region's literature. PR: ENG 123

LIT214 Black Literature (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the large and diverse array of literature produced by Africans and African Americans in North America, from slavery to the modern period. Genres studied include fiction (novels and short stories), drama, poetry and song, and non-fiction prose. The course emphasizes the ways in which African and African American authors have articulated and responded to issues of identity and empowerment within the Euro-American context. PR: ENG 123

LIT215 Introduction to Poetry (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to poetic genres, forms, and modes. It fosters appreciation for and critical analysis of poetry and acquaints students with the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of that poetry. This course also introduces students to poetics, prosody, and poetry criticism. PR: ENG 123

LIT216 Mythology (3-0-3)

This course will introduce students to selected major myths, and to representative or noteworthy minor myths, which various cultures have created in their efforts to come to terms with perceived reality. The course will also explore the belief systems which underlie those myths. The course also will enable students to recognize the continued value and relevance of myth and myth-making. PR: ENG 123

LIT220 Women's Literature (3-0-3)

This course explores the contributions of women authors to literature in diverse eras, cultures and nations. In addition to investigating such issues as the literary canon and the roles played by race, ethnicity, class, sexual orientation, and cultural context, the course introduces students to feminist literary theory and feminist literary criticism. PR: ENG 123

LIT221 Hispanic Literature of the Western Hemisphere (3-0-3)

This course provides a survey of major authors and literary works originating in Hispanic culture, and examines their global impact. The selection of authors and texts (in translation, when appropriate) introduces students to diverse geographical, political, and cultural climates that exist within the border of the Hispanic community -- a community that includes Central and South America, the Caribbean, Mexico, Puerto Rico, and portions of the U.S. In addition, course texts inform students of the historical background, extensive influence, and continuing impact of Spanish colonization of the Western Hemisphere. PR: ENG 123

LIT223 The Detective in Fiction and Film (3-0-3)

In this course students study the history and development of detective fiction. They read and analyze works of detective fiction from a variety of historical periods and view and analyze some of the genre's pivotal films. Discussions focus upon the elements of fiction as they apply to this genre, the historical, societal, and ethical aspects of detective fiction, and the elements of film noir. PR: ENG 123

LIT225 Contemporary World Fiction (3-0-3)

This course explores prose fiction from around the world written since the mid-twentieth century by authors of various nationalities, ethnicities, and races. It covers the aesthetic and cultural dimensions of the individual works in the context of relevant literary and cultural cross-currents. PR: ENG 123

LIT231 Drama Classics to 1870 (3-0-3)

This course surveys works of world dramatic literature from the ancient Greeks to the nineteenth century. It examines characteristic values and styles of the Classical, Medieval, Early Modern, Baroque, and Romantic periods in their tragic, comic, and mixed modes. PR: ENG 124

LIT233 Drama Classics:Modern and Contemporary (3-0-3)

This course surveys major schools of dramatic literature from the latter 19th to the 21st century, e.g. Realism, Naturalism, Expressionism, Symbolism, Epic Theater, Surrealism, Absurdism, Post- Modernism. It places primary emphasis on the works, theories, and influences of major European and American dramatists. PR: ENG 124

LIT252 British Literature Before 1800 (3-0-3)

This course surveys works of British literature from its origins in pre-Norman England through the eighteenth century. It fosters students' appreciation for literature and their acquaintance with texts written in English during the years of this survey; introduces them to the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these texts; and hones their critical thinking skills in the analysis of literature. PR: ENG 124 or HON 124 F

LIT254 British Literature Since 1800 (3-0-3)

This course surveys works of British literature from the eighteenth-century to the present. It fosters students' appreciation for literature and their acquaintance with texts written in English during the years of this survey; introduces them to the historical, intellectual, and cultural contexts of these texts; and hones their critical thinking skills in the analysis of literature. PR: ENG 124 or HON 124 S

LIT256 American Literature to 1865 (3-0-3)

This course surveys writing in America from pre-colonial times through 1865, focusing on how the historical growth of the country contributed to the emergence of a distinctly American literature. The course will cover key literary figures and movements within the diverse range of American literary history, including those historically under- represented. PR: ENG 124 F

LIT258 American Literature Since 1850 (3-0-3)

This course surveys American Literature from 1865 through the present, focusing on the growing diversity in authorship and formal experimentation during this period. Literature by key literary figures, representative of major movements, will be examined. The course will also introduce more experimental works and emerging authors. PR: ENG 124 S

LIT260 The American Short Story (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the American short story as a literary form. It emphasizes the diversity of the form by looking at a variety of early, modern, and contemporary short stories from a variety of regions, cultures, and ethnic groups. It analyzes the formal elements of short fiction and also focuses on its social, cultural, and historical contexts.

LIT266 Literary Science Fiction (3-0-3)

This course provides an introductory exploration of the literary genre of science fiction. It identifies the thematic and formal characteristics of the genre, and traces its development from and relationship to other forms of literature and the history of science. PR: ENG 123 and either ENG 124 or HON 124

MGT123 Introduction to Business (3-0-3)

This introductory course gives students a broad overview of the contemporary world of business. It reviews social, economic, legal, and political forces of the global economy that influence a business manager's role and decisions. Topics include fundamentals of business and economics, business ethics/social responsibility, competing in global markets, forms of business ownership, starting and growing a business, management, marketing (product, distribution, promotion, and pricing strategies), and managing technology and information.

MGT126 Disney Human Resource Mgt (3-0-3)

The Disney Human Resource Management course explores the human resource management function in a corporate setting and focuses on the development of leadership and management skills. Topics include the selection process, employment law, labor relations, compensation, performance development, corporate training and maintaining effective environments. It is designed to familiarize participants with current human resource practices and laws that apply to their careers, regardless of their field.

MGT127 Human Resource Management (3-0-3)

This course focuses on contemporary theory and practices relating to the management of people. Topics covered include meeting human resource challenges, managing work flows, conducting job analysis, understanding equal opportunity and the legal environment, managing diversity, recruiting/selecting employees, managing separations and downsizing, managing performance, and training. In addition, the course reviews managing compensation, rewarding performance, designing and administering benefits, developing employee relations, and managing discipline.

MGT129 Labor Relations (3-0-3)

This course provides the opportunity to explore, understand and appreciate the fundamental principles and concepts of labor/management relations. It surveys the historical, legal and structural environments that influence contractual issues and labor relations behavior. Negotiation, administration and major contents of the labor agreement are closely examined. A mock negotiation of a labor/management agreement is conducted.

MGT135 International Business (3-0-3)

This course will provide a survey of the interrelationships of world business operations; an introduction to current conceptual perspectives; cultural, educational, political and economic constraints; the international financial and trade frameworks; and the problems and challenges facing the transnational corporation. PR: MGT 123

MGT213 Principles of Management (3-0-3)

This course provides an overview of the major functions of management. Emphasis is on planning, organizing, controlling, directing, and communicating. Topics include managing yourself to get things done; creative problem-solving; becoming an ethical manager; motivating for performance; developing people with coaching and feedback; handling difficult conversations and conflict, and negotiation; diversity management; and leading positive change. CR: MGT 123

MGT215 Sales and Service (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the development and demonstration of effective sales presentation techniques. Each step in the selling process (the pre-approach, the approach and presentation, the closing and follow-up) will be analyzed, discussed, and applied. Managing the customer relationship is a central theme of the course. Additional topics include the importance of customer service, understanding consumer behavior, techniques for handling difficult customers, and developing and maintaining long-term relationships with profitable customers.

MGT221 Managerial Finance (3-0-3)

This course provides an overview of the principles and quantitative techniques used in financial management. In addition, the course examines the role of the financial manager. Topics include time value of money, measures of risk, models for pricing bonds and stocks, financial analysis, capital structure, cost of capital, capital budgeting, and working capital management. Finally, the course introduces financial problem-solving using Microsoft Excel or other computer spreadsheet programs. PR: ACC 121 or 123, CIS 102 or higher and MAT 128 or higher S

MGT230 Strategic Management (3-0-3)

This strategic management course covers mission, goal, strategy formulation, strategy implementation and strategy evaluation. Various strategic techniques are introduced including industry analysis, analysis of the competitive environment, key success factors, strategic scenario analysis and SWOT analysis. Additional topics covered include strategic thinking, competitive advantage, vertical and horizontal integration, and planning horizon in a global environment. PR: MGT 135

MGT242 Entrepreneurship (3-0-3)

This course gives students a comprehensive overview of the management of small and entrepreneurial ventures. Topics covered include pursuing franchising and existing business opportunities, creating a business plan, exploring target markets, developing the right marketing mix, pricing and credit strategies, selling, and effective customer service. In addition, the course also reviews understanding and managing start-up, fixed and variable costs, managing risk, operating for success, location, facilities and layout, human resources and management, leadership, and ethical practices. PR/CR: MGT 123

MGT250 Business Internship (3-0-3)

This course provides the business student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study and field work within selected business entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience will be enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field assignments will specifically encourage the development of overall business and management skills. Field study assignments will be administered and completed on site and will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester. PR: Business or Accounting major, completion of 30 credit hours, minimum overall G.P.A. of 2.5, and permission of the department S

MGT251 Disney Co-Operative (0-0-6)

The Disney Co-Operative internship uses a directed working and learning experience to expand knowledge of successful organizational practices. This co-op is designed to meet a participant's need for an integrated experiential program that provides transferable knowledge and skills to all participants. Students work an average of 35 hours a week at Walt Disney World during the fall or spring semester. NOTE: The student is responsible for maknig the necessary transportation arrangements to Walt Disney World or Disneyland. PR: 2.0 GPA and Permission of Division

MKT223 Marketing (3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the role of marketing in organizations. Topics covered include understanding buyers and markets, strategic planning, ethics and social responsibility, e-business, business-to-business marketing, research and sales forecasting, and global marketing. In addition, the course reviews market segmentation, targeting and positioning, relationship marketing, product and service strategies, distribution, promotion, and pricing concepts/ strategies.

MKT224 Disney Marketing You (3-0-3)

The Disney College Program Marketing You Course uses directed discussion and cooperative learning experiences to both define a personal brand for career marketing and to fcus students who do not have a clear career objectives. This course is designed to maximize the Disney College program Internship experience as well as all prior/ subsequent work experience, utilizing transferable skills, including communication, customer service, problem solving, conflict resolution, decision-making, self-management, and creative thinking. Key elements of the course include a marketing plan that allows a student to develop a personal brand, 30-second comercial, resume, and networking strategy.

MAT085 Essential Algebra I (3-0-3)

Essential Algebra I prepares the student for the study of algebra. Numerical topics include operations with numbers; simple powers and roots; factoring of natural numbers; properties and order of operations; and real numbers. The course introduces basic algebraic ideas as well as graphing in the rectangular coordinate plane. Problem solving is stressed throughout the course. PR: recommendation based on placement test or equivalent SCCC courses below the 100-level are developmental in nature and the 3 credit equivalents do not satisfy degree or certificate progam requirements. All deveopmental courses are offered on a pass/fail basis.

MAT095 Essential Algebra II (3-0-3)

Essential Algebra II is a basic course in algebra. Topics include linear equations in one and two variables, graphing solutions of equations, polynomials and factoring, rational expressions and equations, and quadratic equations. PR: MAT 085, Equivalent preparation, or placement test scores SCCC courses below the 100-level are developmental in nature and the 3 credit equivalents do not satisfy degree or certificate progam requirements. All deveopmental courses are offered on a pass/fail basis.

MAT118 Technical Math (3-0-3)

This course stresses basic algebraic functions, functional notation, trigonometric functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, exponents, radicals, complex numbers, vectors and an introduction to statistics. PR: MAT 095 or equivalent

MAT124 Technical Discrete Math (3-0-3)

This course stresses the discrete mathematics needed for career programs in the technologies. Topics include sets, algorithms, truth tables, operations on functions, arithmetic of matrices, logic circuits, permutations and combinations, and trees. In addition, the course introduces the binary and hexadecimal systems. PR: Exemption from placement testing as defined by the Academic Code or placement testing scores allowing bypass of MAT 095, or successful completion of MAT 095

MAT126 Descriptive Statistics (3-0-3)

This practical statistics course focuses on simple statistical presentations common to a variety of career fields. The course focuses on the following topics: descriptive vs. inferential statistics; organizing and describing data; measures of central tendency; measures of variation; measures of the position; the normal distribution with applications; linear correlation, and regression. Students are required to work with Excel spreadsheets and should be comfortable using computers. Note: Credit for this course does not satisfy the A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements

MAT128 Algebra I (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the real number system, polynomials, solving first degree linear equations, solving linear inequalities in one variable, the Cartesian Coordinate System, graphing linear equations by point plotting, slope, equations of lines in general form and in slope-intercept form, factoring polynomials, solving polynomial equations by factoring and the zero property, rational expressions, integer exponent and problem solving. PR: CSS 120 or equivalent F,S Note: Credit for this course does not satisfy the A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements

MAT129 Algebra II with Trigonometry (4-0-4)

This course focuses on functional notation, linear functions, absolute value functions, quadratic functions and equations, other basic algebraic functions and the graphs of those basic algebraic functions with the translations of those graphs. Also included are linear equations and inequalities, methods of solving polynomial equations, the basics of radicals and rational exponents, the basics of exponential and logarithmic functions and their graphs, geometry, and right triangle trigonometry. PR: MAT 128 F,S Note: Credit for this course does not satisfy the A.A. or A.S. degree program requirements

MAT145 Mathematical Topics (3-0-3)

This course is designed to acquaint the student with various areas of mathematics. Topics may include mathematical systems, groups, logic, truth tables, Euclidean and non-Euclidean geometries, probability, statistics, and modeling with linear, quadratic, exponential, and logarithmic functions. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent

MAT147 Statistics (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the following topics: descriptive statistics, an introduction to probability, random variables and probability distributions, the binomial and normal probability distributions, sampling, estimation, hypothesis testing, chi-square distributions, linear correlation and regression. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent F, S

MAT148 College Algebra (3-0-3)

This course concentrates on the application and analysis of algebraic problems as they occur in a variety of disciplines. Topics include linear, quadratic, exponential and logarithmic functions and models and an introduction to regression analysis. Other topics include solution of equations and inequalities, sequences and matrices. Methods of proof such as algebraic derivation as well as the use of counterexamples to disprove mathematical statements are explored. PR: MAT 095 or equivalent

MAT149 Topics in Finite Mathematics (3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to topics in finite math with applications to business, social sciences, and/or life sciences. Tolpics include functions, linear functions and mathematical models, the Method of Least Squares, systems of linear equations and matrices, linear programming, sets and counting, probability, probability distributions, random variables, expected value, and Markov chains.

MAT160 Discrete Structures (3-0-3)

Topics in this course include sets, relations and functions, equivalence relations, sequences, recursively defined sequences, recursively defined sequences, recurrence relations, logic, truth tables, techniques of mathematical proof, mathematical induction, the Binominal Theorem, counting techniques, and alorithms. Also covered are graph theory and networks. Additional topics may include Boolean algebras, partial orders, and Hasse Diagrams, or basic group theory. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent

MAT167 Precalculus With Analytic Geometry (4-0-4)

This course includes the following topics: functions, inverse functions, polynomial functions, rational functions exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, graphs, polar coordinates, analytic geometry, systems of equations, sequences, and applications. Enrichment topics permitted. PR: MAT 129 or equivalent

MAT180 Calculus I (4-0-4)

This course, in the calculus of a single variable, includes, limits, continuity, derivatives of algebraic and transcendental functions, implicit differentiation, related rates, the Mean Value Theorem, antiderivatives, definite integral, and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus. The course introduces applications of differentiation such as curve sketching and optimiation problems as well as applications of integration such as area and average value. PR: MAT 167 or equivalent

MAT181 Calculus II (4-0-4)

This course, in the calculus of a single variable, concerns recognizing, analyzing, and calculating problems in the following topic areas: the calculus of inverse trigonometric functions, integration techniques, application of integration, L'Hopital's Rule, improper integrals, infinite sequences and series, plane curves, parametric equations, polar coordinates, and polar curves. PR: MAT 180 or consent of the department

MAT210 Discrete Structures: Logic & Proof (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to the non-continuous side of mathematics. The course focuses on techniques of mathematical proof including mathematical induction, direct proof,indirect proof, and proof by contradiction. Topics include relations and functions, symbolic logic and predicate calculus, number thoery, combinatorial methods as well as an introduction to graph theory. PR: MAT 180

MAT240 Calculus III (4-0-4)

Topics covered in this course include three- dimensional analytic geometry, vectors, calculus of functions of several variables, partial differentiation and multiple integration. Additionally, The Fundamental Theorem of Line Integrals and Green's Theorem, as well as vector fields are covered. PR: MAT 181

MAT242 Linear Algebra (3-0-3)

This course covers the following topics: vector spaces, the structure of Rn, matrix algebra, systems of linear equations, determinants, eigenvectors, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and applications. Linear transformations and inner product spaces are also covered. PR: MAT 180

MAT244 Differential Equations (4-0-4)

This course introduces students to techniques to solve ordinary differential equations. Topics covered are first- order differential equations and applications, higher-order linear differential equations and applications, differential equations with variable coefficients (power series), linear differential equations with constant coefficients revisited via Laplace transforms. In addition, the instructor may choose to cover numerical methods or solutions around singular points, Bessel and Legendre equations. PR: MAT 181

MUS100 Basic Ensemble (1-0-1)

This course is designed to develop skills in music reading and ensemble performance. Class time is dedicated to sight-reading music in classical, jazz, and folk styles; reading and performing rhythm and scale exercises; and preparing music for performance.

MUS106 Ear Training and Sight Singing (3-0-3)

This course develops students' vocal competencies that include matching pitches, maintaining a pitch center, sight singing, and rhythmic reading. Ear training skills, including interval and triad identification, are developed. This course is recommended as preparation for a college music degree program audition. F, S

MUS112 Music Notation Software Basics (1-0-1)

This course introduces the essential aspects of music notation using the Sibelius music-writing software program. The course covers the notation of music for single instrument and voice, as well as small and large ensembles, and includes some rudimentary concepts of music arranging. Music-writing rules and traditions for score formats, notation, lyrics, dynamic expression, and text, are studied using various input methods such as the QWERTY keyboard and MIDI keyboard. This course assumes basic music reading and computer skills on the part of the student.

MUS115 Rock Music Style and Development (3-0-3)

This course explores the development of rock music in terms of musical style and societal influence. The course covers the pre-existing styles (pop, country and western, rhythm and blues, jazz, folk, gospel and classical music) that impacted the evolution of rock music. The development of music listening skills is emphasized with directed listening exercises to reinforce concepts of musical style and elements such as rhythm, pitch, dynamics, timbre and form. The role of rock music as a social, cultural, economic and political force is examined.

MUS121 The Enjoyment of Music I (3-0-3)

This course in the appreciation of art music of the Western world examines major styles, examples of the great musical works and composers, and relationships with the other arts. The vocabulary and materials of music are presented with examples from major style periods of music. This is followed by a survey of music beginning in the Middle Ages and continuing into the 21st Century. The development of listening skills is emphasized.

MUS127 Jazz Styles and Development (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the styles and literature of jazz, a uniquely American art form, and its relationships to popular art music. The course covers jazz development, beginning with pre-jazz styles such as ragtime and blues, and proceeds to swing, bebop, cool, third stream, avant-garde, fusion and contemporary music.

MUS131 African American Music Survey (3-0-3)

This appreciation and literature course is a survey of African American musical genres and styles. Topics of study range from the slave and folk songs of 19th century America to the popular and classical compositions of the 20th and 21st century African Americans. An emphasis will be placed on the development of listening skills.

MUS135 Applied Music I (1-0-2)

Applied Music I is designed to enable the student to achieve basic competencies in performance. Students will study techniques and repertoire (with a private instructor) appropriate to the individual student's instrument or voice. The course is designed for personal musicianship enrichment. The course is also designed to prepare students for a college degree program entrance audition. F, S

MUS136 Applied Music II (1-0-2)

Applied Music II is designed to enable the student to achieve basic competencies in performance. Students will study technique and repertoire (with a private studio instructor) appropriate to the individual student's instrument or voice. The course is designed for personal musicianship enrichment. The course is also designed to prepare students for a college degree program entrance audition. F, S

MUS147 Music Fundamentals (3-0-3)

The basic course in fundamentals of tonal music is designed to develop competencies in the reading and writing of notes, scales, key signatures, intervals, chords, and rhythmic elements. F, S

MUS151 Theory I (2-0-2)

Theory I covers the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, modes, triads, seventh chords and cadences. This course prepares the student for more detailed analysis of rhythm, texture, and form, with an emphasis on basic harmony and eighteenth century voice leading practices. PR: Acceptance into music degree program CR: MUS 155 F

MUS152 Theory II (2-0-2)

Theory II builds on the concepts of Theory I and covers the 18th century voice leading practices, root movements and progressions, and figured bass theory usage. Dominant seventh chords and non-dominant seventh chords are introduced. Also included are secondary dominants, modulation, application of cadential formulas, and dance forms including binary and simple ternary forms. PR: MUS 151 CR: MUS 156 S

MUS155 Aural Skills I (1-1-1)

Aural Skills I is a skills development course designed to enhance performance through the recognition, mental imaging and vocal performance of a broad range of musical structures. The course begins with the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, rhythmic patterns, intervals, modes, triads, seventh chords, cadences, and chord patterns. Students are trained to aurally recognize, notate and vocally reproduce these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing, harmonic and melodic dictation and the use of solfege as a learning and study tool. PR: Acceptance into music degree program CR: MUS 151 F

MUS156 Aural Skills II (1-1-1)

Aural Skills II is a skills development course designed to enhance performance through the recognition and mental imaging of a broad range of musical structures. It continues work in the fundamentals of tonal music: scales, rhythmic patterns, modes, triads, seventh chords, and chord patterns and introduces modulations, non-harmonic tones, inversions of seventh chords, and four-voice chord progressions and patterns. Students are trained to aurally recognize, notate and vocally reproduce these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing and the use of solfege as a learning and study tool. PR: MUS 155 CR: MUS 152 S

MUS157 Conducting I (2-0-1)

This course introduces the basic techniques and competencies of conducting: posture and hand position, baton usage, foreign and technical terms, a survey of large ensemble repertoire, metric patterns in two, three, and four, instrumental transpositions, string bowings, score reading, preparation and analysis, preparatory gestures, gestures of syncopation, fermata and caesura problems. Prepare and conduct simple scores in class and analyze orchestral and other scores. Other topics will include rehearsal technique and interpretation. PR: MUS 152, MUS 257 F

MUS158 Conducting II (2-0-1)

This course continues study of the basic conducting techniques with simple, compound, asymmetric and subdivided metric patterns, as well as rehearsal techniques and planning. Separate instrumental and choral conducting techniques are introduced. Students learn a systematic procedure for marking scores and conduct scores in class. Other topics include cuing and left hand independence, changing tempi, concert programming and interpretation. PR: MUS 157 S

MUS161 Performance Organization I (0-0-1)

MUS 161, 162, 261, 262 are the performing ensembles of the SCCC Music Department. They include the Wind Ensemble, Jazz Ensemble, Chorus, Percussion Ensemble, Guitar Ensembles, Woodwind Chamber Ensemble and Vocal Chamber Ensemble. Participation in ensembles is open to all students by audition and/or permission of the Department. PR: Audition or permission of the Department F

MUS162 Performance Organization II (0-0-1)

PR: MUS 161 or permission of the Department S

MUS163 Performance Concentration I (2-0-2)

Performance Concentration I-IV are designed to develop the student's performance and teaching skills to the highest possible level through the careful study of techniques appropriate to the individual student's instrument or voice with a private studio instructor. Practical experience in performance and critical analysis will be emphasized in the weekly performance classes with division instructors. Practical experience in formal performance will be provided in the division recital. A final performance examination is administered by a faculty panel, including the instructor, at the conclusion of MUS 164 and MUS 264. Courses must be taken consecutively. PR: Acceptance into a music degree program CR: Appropriate major ensemble

MUS164 Performance Concentration II (2-0-2)

PR: MUS 163 CR: Appropriate major ensemble

MUS167 Percussion Techniques (1-0-1)

This course is designed to familiarize music students with the fundamentals of percussion performance pedagogy. Topics and activities will include snare and other drum techniques, timpani, mallet percussion, Latin and other non-Western styles, accessories and percussion ensembles. Not applicable for percussion concentration students. PR: approved entrance audition for music degree program

MUS169 Guitar Techniques (1-0-1)

This course is designed to develop basic competencies in guitar accompaniment for classroom singing and in teaching a beginning guitar class unit within a public school general music sequence. Not applicable for guitar concentration students. PR: approved entrance audition for music degree program

MUS171 Beginning Voice Class (2-0-2)

This course presents the fundamentals of basic vocal production. Instruction in vocal technique is based upon songs and vocalizes with emphasis upon principles of breathing and placement. Beginning Voice Class is recommended for development of a foundation for the singing voice using classical vocal techniques and repertoire. F, S

MUS178 Audio Recording I (3-0-3)

This course introduces the basic elements of sound as well as sound generation and recording. The course focuses primarily on the routing of sound in a virtual mixing console environment and the principals of recording and tracking. Equipment used for tracking such as preamps, various types of microphones, compressors and limiters are introduced. This course also presents the basic Pro Tools software principles required to complete a recording project from intial set up to final mix. Industry- specific terms used by recording engineers to describe and measure sound levels and frequency content are covered. PR: MUS 147 or admission to music degree program CR: MUS 106 or MUS 151

MUS179 Audio Recording II (3-0-3)

This course builds on and is a continuation of MUS 178 Audio Recording I. Utilizing AVID ProTools software in conjunction with a Pro Control 24 automated mixing console and an Avid M-box, a variety of audio projects such as music, radio commercials, and TV commercials are undertaken. Course projects incorporate mixing and mastering techniques using multi-band compression, equalization and limiting. PR: MUS 178, admission to Music Degree program CR: MUS 152

MUS180 Introduction to Music Therapy (1-0-1)

This course is an orientation to the music therapy field. career field. It presents the historical background and philosophical bases of music therapy and functions of music therapist as a health-field professional.

MUS181 Beginning Piano (2-0-2)

This course provides group instruction for beginning level students. Students learn to read music and develop technical facility at the piano through preparation and performance of progressively difficult music. Keyboard ensemble activities provide additional opportunities for musical development. F, S

MUS182 Intermediate Piano (2-0-2)

This course provides group instruction for intermediate level students. Students further develop music skills and technical facility at the piano through preparation and performance of progressively difficult music. Keyboard ensemble activities provide additional opportunities for musical development. PR: MUS 181 or consent of department F, S

MUS195 Music Experimental (3-0-3)

This course in an introduction to the basic elements of sound as well as sound generation and recording. The course will focus primarily on the routing of sound in a virtual mixing console environment and the principles of recording and and tracking. Equipment used for tracking such as pre-amps, various types of microphones, compressors and limiters will be introduced. This course also presents the basic Pro Tools software principles required to complete a recording project from initial set up to final mix. Industry-specific terms used by recording engineers to describe and measure sound levels and frequency content will be covered. PR: MUS 152, 156

MUS230 Live Sound Reinforcement (3-0-3)

This course introduces concepts and techniques of sound amplification and reinforcement of live music. The course covers equipment selection and use, systems design, aural training for various aspects of live sound, mixing, monitors and microphone selection and placement. PR: MUS 152

MUS231 Music Business (3-0-3)

This course explores practical, legal and procedural problems encountered in the music industry with emphasis upon music merchandising, music publishing, recording, arts management, copyright law and licensing. S

MUS232 Jazz Improvisation I (2-0-2)

This course provides an introduction to the study of jazz improvisation. Topics include chord scales, modes, arpeggios and harmonic formulae. Special emphasis will be placed on common compositional structures including AABA and blues forms. Material to be studied will include jazz standards by Gershwin, Ellington, Charlie Parker, and others. PR: MUS 152

MUS235 Music Business II (3-0-3)

This course continues examination, begun in MUS 231, of practical, legal, and procedural problems encountered in the music industry with emphasis upon music publishing, recording, arts management, emerging trends and technologies, career options, artist management, and the recording industry.

MUS251 Theory III (2-0-2)

Theory III builds on the concepts of Theory II (MUS 152) and covers borrowed chords, extensions (9th, 11th, and 13th chords), Neapolitan 6th chords, augmented 6th chords, variation technique, and rondo forms. The course begins with a review of the basic concepts of Theory II. PR: MUS 152 CR: MUS 255 F

MUS252 Theory IV (2-0-2)

Theory IV builds on the concepts of Theory III (MUS 251) and covers two-voice eighteenth century counterpoint, altered dominants, chromatic mediants, enharmonic modulation, common tone diminished 7th chords. There is a focus on the analysis of sonata form. Twentieth century techniques include Impressionism, twelve-tone technique, and pitch class sets. The course includes a review of classical and romantic forms. PR: MUS 251 CR: MUS 256

MUS255 Aural Skills III (1-1-1)

This course continues with the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, rhythmic patterns, modes, triads, seventh chords, and chord patterns and includes modulations, non-harmonic tones, inversion of seventh chords and four-voice chord progressions and patterns. It adds chromatic and secondary harmonies, ninth chords and non-traditional meters. Students are trained to aurally recognize, notate and vocally reproduce these elements. The course also emphasizes sight singing and the use of solfeggio as a learning and study tool. PR: MUS 156 CR: MUS 251 F

MUS256 Aural Skills IV (1-1-1)

This course continues with the fundamentals of tonal music, scales, rhythmic patterns, modes, triads, seventh chords and chord patterns, and includes modulations, non-harmonic tones, inversion of seventh chords, four-voice chord progressions and patterns, chromatic and secondary harmonies, ninth chords, borrowed chords, altered dominant harmony, chromatic mediant harmonies, foreign modulation, and non-functional harmony. It adds Impressionist devices, 12-tone technique and other 20th century elements. The course also emphasizes sight-singing and the use of solfeggio as a learning a study tool. Preparing for transfer auditions is emphasized. PR: MUS 255 CR: MUS 252 S

MUS257 Literature and Style I (3-0-3)

Literature and Style I is a comprehensive survey of Western art music styles of the Medieval, Renaissance, Baroque, and Classic periods. PR: Successful music degree program audition CR: MUS 151, 155

MUS258 Literature and Style II (3-0-3)

Literature and Style II is a comprehensive survey of Romanitic, Twentieth Century, contemporary and jazz art music styles. PR: MUS 257 CR: MUS 152, 156

MUS261 Performance Organization III (0-0-1)

PR: MUS 162 or permission of the Department F

MUS262 Performance Organization IV (0-0-1)

PR: MUS 261 or permission of the Department S

MUS263 Performance Concentration III (2-0-2)

PR: MUS 164 CR: Appropriate major ensemble

MUS264 Performance Concentration IV (2-0-2)

PR: MUS 263 CR: Appropriate major ensemble

MUS270 Studio Literature (1-0-1)

This course is presented as a series of one-on-one sessions with the student's performance concentration instructor. The student will be guided through the study of historically, theoretically and technically significant literature for the student's concentration. Recorded performances will be studied to reinforce the student's understanding of style and performance practices. This course is intended to prepare the student for MUS 212 (Recital). The student will be guided through the process of selecting an appropriate recital program for performance in a subsequent semester. Aspects of the program may include works that feature a variety of composition and performance styles as wel as works from appropriate historical periods. PR: Approval of music department faculty and studio instructor CR: MUS 163, 164, 263 or 264 F

MUS272 Recital (1-0-1)

This course is presented in a series of one-on-one sessions with the student's performance concentration instructor. The student will be guided through the process of planning, preparing and performing a solo recital. Repertoire selections will be the end result of MUS 270, Studio Literature. In addition to the musical preparation, the student will be guided through the coordination of each aspect of the recital, from the facilities arrangements to the actual performance. PR: MUS 270 CR: MUS 163, 164, 263 or 264

MUS278 Audio Recording III (3-0-3)

This course builds on and is a continuation of MUS 179 Audio Recording II. In a live recording studio environment individual audio recording projects are formulated, designed and completed using AVID ProTools software. Course projects incorporate advanced recording, mixing, mastering, compression, and microphone techniques. PR: MUS 179

MUS280 Music Business Internship (12-0-3)

This course provides students with a structured practical experience in a professional music business environment. The experience may be in audio recording, live sound, music management, or live music production, according to students' interests. The course requires 100 hours of supervised field experience and 12 hours of classroom instruction.

MUS283 Music in Contemporary Education (3-2-3)

This comprehensive overview of the professional world of music in education deals with the process of learning; goals and objectives; bases for selection of strategies, materials, and functional techniques; and evaluative considerations within a consistent philosophical rationale related to contemporary educational environ- ment. Selected teaching opportunities and observations in school music classrooms provide resources for developing teaching foundations. Emphasis is upon school grades K-6. Thirty (30) clock hours of supervised observation in local public schools are an integral part of this course. PR: MUS 152 and 156 F

MUS284 Music in Contemporary Education II (3-1-3)

This course provides an overview of current methods, materials and practices in secondary school music instruction. The course covers all aspects of teaching music at the secondary school level, with emphasis on active learning that engages students and involves them directly in the learning process. Particular attention is given to the developmental needs and interests of secondary school students. Thirty clock-hours of supervised observation in local public schools and in-class teaching opportunities are an integral part of this course. P: MUS 152, MUS 156

MUS285 Brass Techniques (2-0-2)

This course is designed to familiarize music students with the fundamentals of brass instruments pedagogy. Topics and activities include learning to play trumpet and trombone, and class discussions and demonstrations of other instruments including horn, tuba, and euphonium. Special attention will be given to common problems of beginning level students, basic maintenance, and accessories. PR: MUS 152, MUS 156

MUS286 Woodwind Techniques (2-0-2)

This course is designed to develop basic performance and pedagogical skills for woodwind instruments. In addition to performance development, course topics include acoustics, embouchure development, breathing, instrument selection, and basic maintenance and repair. PR: MUS 152, 156 S

MUS287 Keyboard Techniques I (1-0-1)

This course develops functional keyboard skills including harmonization and accompaniment, improvisation and analysis. Course activities include music reading, performance, harmonic progressions, scales, and transposition exercises. PR: successful music degree program audition

MUS288 Keyboard Techniques II (1-0-1)

This course continues the development of functional keyboard skills including pedagogy, harmonization and accompaniment in various styles, improvisation, and analysis begun in MUS 287. Course activities include music reading, performance, harmonic progressions, scales, and transposition exercises. PR: MUS 287

MUS289 Keyboard Techniques III (1-0-1)

This course continues the development of functional keyboard skills including performance preparation, pedagogy, harmonization and accompaniment in various styles, improvisation, and analysis. Course activities include music reading, performance, harmonic progressions, major and minor scales, and transposition exercises. PR: MUS 288

MUS295 Music Experimental (3-0-3)



NMT150 Introduction to Materials Science (3-0-3)

This course is a general introduction to the study of materials: metals, ceramics, polymers, and electronic materials. This course investigates the relationship between bonding, structure (crystals and microstructure) and properties of these materials. The course examines elementary principles of thermodynamics as they apply to materials, mechanical properties of materials, and the electronic, optical and magnetic properties of materials.

NMT152 Introduction to Nanoscale Materials (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the field of nanoscale materials. Nanoscale materials have chemical and physical properties that are significantly different from those of bulk materials. Students will be able to recognize the underlying principles of the resulting size-dependent properties and the processing and fabrication of these materials at the molecular level. This course will cover the synthesis and assembly of nanoscale materials based on top-down and bottom-up approaches. The applications of nanodevices made from nanoscale materials will also be discussed. PR: NMT 150

NMT225 Introduction to Vacuum Science and Technology (3-3-4)

This hands-on laboratory course will provide an introduction to vacuum equipment and instrumentation and will consist of three major parts: 1) the basics of various pumps, including rotary pumps, dry pumps, turbo pumps, and cryo pumps; 2) the physical and chemical principles under- lying the design and use of high vacuums; and 3) vacuum measurements, leak detection, calibration and standards, and safety issues related to vacuum equipment. PR: NMT 152

NMT252 Integrated Nanotechnology Laboratory (0-3-2)

This laboratory course is designed as the second of a two-semester sequence in the field of nanoscale materials. It focuses on advanced laboratory training to demonstrate the principles of nanoscale materials technology. This laboratory will promote hands-on synthesis of nanoscale materials as well as use of characterization techniques including microscopy, and spectroscopy. Topics will include self-assembly, lithography, quantum dots, fullerenes, and functional nanomaterials. PR: NMT 152 and CHM 121

NMT254 Introduction to Semiconductor Manufacturing Technology (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the integrated circuit (IC) chip manufacturing process in semiconductor fabrication. It focuses on the newest IC fabrication technologies and describes the older technologies to provide a better understanding of the historical development. The processes studied in this course are similar to those in real fabrications, especially in process troubleshooting and process and hardware relations. PR: NMT 152

NMT280 Introduction to Thin Film Deposition and Quality Control (3-3-4)

This hand-on laboratory course will introduce thin film deposition processes, measurements, and controls in a high- tech manufacturing environment. Advanced applications such as superconductor and semiconductor processes will be used to illustrate fundamentals of thin film deposition processes. Physical vapor deposition and chemical vapor deposition will be compared and contrasted. Key measurements in thin film deposition processes and properties, both during and after deposition, will be illustrated. Process and quality controls in manufacturing will be discussed. PR: NMT 152 CR: NMT 225

CFA090 GED Extension (0-0-15)



CFA091 GED Adult Basic Extension (0-0-7)



CFA096 GED Prep (Adult Basic) (0-0-15)

This class features an applied curriculum designed to significantly improve success rates on the GED exam. Emphasis will be on assisting students with low reading and math grade levels to build basic reading, writing, and mathematical skills. Additional workbook fees may be charged.

CFA098 GED Prep Review (0-0-5)



CFA103 Entrepreneurship Training (0-0-0)



CFA112 SAT Preparation (0-0-5)

determine applicant desirability. Our highly experienced instructors will help you reduce your test anxiety with finely tuned study aids, build your vocabulary and math skills, and provide you with strategies to answer questions more effectively.

CFA119 Computer Survival I (0-0-10)

This stress-free workshop is intended for those who want to learn commonly used computer skills in the Windows operating system. Simple, non-technical explanations, combined with hands-on experience, will help you feel comfortable using a computer and learning computer basics. Topics covered include the mouse, the desktop environment, menus, how to create folders and organize your information, how to protect your computer from computer viruses, and how to use e-mail. Students will also learn to use the Internet and the basics of Microsoft Word. *STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO BRING A FLASH DRIVE TO CLASS.

CFA120 Get the Most from Internet (0-0-3)

You constantly hear "check it out on the web" but you don't know how to get started. Your instructor has posted your assignments on a website or you have registered for a distance learning course but you don't know what to do. This course introduces you to the Internet, aka the World Wide Web. Learn how to get around, bookmark your favorite sites, use search engines to conduct research, and much more.

CFA124 Day Series: MS Office 2000 (0-0-15)



CFA160 Introduction to Windows XP (0-0-5)

Students will learn how to use Microsoft's Windows consumer operating systems in this introductory course. They will learn how to maneuver, customize and control the computer, and ensure a safe computing environment. Discover Windows updates and why they should be installed. Students will also learn how to multi-task, manage folders and files, create shortcuts, how to install and use software, and much more.

CFA170 Intro to Access XP (0-0-5)

Do you need to maintain extensive data and then generate reports for analysis? Learn how to design this relational database to meet your educational and business needs. This course covers the development of a database and begins to explore how to query the data.

CFA171 Intro to Excel XP (0-0-5)

Colleges and universities require students to create, analyze and share important data quickly. This introductory course covers how to structure your spreadhseet for data input, how to create formulas, then progress to dynamically displaying the results in a custom chart. With Excel, you will get the most out of your information.

CFA172 Intro to MS Word XP (0-0-5)

This introductory course covers the basics of word processing and provides instruction on how to create attractive, appealing documents. Colleges and universities require students to prove their writing proficiency by composing numerous papers. Competent word processing skills are needed for optimum communication.

CFA173 English as a Second Language (0-0-15)

This course is designed to assist ESL (English as a Second Language) students from the community to learn to speak and write the English language. It focuses on correct pronunciation, conversational skills, writing skills, and necessary grammar lessons.

CFA174 Amer Red Cross Babysitting (0-0-2)

This course is designed for young people ages 11 and older. The topics include babysitting responsibilities, accident prevention, how to respond in an emergency situation, first aid for injuries, diapering, and feeding. Students who attend will receive an American Red Cross certification. Students should bring their own lunch.

CFA177 Intro to Read/Writing Skills (0-0-10)



CFA178 Intro Math Fundamentals (0-0-6)



CFA179 Intro to Keyboard Skills (0-0-5)



CFA183 Red Cross Inf/Chld (0-0-0)



CFA206 HR Legislative Briefing (0-0-0)



CFC100 Archaeological Research (0-0-0)



CFC185 Pupil Transportation Mgt (0-0-0)



CFD001 Anat & Phys for Dent Lab Tech (0-0-0)



CFE007 CNA Training (0-0-0)

The CNA program prepares students to take the written and practical skill exam to obtain the New York State Nursing Home Nurse Aide Certification A Certified Nurse Aide performs delegated tasks involving personal care of residents of long-term care skilled nursing facilities. The majority of CNAs are employed at geriatric nursing facilities; however CNAs are also in demand for work with pediatric and developmentally disabled residents. The SCCC/HPOG CNA course has a minimum of 90 classroom hours and a minimum of 90 classroom hours and a minimum of 30 hours of rotations in clinical sites. Included in the HPOG CNA training is an additional 40 hours of Personal Care Aide (PCA) training for those who might prefer to work in home settings. The CNA/PCA course lasts approximately 7 weeks and, to ensure success, it provides more than the requirednumber of classroom and lab hours.

CFE008 Basic Job Search Skills (0-0-0)



CFE014 Home Health Aide & Personal Care Assistant (0-0-0)

A Home Health Aide (HHA) has a scope of care services wider and more advanced than a PCA. Several times a year, we offer this standalone 4 week, 75 hour training, which includes 40 hours to reach PCA including 8 hours clinical rotations in a home care or assisted living setting. Labor market analysis projects a growing demand and high need for in-home care professionals in the next 10 years.

CFE115 Medical Terminology (0-0-0)

Interact more effectively in the medical community and increase your desirability for careers in the medical field! Positions such as medical transcriptionist/secretary, hospital clerk, insurance claims processor and EKG technician, all require a working knowledge of basic medical terminology. This course will increase your medical vocabulary and comprehension through a systematic approach to decoding medical terminology. Simple, non-technical explanations of medical terms with references to anatomy, physiology, pathology, surgical procedures, and a variety of diseases will be presented. You will learn how to read and interpret this language by identifying prefixes, suffixes and root words. Participants will also be introduced to basic EKG interpretation, with a focus on related terminology.

CFE139 Intro: Adobe PhotoShop (0-0-0)

Start working with your phots like a pro! This beginning level class will show you how to use the tools available in Adobe PhotoShop (version CS4). Students will learn to enhace their photos and how to work with layers. Weekly projects will better acquaint you with the PhotoShop environment. STUDENTS ARE REQUIRED TO BRING A FLASH DRIVE TO CLASS.

CFE141 Intro: English Horsebk Riding (0-0-0)

Take this extraordinary opportunity to get in the saddle again. Or, if you've never ridden before, you'll experience a most invogirating workout while learning proper English riding technique (the horse does not do all the work!). Horse grooming, tacking, and barn management are also taught with safety always a prime consideration. Ride in one of the Capital District's largest indoor arenas, the New Horizons Stables. For those who have always been drawn to strong, yet gentlest of creatures, now is the time.

CFE142 How to Write Short Stories (0-0-0)



CFE144 Intro to Gardening (0-0-0)



CFE166 Intro to Banjo (0-0-0)

Don't let that old banjo gather dust in the attic. Dig it out and learn how to play three fingers Scruggs-style bluegrass banjo. This is the most popular style used today in bluegrass and country music alike. This course is designed for teh absolute beginner. There is no need for the student to be able to read music since the stand form of music notation is not used for learning the banjo. This course will consist of instructor demonstrations, individual practice sessions and one-on-one help from the instructor. No one will be asked to play anything by themselves in front of the class. *Each student will need to bring a 5 string banjo, a plastic thumb pick and 2 metal finger picks. All other material will be provided by the instructor, including a CD of the entire course.

CFE202 NYS Safe Boating for Children (0-0-0)



CFE204 NYS Safe Boating (0-0-0)



CFE324 Creative Mixology (0-0-0)

This course will provide you with the basic skills you need to work at and manage a bar that serves alcoholic and non-alcoholic beverages. It will introduce you to basic production processes and varieties of alcoholic beverages. Laws and procedures related to responsible alcohol service will be explored and reviewed. Students will become certified through the Training and Intervention Program for Servers of Alcohol (TIPS). MATERIALS FEE: $20 TIPS BOOKLET TO BE PURCHASED IN THE BOOKSTORE PRIOR TO CLASS.

CFE325 Wine Exploration and Tasting (0-0-0)

The topic of wine tasting can be daunting. With this course, you will feel much more comforable with not only discussing but tasting with confidence. Discussion and tasting in each class will allow you to explore the topic from the fruit to the process, to the service, and pairing with foods. Over eight weeks, we will cover white wines (Chardonnay, Pinot Grigio, Riesling), red wines (Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot, Chianti, Pinot Noir) and Sparkling/Champagne.

CFE341 Prof Baking for Children (0-0-0)

Join Chef Gail Sokol on a baking and cooking extravaganza that will focus on measurement, correct sanitation, and mixing methods. Young chefs (ages 10-13 years) will learn to make a variety of different delicious dishes that students will get to bring home and share with family and friends! For information on the recipes that will be made, please contact Workforce Development at (518) 381-1315 or visit our website at: http://www.sunysccc.edu/academic/acadser/webreg.htm#summer. YOUNG CHEFS ARE ASKED TO BRING AN APRON, CLOSED TOE SHOES, A WATER BOTTLE AND A BAGGED LUNCH.

CFE351 Prof Cooking for Children (0-0-0)

Come join chef Gail Sokol for a Cooking extravaganza. Young chefs will learn to prepare cheese puffs, macaroni and cheese, pot stickers, chicken piccata, quiche Lorraine, cornbread, herbed flatbread, and more. Proper measuring skills, sanitation, and kitchen science will be emphasized. Each young chef should bring an apron and wear closed-toed shoes.

CFE352 Cooking for Adults (0-0-0)

Students will be making pastries using Danish dough, quick breads, chocolate pound cake, various pies and cookies. Topics include proper sanitation, weights and measurements. Please bring an apron to class.

CFE354 Professional Cooking for Teens (0-0-0)

Join Chef Gail Sokol on a baking and cooking extravaganza that will focus on measurement, correct sanitation, and mxiing methods. Young chefs (ages 10-13 years) will learn to make a variety of different delicious dishes that students will get to bring home and share with family and friends! For information on the recipes that will be made, please contact Workforce Development at (518) 381-1315 or visit our website at: http://www.sunysccc.edu/academic/acadser/webreg.htm#summer. YOUNG CHEFS ARE ASKED TO BRING AN APRON, CLOSED TOE SHOES, A WATER BOTTLE AND A BAGGED LUNCH. ,

CFE355 Prof Cooking Par & Kids (0-0-0)



CFE356 Splendid Soups (0-0-0)



CFE357 Classic French Bistro Cooking (0-0-0)



CFE358 Intro Baking Yeast Breads (0-0-0)

This is a hands-on class that will take the mystery out of baking with yeast. Each student will mix, shape, bake and take home two loaves of crusty Italian bread. Students will learn the necessary techniques to prepare yeast breads at home. *All students must come dressed to bake with an apron, a hair band or hat to restrain their hair and closed toed shoes.

CFE359 Artisan Bread Techniques (0-0-0)



CFE360 Secrets of Sourdough (0-0-0)



CFE361 Amer Regional BBQ (0-0-0)



CFE362 Wine Tast:Ital Wines & Cheese (0-0-0)

Come learn about the various wine regions of Italy as well as the different cheeses. Students will taste a variety of wines and cheeses from Italy and gain confidence in selecting wines and cheeses for your next party.

CFE363 French Cuisine:Provence (0-0-0)

Come discover the cuisine of Provence, France; a cuisine highly influenced by vegetables, seafodd, lamb and its neighbor Italy. Students will learn to make light and healthy dishes from this region such as Soupe au Pistou, Bouillabaisse, Ratatouille, Ragout of New Potatoes, Artichokes with Garlic and herbs, Provencal Vegetable Tart and Herbes de Provence Grilled Lamb Chops.

CFE364 Asian Cuisines:Japan (0-0-0)



CFE365 Wine Tasting:Spanish (0-0-0)

Come learn about the various wine regions of Spain, as well as its cheeses. Students will taste a variety of wines and cheeses from Spain.

CFE366 Vegetarian Cookery (0-0-0)



CFE367 Cook from Green Market (0-0-0)

Buying and eating locally has become one of the most popular trends. Schenectady and the Capital District as a whole have not been excluded from this trend. Come spend some time with Chef Christopher and learn about the Schenectady Green Market, pick out some produce as part of the class and travel back to the SCCC kitchens to learn how to prepare some delicious, seasonal healthy meals.

CFE368 Celebrate the Harvest (0-0-0)



CFE369 Healthy Chinese Takeout (0-0-0)



CFE370 Cupcake Party (0-0-0)



CFE371 Muffin Madness (0-0-0)



CFE372 Fun with Frittatas (0-0-0)



CFE373 Intro to Domestic Adoption (0-0-0)



CFE374 Conv Mandarin Chinese (0-0-0)



CFE375 Pizzeria Pizza for Home (0-0-0)

Learn to make professional quality pizzas in your home kitchen. Students will learn about the variety of doughs, sauces and toppings that can be used to make great pizza. The class will prepare a variety of different pizza doughs. Every student will have the opportunity to shape, top and bake several pizzas. Although the class will utilize professional ovens, we will discuss techniques for duplicating the results in your own oven. *All students must come dressed to bake with an apron, a hair band or hat to restrain their hair and closed toed shoes.

CFE376 Artisan Breads for Home (0-0-0)



CFE377 Polish Cuisine (0-0-0)



CFE378 German Cuisine (0-0-0)



CFE379 Savory Sweets (0-0-0)



CFE380 Korean Cuisine (0-0-0)



CFE381 Pastries and Desserts (0-0-0)



CFE382 Flatbreads Around the World (0-0-0)

Students will spend the morning in a commercial kitchen preparing and baking a variety of flatbreads, both yeast raised and unleavened. Flatbreads allow you to add new textures and flavors to your menu. As an added bonus, many of them can be made quickly. Breads will include Middle-Eastern pita, Indian filled naan, French fougasse, Moroccan crisp flatbreads and more. ALL STUDENTS MUST COMEDESSED TO BAKE WITH AN APRON, A HAIR BAND OR HAT TO RESTRAIN THEIR HAIR AND CLOSED TOED SHOES.

CFE383 Classic Croissants/Filled Var (0-0-0)

Students will learn to prepare the classic French laminated pastry dough for croissants. Unlike many commercial examples, these croissants will be made with pure unsalted butter, the many layers of which gives them their flaky texture. From our dough, students will shape and bake plain butter croissants, almond croissants, and pain au chocolate as well as a savory ham and cheese variation. ALL STUDENTS MUST COME DRESSED TO BAKE WITH AN APRON, A HAIR BAND OR HAT TO RESTRAIN THEIR HAIR AND WEAR CLOSED TOED SHOES.

CFE384 Server/Waitstaff Boot Camp (0-0-0)

This class will help participants acquire top level customer service skills & demonstrate their relationship to profts & gratuity; tips to improve suggestive selling; guidelines for establishing long term guest relationships; and ways of increasing guest check averages. An intensive discussion of all these factors and role playing exercises will assist each participant in practicing, becoming comfortable and perfecting all the acquired service skills effectively. Class is open to novice and experienced servers and wait staff.

CFE385 Cream Puffs and Eclairs (0-0-0)

This is a hand-on class that will introduce students to some of the foundation techniques of French pastry making. Students will prepare and bake the classic pate a choux to create cream puffs and eclair shells. We will make a variety of fillings and toppings using different techniques to prepare a nice assortment of pastries for each student to take home. *All students must come dressed to bake with an apron, a hair band or hat to restrain their hair and closed toed shoes.

CFE386 8Hr Sec Grd Pre-Assign Traing (0-0-0)

The 8 hour pre-assignment training certificate is the minimum requirement to work in security in New York State. This training class is developed in accordance with the NYS Security Guard Act and presents an overview of a security guard's duties and responsibilities under the law. the certificate is earned by passing the exam at the end of the class.

CFE387 16 Hour Sec OTJ Training (0-0-0)

NYS Department of Criminal Justice Services requires this 16 hour course. This course provides teh required training and certification to security personnel within the first 90 days of employment.

CFE388 8Hr Sec Guard Ann Refresher (0-0-0)

Security guards are required to complete this 8 hour in-service training course to meet the nYS Department of Criminal Justice Services requirements every year. Participants will receive a certificate of completion at the end of the course.

CFE389 Ballet Dance Instruction (0-0-0)

Whether it's a refresher course for those with some training or your first taste of ballet, come and enjoy learning ballet. Students ages 12 and older are welcome to attend this open level dance class. Students are asked to wear clothing that is easy to move in, to pull their hair off the face and wear ballet slippers.

CFE391 Web Opt for Small Bus on Budg (0-0-0)

Explore free or inexpensive online tools you can use yourself to create a Web presence for your business, including Google Sites and Weebly, low-cost hosting like Intuit.com and GoDaddy.com, e-commerce "stores in a box," and social networking sites. Examine the pros and cons of each tool and choose the ones that are right for your business and customers.

CFE392 Building a Free Website (0-0-0)

If you want a web site but aren't sure where to begin, start with Weebly.com. Weebly offers a free, easy-to-use drag and drop tool for "non-techies". Weebly supplies the page designs and hundreds of free quality photos: you supply the content. In this hands-on course, you will learn how to use Weebly to build your free Web pages.

CFE395 Intr Video Game Design (0-0-0)

Do you love video games? Have you ever wanted to learn how to create fun and entertaining video games? Join two professional game developers from Vicarious Visions to learn all about the game development process. Students ages 13-18 will look at existing games to learn how to balance and design games, understand programming concepts, work in a group or alone to create new games and talk with professional game developers to understand careers in games. Students may bring their own laptops.

CFE396 Intr to Africa-Amer History (0-0-0)

This course will examine the origin of African-American people in continental Africa and trace the Black experience in America to the present. Emphasis will be placed on African roots, transition to slavery, the realities of slavery, opposition to slavery, the civil war, reconstruction and its aftermath, the period of Jim Crowism, Black Nationalism, African-American participation in the world wars, institutional development and the modern civil rights movement.

CFE397 Puff Pastry Dough & Pastries (0-0-0)



CFE398 TIPS:Traing Intervent Procdrs (0-0-0)

TIPS training is a dynamic, skills-based training program designed to prevent intoxication, drunk driving and underage drinking by enhancing the fundamental "people skills" of servers, sellers and consumers of alcohol. TIPS gives individuals the knowledge and confidence they need to recognize potential alcohol-related problems and intervene to prevent alcohol-related tragedies. TIPS training satisfies the requirement in NYS that regulates server training. Also, many insurance companies provide discounts to establishments whose employees are TIPS certified. Materials fee: $20. TIPS booklet to be purchased in the bookstore prior to class.

CFE399 Knife Skills/Basic Cook Tech (0-0-0)

The primary emphasis of this workshop will be on teaching students to safely use a chef's knife. The instructor will demonstrate proper technique for slicing, dicing, chopping and julienne (matchstick cut). Students will practice these skills on a variety of fresh vegetables. The instructor will discuss knife selection and show various methods of sharpening knives. Utilizing the vegetables cut in class, the chef will demonstrate a variety of basic cooking techniques including steaming, blanching, sauteing, braising and roasting. Students are encouraged to email the instructor, Chef Paul Krebs, @krebspv@sunysccc.edu prior to class for suggestions on bringing a suitable knife for class. There will be additional knives available for students to try. *All students must come dressed to bake with an apron, a hair band or hat to restrain their hair and closed toed shoes.

CFE401 Doughnuts and Fritters (0-0-0)

This is a hands-on-class in which students will work in a professional kitchen with an experienced baker and learn how to prepare these popular treats. Students will make fresh apple fritters and both yeast-raised and cake doughnuts.

CFE402 Cert. Specialist of Wine Prep (0-0-0)

This course will prepare the student to take the Society of Wine's Certified Specialist of Wine (CSW) exam, which tests a candidate's wine knowledge and mastery of key elements within the worlds of viticulture and wine production.

CFE524 Basic Emt Training (0-0-0)

This course is designed to meet New York State Health Department (Bureau of Emergency Health Services) requirements for Emergency Medical Technician training. This course is updated yearly to include materials appropriate for EMT training as included in the New York State EMS program CFR/EMT/AEMT student manual. The course will adhere to the SCCC/REMO AMT Sponsor's agreement and all current New York State regulations for EMT training, including requirements for class time and instructor certification. Students should note that some Saturday sessions are required in addition to regularly scheduled class hours. PR: All students must be at least 18 years old.

CFE526 E M T Refresher (0-0-0)

This course is designed to meet New York State Health Department (Bureau of Emergency Health Services) requirements for EMT Refresher. New laws and policies will be discussed, as well as new technology appropriate to the course which has been introduced during the past three years. The course will adhere to the SCCC/REMO AMT Sponsor's Agreement and all current New York State regulations for EMT-B training, including requirements for class time and instructor certification. PR: A student may have a current EMT card that will expire in less than 18 months; a student who was certified as a NYS Emergency Medical Technician may have a lapsed certification; a student who has previously failed the Final Practical Skills Exam within one year or has failed the state written certifying exam after a second attempt may enroll in the refresher course. Proof of failure must be provided to the CIC by the student; a student who has received written permission from the Bureau of EMS to entroll in and EMT-B refresher course as a result of filing for reciprocity based on EMT training from another state. The student must submit the letter which was provided from the Bureau of EMS as proof of eligibility for enrolling in the refresher.

CFE539 Selling Your Home (0-0-0)



CFE561 Italian for Travelers (0-0-0)



CFE562 Little Scientist (0-0-0)



CFE563 Crime Solvers (0-0-0)



CFE564 Earth, Moon and Stars (0-0-0)



CFE565 Discovering Dinosaurs (0-0-0)



CFE566 Notion of Motion (0-0-0)



CFE567 Explainers and Explorers (0-0-0)



CFE568 Bubblology (0-0-0)



CFE569 Digging for Dinosaurs (0-0-0)



CFE570 Jr. Curator (0-0-0)



CFE571 Creepy Crawley Insects (0-0-0)



CFE572 It's a Small, Small Nano World (0-0-0)



CFE573 Jr. Planetarian (0-0-0)



CFE574 Edible Science (0-0-0)



CFE575 Electric Circuits (0-0-0)



CFE576 Sciencetoyific (0-0-0)



CFE577 Kooky Chemistry (0-0-0)



CFE578 Movers and Shakers (0-0-0)



CFE579 Blast Off (0-0-0)



CFE580 Under Our Big Sky (0-0-0)



CFE581 Lego Robotics (0-0-0)



CFE582 Glow World Glow (0-0-0)



CFE583 Out of This World (0-0-0)



CFE584 Astro Kids (0-0-0)

Take a journey into space and learn all about our solar system! Investigate black holes, comets, and constellations. Learn why the planets move, make a star map, and fit a solar system in your pocket.

CFE585 Engineering Mission (0-0-0)

Learn some basic principles of engineering and science. What makes a structure sturdy? Can you design a building to withstand an earthquake? A lunar lander for the moon? Test your building skills as a junior engineer!

CFE600 Creative Writing (3-0-0)

Writing is a joyful experssion, whether you hope to be a professional or not. This course will take us from the basics (grammar, spelling and rules of writing), through concepts such as literacy license and the elusive "finding your voice." Identifying your passion, and writing about it is a key concept - once we do that, finding media that will pay you to write about what you love is easy! Join us for this six-week adventure and become part of the community of people who've found personal and professional fullfillment through this wonderful, heart-ful art.

CFE601 Business Writing (3-0-0)

Many organizations, corporations and other businesses either can't afford or don't want to hire a professional writer to supply the many documents that are necessary during the course of a business day: press releases, newsletters, reports, letters and niche-specific peripherals This leaves the job of communication in the lap of employees. This course will help the student plan and create the necessary documents that are necessary during a normal business day.

CFE603 Guitar Lessons for Adults (0-0-0)

Learn how to play the guitar! This course will include fundamental instruction in reading notes, strumming chords to songs, and technical development. Instruction will consist of 10, half-hour individual lessons. Students of all skill levels are welcome.

CFE808 SAVE (0-0-0)



CFE809 Mand Report of Child Abuse (0-0-0)



CFE901 Power Pt Redesign (0-0-0)

Do you fill your slides with bullets and then read every word of every slide? Do you use special effects and flying bullets to keep your audience awake? These are danger signs of "death by PowerPoint." This course will help students learn how to tell their stories effectively and actively engage their audiences by applying a few simple guidelines for slide design and communication principles. Students should bring a PowerPoint presentation on a flash drive to class in order to work on redesigning the presentation and get feedback/technical assistance on skills such as adding images and charts.

CFE902 HR Legislative Update of NYS (0-0-0)



CFE903 The Butt Stops Here (0-0-0)

"The Butt Stops Here" Quit Smoking Program 7-Session Program, now offered at SCCC! This pilot offereing is free to SCCC Students. Faculty, and Staff. Informational Workshop DAY: Wednesday, January 29, 2014 TIME: 11:30-12:15 PM LOCATION: Activity Forum OFFERED BY: Eric Carlson, Associate Professor and Certified Facilitator Regiser today for this noncredit class before the class fills. For more information, contact Maria Kotary at (518) 381-1315.

CFE970 Becoming Debt Free (0-0-0)



CFE972 Customer Service Excellence (0-0-0)



CFN128 Kripalu Yoga (0-0-0)

This class offers a slower-paced practice in a relaxed, non-competitive setting. Students will learn correct alignment of each posture as well as breathing, meditation and relaxation techniques. This practice will create balance in the body by developing strength and flexibility, enhancing mental focus, reducing stress and improving overall physical and mental health. This gentle yoga class is accessible to people of all sizes, ages and fitness levels. PLEASE BRING A YOGA MAT, WATER AND A SMALL TOWEL TO CLASS.

CFN155 Get Yourself Published (0-0-0)

OK, so you're a writer, but a writer without readers is sileneced. During this course, we'll help you identify the print and electronic media through which your words will find your audience. Whether you aspire to write for magazines, books, blogs or other Web-based columns - your desires can be fulfilled, with a little work and a lot of encouragement from instructor, and authork, Mario E. Alteiri, and from classmates who want to help you succeed. By the end of the course, you'll know which media are most attractive to you and how to get yourself placed.

CFN163 Clowning for Adults (0-0-0)

Do you need a stress-relieving hobby? Do you have a hidden funnybone? Express your hidden talents, have fun, and learn a viable trade all at once! You'll learn that clowning is much more than putting on makeup and a costume.

CFN212 Historical Archeology and Field Study (0-0-0)

This course is designed to introduce participants to the field of historical archeology and to explore methods employed for the study of people of the past. Students will investigate local and regional lifeways of peoples of European origin who resided in the Northeast from the 17th century to the mid-19th century. Lectures, readings discussions, hands-on activities are among the teaching methods employed. *Materials fee: two text books totaling $50 are required. Field date to be scheduled separately.

CFN216 Researching and Interpreting Documents in Archeology (0-0-0)

This course examines primary and secondary documents used in archeology. Sources, methods, locations, and interpretations of a variety of documents used for research, proposals, and publications in archaeology are addressed. Visits to repositories, discussions, lectures, and hands-on activities are among the methods employed.

CFN217 Record & Archiv Archeo Data (0-0-0)

This course addresses why detailed records are maintained during excavation and how the artifacts and records are processed into permanent archives that form the basis for future research. Hands-on activities include artifact illustration and description, photographic recording, computer database analysis, data retrieval and final data archiving. The course is supplemented with visits to museums an archival repositories. *Field date will be scheduled separately.

CFN218 Archaeol Lab Prac and Site Stu (0-0-0)

This course gives participants an opportunity to enhance their laboratory skills by learning to further analyze artifacts and materials for identification, processing and conservation. Artifacts from selected archaeological sites will be used; with a concentration on the manufacturing, processing and conservation methodolgies for a variety of organic and inorganic objects. Sessions include lectures, visual media, domeonstrations and hands-on activities. PRE-REQUISITE: CFN-212 HISTORICAL ARCHAEOLOGY & FIELD STUDY OR CFN-413 NATIVE AMERICAN ARCHAEOLOGY & FIELD STUDY.

CFN219 Archaeological Field Work Program (0-0-0)

This course gives participants an opportunity to learn and/or enhance specific archaeological fieldwork skills. It is designed to train the participants in applying the basic principles of surveying to a site area by using a transit and other techniques for surface mapping. The participant will also receive formal training in excavating and recording archaeological data. Field sessions will take place primarily at the Mabee Farm, a historic property owned and operated by the Schneectad County Historical Society. PR: CFN 212 or CFN 413

CFN223 Intro to Rock Climbing (0-0-0)

This beginner's courseis designed to take a participant from having absolutely no experience with indoor/outdoor rock climbing to feeling confident climbing in any rock climbing gym or outdoor rock climbing area. The participants will learn about basic rock climbing techniques, body movement, stretching and strength workouts, safety considerations, belaying, climbing ethics, climbing vocabulary, description of equipment, knot work, and rope management. Students must not have pre-existing physical problems that would hinder them during physical exercise and/or strenuous physical exertion (i.e. heart condition, joint injury, severe asthma).

CFN224 Intermed Rock Climbing (0-0-0)



CFN233 Drivers' Education (0-0-0)

The NYS Drivers' Education Program provides 24 hours of classroom time, 6 hours of actual driving experience and 18 hours of in-car observation. Students must be at least 16 years of age and must have a valid NYS Learners' permit or a NYS Driver's License. Students must attend all scheduled classes in order to successfully complete the course and be eligible to receive the MV285 certificate (the Blue Card). Students who complete this course will eligible for the "Class D" driver's license when they are 17. DRIVING TIMES WILL BE SCHEDULED INDIVIDUALLY WITH THE STUDENT ON SATURDAYS.

CFN234 Basic Land Navigation (0-0-0)

This introductory land navigation course is directed toward outdoor-minded people such as campers, hikers, hunters, adventurists, or anyone who travels into mother nature and would like to feel confident enough to tackle the wilderness without fear of getting lost. Topics include reading, understanding, and using maps for land navigation; understanding, using, and becoming proficient using a compass; learning how to use a map and a compass together; and using the map and compass together for basic orienteering and land navigation. Outdoor demonstrations will be included.

CFN238 Power Yoga (0-0-0)

This class takes the traditional yoga series & incorporates a more eclectic, dynamic and powerful flow that detoxifies, heals and rejuvenates the body. Students will use breath, strength and flexibility to move through a series of more advanced postures as well as hold poses for longer periods of time. Centering, meditation and relaxation are also an integral part of this experience. Please bring a yoga mat, water and a small towel to class.

CFN239 Hands On Archeology (0-0-0)

Archaeology is more than digging. Students in this course will explore all aspects of archaeology: planning, excavation, analysis, interpretation and reporting of results through class presentations and hands on activities under the supervision of SCCC's Community Archaeology Program instructor(s). Activities include document study, field survey, digging techniques, artifact identification and other lab analyses. Course options will include fieldtrips and research at local sites within the Stockade and teh Capital District. Opportunities for continued involvement in any or all aspects of archaeology will be presented. .

CFN242 Writ/Illustr Children's Books (0-0-0)



CFN244 Make Money:Online Surveys (0-0-0)

Learn how to make extra cash from home on your computer by giving your opinion on various topics. The instructor will acquaint you with 4 on-line survey companies and help you register for on-line survey assignments. Students must be computer/Internet literate and have a valid e-mail address.

CFN245 Young Golfers' Camp (0-0-0)

Young golfers (ages 9-12 years) will learn age appropriate instruction on the golf swing, short game, rules and golf procedures. Fun contests and prizes are included. Young golfers should bring sneakers and water or sports drink. Golf clubs will be provided for students who do not have their own. This course is taught at the Colonie Town Golf Course located at 418 Consaul Road.

CFN246 Meat Fabrication (0-0-0)

In a day where most of our meats come from a pre-wrapped package or commerically in a large cardboard box, many of us have forgotten where our meat comes from. Join Chef Tanner and learn to break down a full side of pork. Students will also cook a variety of dishes from those primal cuts. This class is intended for both progressional chefs and the advanced amateur cook.

CFN247 Wine Tast:French Wines/Cheese (0-0-0)

Come spend an evening learning about the various wine regions and cheeses of France. Students will taste a variety of wines and cheeses from France.

CFN248 Jr Golf Camp (0-0-0)

Junior golfers (ages 13-16 years) will be given a basic introduction to the sport of Golf. Sessions will cover the basic fundamentals of the golf swing, short game, rules, practice drills, and "on the course" etiquette training. Junior golfers should bring sneakers and water or sports drink. Golf clubs will be provided for students who do not have their own. This course is taught at the Colonie Town Golf Course located at 418 Consaul Road.

CFN249 Golf Camp for Adults (0-0-0)



CFN250 Introductory Notary Public Workshop (0-0-0)

This course prepares individuals for the NYS test and provides a comprehensive view of the notary public office. Confusing laws, concepts, and procedures are clarified in plain English. Ongoing question and answer support provided by the instructor following completion of the course. A Guide to NY Law (5th ed.), $24.95 plus tax, is available from the instructor during class. Must be 18 years or older and live or have a place of business in New York State.

CFN252 Env Sci Camp for Kids (0-0-0)

Students will have the opportunity to learn about the unique habitat around them. Kids (ages 8-12) will learn about nature, conservation, biology, animals and more. This course is taught at the Capital Region Maritime Center in Alplaus.

CFN254 Creative Writing for Teens (0-0-0)

You're a teenager, and you have a way with words. You spend a big chunk of every day txting, writing on FB - and you tweet. But when you put down your smartphone, the world of writing is different. No txting abbreviations in the house - but by the end of the week of Writing Camp for Teens, you'll have a better handle on what your teachers - and colleges - expect from you as a writer and thinker. You don't have to give up creativity in order to write well - in fact, you'll discover that the world of correct written expression is more fun than you thought!

CFN271 Ballroom/Social Dancing (0-0-0)

Tired of watching other people look wonderful on the dance floor? Take action and learn to dance! This course will include dances such as the Cha-cha, the Fox Trot, Swing, the Waltz, Salsa, Bachata, and more. Students are asked not to wear sneakers or rubber sole shoes.

CFN272 Latin and Swing Dancing (0-0-0)

Learn dances such as the salsa, merengue, and more. Suudents are asjed not to wear sneakers or rubber-soled shoes.

CFN273 Ballroom Cardio (0-0-0)



CFN308 MOUS - Powerpoint-Expert (0-0-2)

Many colleges and universities require students to prove their oral proficiency through frequent presentations. Many companies require their employees to present information in group settings. This course is designed to introduce students to Microsoft Power Point, the presentation graphics program. Power Point gives you everything you need to produce a professional-looking presentation. You can print slides, print handouts, print notes pages, prepare for 35 mm slides, or deliver an on-screen presentation.

CFN315 Intermediate Excel 2000 (0-0-0)

If your familiar with Excel and are ready to build upon that knowldge, then this is the course for you. This course will focus on pivot tables, using formulas for (but not limited to) financial, lookup and reference, and math and trig. Students will also learn about conditional formatting, how to protect your spreadsheet from changes and how to create macros for reparative work. Advance charting and forms for easy data entry will also be covered.

CFN333 Introduction to Digital Photography (0-0-2)

This course will explain camera settings and terminology. Students will take digital pictures with different settings on the camera and learn how to download them onto the computer. Students will also become familiar with editing the pictures by brightening, sharpening, color correcting, resizing and removing dust and scratches. Digital cameras are required. Students are required to bring a flash drive to class. - - -

CFN334 Introduction to Scrapbooking (0-0-0)

Are your photos stuffed in shoeboxes? Are they hidden in a closet, basement, or attic? This course will teach you the basics of scrapbooking. Learn how to preserve your treasured photos and memories using photo-safe products to last for generations. Learn organizational tips and time-saving techniques in this hands-on course. Discover which of the three styles of scrapbooking suits you. Bring 8-10 photos. Materials fee: $35

CFN354 Art for Children (0-0-0)



CFN369 Intr to Theater for Kids (0-0-0)

Students (ages 5-8) will be introduced to the theater. Concentration will be on basic techniques of acting, stage presence, and understanding the theater. The session will end with a performance of a play presented by the class.

CFN377 Conv Sign Lang for Children (0-0-0)

This course is designed for children ages 5 and older who are interested in learning another language. No experience is required in this fun and exciting class. Students will learn the manual alphabet as well as signs in various categories including: family, numbers, colors, animals, days of the week, and more. By the end of the class, students will be able to carry on basic conversation in Sign Language. A certificate of completion will be given to each student. Please bring a binder, pen, pencil, and the book, Signing For Kids.

CFN379 Conv Sign Lang for Teens (0-0-0)



CFN390 CPR (0-0-0)



CFN413 Native Amer Archaelgy/Field St (0-0-0)

In this hand-on course, students will explore, through research, interpretation, artifact investigation and field activities as well as current ideas about Native American lifeways prior to European settlement in North America, with emphasis on the greater Northeast. TEXT/MATERIALS FEE: Approximately $30

CFN419 Hands on Archeol for Kids (0-0-0)

How do archaeologists know what life was like for Native Americans in NY State when caribou and mastodons roamed the land? Did you know there was a Dutch settlement in Schenectady's Stockade area during the 1600's? Students (ages 9-13 years) will discover how archaeologists explore these and other questions about people and their lives through fun, above ground activities that will include using survey equipment; deciphering (or decoding) historic maps and colonial handwriting on documents; identifying mystery objects; learning about how sites are found, excavated and dated; and playing colonial games. STUDENTS ARE ASKED TO BRING A LUNCH AND A WATER BOTTLE.

CFN425 Art Exploration (ages 9-11) (0-0-0)

Do you love art and like to try a lot of different projects? This smorgasbord of art activities gives you the opportunity to sample a wide variety of materials, techniques and art forms. Each week you will get to try something new!

CFN430 Art Exploration for Teens (ages 12-15) (0-0-0)

Do you love art and like to try a lot of different projects? This smorgasbord of art activities gives you the opportunity to sample a wide variety of materials, techniques and art forms. Each week you will get to try something new!

CFN444 Beginning Bead Stringing (0-0-0)

This course will teach you how to string beads the professional way. Take all the broken strands you have and re-do them into new and exciting designs. Students will also learn how to make knots, continuous strands, multi strands, and more. Materials fee of $28 will include a strand of pearls, semiprecious beads and other necessary tools.

CFN445 Advanced Bead Stringing (0-0-0)

Bead Stringing. Students will learn how to make earrings to match your beaded strands and how to create jewelry designs. Materials fee: $15.

CFN446 Found Obj...Junk to Jewels (0-0-0)



CFN447 Jewelry Making without Torches (0-0-0)



CFN455 Watercolors (0-0-0)

Everyone will enjoy this hands-on opportunity to explore and experiment with watercolors, as they learn easy, professional painting techniques. You'll be taught how to mix colors and how to apply your paint to watercolor paper. Each class will begin with a live demonstration, followed by a work session and technique exercises, with individual assistance from the instructor. You can expect to finish several paintings during this course. No previous experience in art or drawing is necessary.

CFN461 Watercolors II (0-0-0)

A continuum in wash of still life and photo landscape, and advanced study in color.

CFN466 Figure Drawing (0-0-0)

In figure drawing, an understanding of the human body is developed in all aspects - what the human body is, what it is made of, how it moves, and how it exists in space. The model's poses are simple, becoming more complex as skill and understanding develop. The emphasis then shifts to the entire space of the page, the model within that space, and the relationship of one's figure to another. NOTE: Students under 18 years of age will be required to have parental permission.

CFN467 Beginning Drawing (0-0-0)



CFN472 Let's Talk About the Craft Business (0-0-0)

This class is for artists and craftspeople who would like to get the skills, knowledge, and resources needed to market and open their own business. This course will provide information on establishing credibility, developing portfolios, taking slides, printed material, artist's statements, and displays for stores as well as shows. Students will also learn about direct selling, setting up a bookkeeping system, and advertising in the Capital Region.

CFN473 BEad Stringing for the Holidays (0-0-0)

Learn how to make jewelry as gifts for the holidays or with a holiday twist. This course will teach you how to string beads the professional way. Take all the broken strands you have and re-do them into new and exciting designs. Students will also learn how to make knots, continuous strands, multi strands, and more. Materials fee of $28 will cover a strand of pearls, semi-precious beads and other necessary tools.

CFN478 Serv Safe Certification (0-0-0)



CFN479 Caring for Your Collection (0-0-0)



CFN480 Nature Photography (0-0-0)

This course is for the student ready to take their photography to a new level. Work with local photographer, Claudia Gregoire, and learn to see the world from a new perspective. Two outings will provide an opportunity to take photographs you will then edit and manipulate in the classroom. *DIGITAL CAMERAS ARE REQUIRED.

CFN481 Fast Stone (0-0-0)



CFN482 Drawing Landscapes (0-0-0)



CFN483 KidzArt- Cirque Des Art (0-0-0)



CFN484 KidzArt- Jungle Safari (0-0-0)



CFN485 KidzArt: Cirque & Safari (0-0-0)



CFN486 Camp Paleo (0-0-0)



CFN487 Camp CSI (0-0-0)



CFN488 Little Robot Inventor (0-0-0)



CFN489 Robot Inventor (0-0-0)



CFN490 Camp Deep Space (0-0-0)



CFN491 Camp Space Engineer (0-0-0)



CFN492 Driver's Ed Additional Driving (0-0-0)



CFN501 Fly Fishing (0-0-0)



CFN502 Beginning Fly Tying (0-0-0)

If you're having trouble learning how to fly fish, this course, given in collaboration with the Clearwater Chapter of Trout Unlimited, will give you the tools you need to get started. Students will meet at the Capital Region Maritime Center in Alplaus to learn the basics of fly tying. Topics will include fly tying tools, materials used, wet flies, dry flies, thread handling and hooks, as well as other useful fly fishing topics. Students need to bring their own tools which consist of a vise, hackle pliers, scissors, bobbin, and head cement. Materials will be provided.

CFN503 Advanced Fly Tying (0-0-0)



CFN597 Beginning Piano for Children (0-0-0)

This course, designed especially for the beginner, ages 6-17, will include fundamental instruction in note reading, rhythm recognition, proper hand position, and chords. Instruction will consist of 10, half-hour individual lessons.

CFN599 Theater Workshop for Children (0-0-0)

Concentration will be on basic techniques of acting, stage presence, proper singing techniques and vocal independence, and understanding of the theater. The session will end with a performance of a musical play presented by the class. Students must be between 9 and 14 years of age.

CFN600 Group Piano For Adults I (0-0-0)

Always wanted to learn to play the piano? This course, designed especially for the adult beginner, will include fundamental instruction in note reading, rhythm recognition, proper hand position, chords, and learning to play in both beginning and classical styles, as well as pop.

CFN605 Private Lessons - 30 minutes (0-0-0)

This course is designed especially for the beginner, and will include fundamental instruction in note reading, rhythm recognition, proper hand position, and chords. Instruction will consist of 10 half-hour individual lessons.

CFN610 Archaeological Field Conservation (0-0-0)

When artifacts are excavated, these objects are immediately exposed to various levels of deterioration. This course will focus on methods for proper extraction of cultural materials in the field and how to prepare the materials for transport to a laboratory. A variety of methods for stabilization and consolodation in the field will be demonstrated.

CFN612 Intermd Piano for Children (0-0-0)



CFN613 CSI Schenectady (0-0-0)

Students between the ages of 13 and 16 will learn about the full range of law enforcement activities from the time a crime is committed through the time the case is closed. Class topics include crime scene investigation, forensics, arrest and arraignment, the trial, due process, corrections, and parole. Student will meet and work along side the real officers and officials who work in the criminal justice system during expert presentations and demonstrations. A field trip to the Schenectady County jail is planned. Students are asked to bring a bagged lunch.

CFN619 Voice for Children (0-0-0)

Students will learn proper singing technique and vocal independence through solo work. Students should be 6-17 years of age. Instruction will consist of 10, half-hour individual lessons.

CFN625 Group Piano for Adults II (0-0-0)

This course continues Group Piano I, serving those who are already proficient in beginning piano and have a basic knowledge of music reading and keyboard technique.

CFN626 Voice for Adults (age 13+) (0-0-0)

A class for adults who love to sing but have little or no formal training. Learn the fundamentals of singing through solo and choral literature and learn to read musical notation. Focus on improving your vocal sound.

CFN634 How to Maintain Peak Computer Performance (0-0-0)

Learn how to perform the procedures that will free up hard disk space and how to optimize your hard drive for faster performance. These techniques apply to all versions of Windows.

CFN645 Daytime Series - Intro to PowerPoint (0-0-0)

into Content Wizard, Design Template, and Blank Presentation. Work with a blank presentation and create a slide show with sound effects, timing and transition.

CFN652 Welcome to E-Bay (0-0-0)

eBay is the world's largest trading community where people buy and sell a variety of different itmes every day. This course will teach you how to manipulate and use eBay.

CFN653 Intermediate Digital Photography (0-0-0)

This class will teach you how to edit your pictures with Microsoft Picture It, making them your own personal works of art. Go one step further and share them with friends and family in personalized greeting cards that you create from scratch.

CFN678 More Writ/Illustr Child's Book (0-0-0)



CFN679 Wilton Cake Decorating 1 (0-0-0)

This course is an introduction to basic cake frosting and decorating. Topics covered will include techniques for cake and cupcake frosting and decorating, character cake creation, and tiered cakes as well as the use of fondant and gumpaste to decorate cakes and create flowers. In addition, the course will discuss general tips on cake design and creativity from baking through a finished product that is sure to impress. ADDITIONAL COURSE MATERIALS WILL COST ABOUT $100.

CFN680 Wilton Cake Decorating 2 (0-0-0)

Learn a variety of techniques such as royal icing flowers, colorflow, rope border, and basket weave. Materials fee: $30. Students will also be required to purchase additional materials for approximately $40 throughout the course. PR: Wilton Cake Decorating 1

CFN682 Using a Palm Pilot (0-0-0)

You got a Palm Pilot, and now you want to learn how to use its features. This stress-free class gives you the opportunity to explore its numerous offerings. Bring your Palm Pilot with you to class and discover all that you can do with it.

CFN684 Wilton Cake Decor 3 (0-0-0)

Learn how to use rolled fondant to make tiered wedding cakes, roses, and how to present the cake. Students will also learn how to make stringwork, garland, lily nail flowers, and lace. The final cake will be a fondant-covered two-tier cake. Materials fee: $30. Students will be required to purchase additional materials for approximately $60 throughout the course. PR: Wilton Cake Decorating 2

CFN685 Grp Voice for Kids (0-0-0)



CFN686 Women's Martial Arts Defense (0-0-0)



CFN687 Underwater Shipwreck Arch (0-0-0)



CFN696 Working with Queries/Access (0-0-0)



CFN699 Enhance Slideshows Music (0-0-0)



CFN700 Edit Photos in PhotoShop (0-0-0)



CFN701 Present Arch Findings (0-0-0)



CFN702 Geoarcheology (0-0-0)



CFN713 Acting for Adults (0-0-0)

xThis theatre course emphasizes basic acting skills and how them can help in many life situations, as well as in performances and public speaking. Through exploring,acting vocally, physically, and mentally, students will work to improve their creativiity and flexibility as actors. Course content will address stage fright, vocal and physical control onstage, and various ways to approach and act out dramatic roles. Students will be using theatre games, monologues, scene work and original work as our tools for self expression, as well as improvisations around a specific set of circumstances and role reversal.

CFN715 Cert of Employability (0-0-0)



CFN727 ID/Ecol NE Plants/Animals (0-0-0)



CFN728 MS Photo Story (0-0-0)



CFN729 AutoTasks:MSWord/Excel (0-0-0)



CFN730 Web-Shots Photo Albums (0-0-0)



CFN731 Precious Metal Clay (0-0-0)



CFN732 Jewelry Making (0-0-0)



CFN737 Archeol Research (0-0-0)

This course is mandatory for students of the Community Archaeology Program who wish to volunteer at different archaeological sites in Schenectady County. Students will conduct research activities in the field and in laboratory settings. Students will participate in structured/supervised research, lab and field experiences.

CFN738 Archeol of Erie Canal (0-0-0)



CFN739 Indep Archaeol Prod (0-0-0)



CFN740 Arch of Architecture (0-0-0)

Students will be introduced to the field techniques, tools and technologies used to record, interpret and identify architectural resources encountered as either standing structures or in archaeological contexts. Approximately 50% of the class will be spent in field trips, arranged for Saturday mornings. This course is taught by Walter Wheeler, an Architectural Historian with Hartgen Archaeological Associates, Inc.

CFN741 Let's Make Earrings (0-0-0)



CFN742 Let's Make Clasps (0-0-0)



CFN743 Bead Crocheting (0-0-0)



CFN744 Beg 1 Stroke:Painting (0-0-0)



CFN745 Inter 1 Stroke:Painting (0-0-0)



CFN746 Adv 1 Stroke:Painting (0-0-0)



CFN750 Taste of Jewelry Making (0-0-0)



CFN753 Scenic Art Stage Lighting (0-0-0)



CFN754 Basic Welding (0-0-0)



CFN755 Library Asst/Tech Training (0-0-0)



CFN756 SCCC Summer Concert Band (0-0-0)



CFN757 Trade,Colonial,19th C Pottery (0-0-0)



CFN758 Callig & Illumin Manuscripts (0-0-0)



CFN759 Col Pencil & Drawing (0-0-0)



CFN760 How to Make Settings (0-0-0)



CFN761 Fondant and Gumpaste Tech (0-0-0)

(9 hours) CFN 761 Discover a great new way to add excitement to your cakes using these easy to shape icings. In this course you will experience a variety of fondant techniques and the beauty of gum paste. You will create flowers and accents with beautiful detail. Basic figure sculpting and painting with various luster dusts and powders will add a new dimension to your cakes. You will see how to use the tools that professionals use to create those edible masterpieces. Each new technique will prepare you to decorate a cake that will look stunning for your Easter or Spring celebrations.

CFN762 Make Jewelry:Spir Rope Stitch (0-0-0)



CFN763 Make Jewelry:Peyote Stitch (0-0-0)



CFN764 What's New Word 2007 (0-0-0)



CFN765 What's New Excel 2007 (0-0-0)



CFN766 Learn Social Netwking Sites (0-0-0)



CFN767 Create Yr Web Presence (0-0-0)



CFN768 Arch/Hist: Local Iron Industry (0-0-0)



CFN769 Make Gingerbread House (0-0-0)



CFN770 Paper Art for Kids (0-0-0)



CFN771 Scrapbk Essentials Paper Art (0-0-0)



CFN772 Youth Sports Institute (0-0-0)



CFN773 Camp Millionaire (0-0-0)



CFN774 Period Homes: Inter/Furnishing (0-0-0)



CFN775 Welcome to I-Tunes (0-0-0)



CFN776 Wine Tasting (0-0-0)



CFN777 Intermed Voice for Children (0-0-0)



CFN778 Cupcake Decorating (0-0-0)



CFN779 Aikido for Children (0-0-0)



CFN780 Aikido for Adults (4 weeks) (0-0-0)



CFN781 Mod Charcuter Adv Amateur&Chef (0-0-0)



CFN782 Fundam Taste and Flavor (0-0-0)



CFN783 ACF Certification (0-0-0)



CFN784 Aikado for Kids (0-0-0)

Students (ages 10-13 years of age) will practice the Hombu style of Aikido, which strenthens the body, mind and spirit. Aikido uses blending and redirecting techniques, Jujutsu joint locks and box elements that keep this martial art applicable for all individuals. Aikido promotes self defense, flexibility, strength building and coordination.

CFN785 Aikido for Adults (0-0-0)

Students (ages 14 years of age and older) will parctice the Hombu style of Aikido, which strenthens the body, mind, and spirit. Aikido uses blending and redirecting techniques, Jujutsu joint locks and boxing elements that keep this martial art applicable for all individuals. Aikido promotes self-defense, flexibility, strength building and coordination.

CFN786 Belly Dancing (0-0-0)



CFN787 Intr West Horseback Riding (0-0-0)



CFN788 Intr West Trail Horsebk Riding (0-0-0)



CFN789 New in Office 2007 (0-0-0)



CFN790 Control Your PC Files (0-0-0)



CFN791 Gentle Yoga (0-0-0)



CFN792 Computer Survival IV (0-0-0)

Continue to build on the skills you've learned in the Computer Survival classes. Students will explore options to get answer to those questiosn that always pop up and classes will include a question/answer period. Topics will include free software and how to obtain viewers for those documents you can't view. Students will learn how to back up files and address books, visit YouTube and create a slide show to share with others. Students are required to bring a flash drive to class. Pre-requisite: CFN 676

CFN793 Free Software A-Z (0-0-0)

This class pays for itself! Join the millions of people who already know that you don't have to have to pay big bucks to get feature-rich word processors, spreadsheets, presentation tools, photo editors, audio recorders, computer security applicatons and other softward you need for your small business or home use. Discover popular, highly rated free alternatives to big name products as well as free cool tools for home design, sharable family/business/club schedulers, and PDF makers. You will also learn how learn how to find other free, well-tested software on your own.

CFN794 Intro Office Suite (0-0-0)



CFN795 Geneology In Hist Archeology (0-0-0)



CFN796 First Dance:Wedding Wkshp (0-0-0)



CFN797 Enneagram-Understand Ourselves (0-0-0)



CFN798 Redefining Success Wksh (0-0-0)



CFN799 Create:Coffee Tab Book (0-0-0)

Create a book full of memories documenting family, friends or special vacations. Bring your favorite photos to class on a CD or flash drive, organize and edit them for your photo book. Students will work in Winkflash, set up your account and get your book ready to print.

CFN800 Creative Projects (0-0-0)



CFN801 Improv Basics (0-0-0)



CFN802 Zumba (0-0-0)

Let loose and feel the music! Zumba Fitness is a Latin-inspired, easy-to-follow, calorie-burning, dance fitness party that will get you in shape before you know it!. No experience is necessary. STUDENTS ARE ASKED TO PLEASE WEAR SNEAKERS AND BRING A WATER BOTTLE.

CFN803 Schen Cul Boot Camp (0-0-0)



CFN804 Basic Culinary Voc Training (0-0-0)



CFN805 Basic Med Vocational Training (0-0-0)



CFN806 Basics of Motorcycle Mainten (0-0-0)



CFN807 Intr Basic Cake Decorating (0-0-0)



CFN808 Children's Char Cake Decorat (0-0-0)



CFN809 Intro to Auto CAD (0-0-0)



CFN810 Notary Public Review (0-0-0)

This course will prepare the student for the New York State Notary Public test and provide a comprehensive view of the Notary Public office. Confusing laws, concepts and procedures will be clearly explained and examples will be provided to discuss situations that a Notary Public officer is likely to encounter. Topics include avoiding conflicts of interest, maintaining professional ethics, charging proper fees, handling special situations, deferring to an attorney and minimizing legal liability. All materials will be provided.

CFN811 Industrial Archeology (0-0-0)

Learn all the basics of Industrial Archaeology included quarries, mines, mills, factories, highways, railroads and canals. Discover pieces of history in your own backyard by using landscape archaeology techniques combind with historical documents such as photographs and newspaper articles. Two field trips in the Capital District will be included during class time. Additional reading and projects are encouraged.

CFN812 Basket Weaving (0-0-0)



CFN813 Intr:Graphic Design Techniques (0-0-0)

of visual communication through the use of type, image, form and color. Students learn fundamentals of typography, design, layout and digital skills. The course includes basic design and type exercises reinforced in the digital portion of the class using Adobe PhotoShop software. An introduction to design skills needed to produce graphics for print, advertising, corporate identity and other media will be covered. Basic PC knowledge required. Students are required to bring a flash drive to class (at least 2 GB).

CFN814 Intro to Voice Overs (0-0-0)

This fun, informative and empowering class will teach you the basics of the voice over industry. Students will discuss the many different types of voice overs and what it takes to get started as a voice over actor. Students will be recorded as they read from real scripts and receive a professional voice evaluation.

CFN815 Basic Electricity Course (0-0-0)

This is an introduction to basic electricty, a course that will give you the knowledge you need to take the next step to advanced training for almost any profession that deals with electricity. Our Basic Electricity course provides a introduction to industrial electricity principles as applied to modern industrial, commerical and institutional electric power systems. This course will provide you with a solid foundation on which you can build. Whether you intend on continuing your education or apprenticing in any afore- mentioned trades you will start with a firm footing beneath you. The fundamentals include Electrical Flow, Ohm's Law, Electrical Drawings, Symbols and Schematics, Basic Relay, Breaker and Fuse operation, as well as AC transformers and Electric Motors. Participants will assemble practical circuits in which they will apply the concepts learned. *Students are required to bring the book, Residential Wiring 15th edition by Ray C. Mullin to class. This course is taught at the Capital Region BOCES.

CFN816 Adv Electricity (0-0-0)

This course is designed for the home or business owners interested in installing a Renewable Energy system to either save on their utility bills, lower their carbon foot or hedge themselves against rising energy costs. The course will detail all of the different types of renewable energy (RE) resources available in upstate New York. Several of the RE types to be discussed will be solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, wind, geothermal and biomass. By the end of the course, the student will understand how each system works, their pros and cons, be able to access the viability for RE at his/her property and understand how all the state incentives and tax credits help pay for these systems.

CFN817 Solar PV for Contractors (0-0-0)

This course will instruct roofers, homebuilders, electricians and landscape designers how to integrate solar into jobs and elevate your services above the competitors. Students will be able to win more projects and earn additional income. The course will also discuss the different types of solar and their installation procedures, how to assess yoru customers viability for solar and solar selling techniques. By the end of the course, the student willbe able to confidently introduce solar to potential customers and develop an additional service to their business.

CFN818 Basket Weaving for Kids (0-0-0)



CFN819 Writing & Illustrat Advtr Stor (0-0-0)



CFN820 Writing & Illustrat Myst Story (0-0-0)



CFN821 Solar,Wind,Renewables (0-0-0)

This course is designed for the home or business owner interested in installing a Renewable Energy system to either save on their utility bills, lower their carbon footprint or hedge themselves against rising energy costs. The course willdetail all of the different types of renewable energy (RE) resources available in upstate New York. Several of the RE types to be discussed will be solar photovoltaic, solar thermal, wind, geothermal and biomass. By the end of the course the student will understand how each system works, their pros and cons, be able to access the viability for RE at your property and understnad how all the state incentives and tax credits help pay for these systems.

CFN822 Budg and Fin Plan Sml Bus (0-0-0)

Have you ever wondered where your money goes? How can you control your cash? Small businesses often fail due to lack of financial planning and cash. Small business owners need to harness their resources through financial planning. Budgets are the foundation of every financial plan, whether you need a loan or just to see how you are doing now and 12 months down the line. The course will highlight different ways to formulate budgets, focus on cash flow and cash projections as well as overall forecasting and strategic plans.

CFN823 Geneology 2:Doc Archeology (0-0-0)

This advanced genealogy course will guild on the basic genealogy skills learned in "Genealogy and Historic Archaeology." Students will continue to discuss record- keeping practice and archival rules, a variety of repositories in the area and the sources they offer. A field trip to the New York State Library and Archives is planned. Research will be oriented toward family histories. *Students will need to bring the software "Family Tree Maker," approximately $50, to class or subscribe to ancestry.com.

CFN824 Medieval Archeology (0-0-0)



CFN825 Geneology II:Doc Arch (0-0-0)



CFN826 Culture of Death: Cemeteries (0-0-0)

The course will examine cemetaries and gravestones from a variety of perspectives. Standing above the surface, cemetaries contain a large component of material culture left by past people for future generations. They reflect changing outlooks on death and can tell us not only about who is buried, but also about those people who buried them. By looking at cemetary layouts and locations as well as stone types, monument size, epitaphs and carved art, this class will analyze and interpret cemetaries and gravestones to learn more about the past. A field trip will be scheduled.

CFN827 Sign Lang for Par and Educator (0-0-0)



CFN900 Nanotechnology Research (0-0-0)



CFN901 Zumbatomic for Kids (0-0-0)

This course is designed exclusively for kids ages 4-6 years of age. It is a high energy fitness party packed with specifically choreographed, kid-friendly routines and all the music kids love. This course will help increse their focus and self-confidence, boosting metabolism and enhancing coordination. This course will be taught at the YWCA of Schenectady. Parents of students enrolled in this course will be able to utilize the YWCA's Fitness Center while the child is in class. Students are asked to wear sneakers and fitness attire as well as bring a water bottle to class.

CFN902 Reel to Reel: Arch in Hollywd (0-0-0)

Hollywood and in documentaries. Topics include mummies, pirates, Native Americans, the Titanic, sunken warships and certain box office films.

CFN903 Basic Photovolt Systems (0-0-0)



CFN905 Turbo Kick (0-0-0)

This class is a combination of kickboxing moves, as well as dance moves, all perfectly choreographed to high energy and motivating music. It's a unique blend of interval strength and endurance training. Come prepared to move and break a sweat! Students are asked to come dressed in fitness attire and bring a water bottle.

CFN906 Pilates Mat Class (0-0-0)

Pilates is a mind-body core exercise class that will work to improve alignment and breathing, and is balanced with grace- ful movement. This course's focus will be on conditioning the body from the inside out. Students are asked to bring a sticky mat, come dressed in fitness attire and bring a water bottle.

CFN907 Can You Dig It? (0-0-0)

Archaeology and Paleontology seem like big words to kids but Sciensational Workshops for Kids makes them come alive. Each child will partake in a simulated fossill excavation, uncovering the different bones of a dinosaur. Each child (ages 6-11) will partake in a simulated fossil excavation, uncovering the different bones of a dinosaur. Each child then assemble the bones to form a completed 3D dinosaur to be taken home. Students will learn to use geological time and fossil charts; make a plaster fossil replica of an ammonite, Tyrannasaurus Rex tooth or choose from other available molds; and get a chance to identify a 20 million year old shark's tooth. Students will also see other fossil replicas, work with a rock and mineral collection and see and hold a giant pumice rock specimen from Mt. Helen's.

CFN908 Hyper Peppy Robotics (0-0-0)

Students (ages 7-12) will build and take home their very own Hyper Peppy Robot. It is sound activated and the clap of your hands will get it moving. The robot has a very sensitive touch/sound sensor and it's fast! Students will be happy to adjust its sensitivity and see first hand the robot's many gears, circuit boeard, microphone and easy to asemble mechanical drive system. Students will also get to build other robots as part of a small group. Be a part of robotic technology and have fun investigating the future effects it will have on our lives.

CFN909 Make It, Take It Home (0-0-0)

In this hands-on, fun and exciting program, students (ages 6-11) will discover the amazing world of science. Students will make and take home a wide assortment of of toys designed to teach science concepts in a hands-on way. Students will grow and and take home a crystal tree, make an energy bread bracelet and watch the beads turn from white to a rainbow of colors, build a working electric motor and much more. Students will also make their own sharpie pen t-shirt and learn some cool chemistry. Studens will make their own bubling blobs; make silly putty and green flubber. STUDENTS ARE ASKED TO BRING A 100% COTTON T-SHIRT.

CFN910 Harry Potter:Magic Myst Sci (0-0-0)

All aboard for lots of hands-on-fun! Join in the escapades of Harry and his friends. Students (ages 6-11) will play quidditch, make an edible want and brew some fantastic potions to drink. Students will also create and watch some amazing chemical reactions as well watch a mirage appear and make some cool crystals. Wonder where the sorting hat will place you? Come find out!

CFN911 Artifact Preservation (0-0-0)

This course is for students who want to become more familiar with the preservation of historic and cultural material for future study. Students will learn how chemical, biological and environmental factors impact the integrity of objects. They will also learn how to prevent deterioration through cleaning, stabilization and consolidation using non-toxic and reversible methodologies. Students will learn how to assess objects for their condition, prepare treatment proposals, conduct conservation protocols and generate a final report of the object for display and long term storage.

CFN912 Horse Racing in Saratoga (0-0-0)

Saratoga Race Course is the oldest sporting venue of any kind in the United States - and the home of the world's best horse racing. We're lucky to live in this region, so close to this historic, beautiful track and the gorgeous horoughbreds who grace it every summer. Get ready for racing at the world's most exciting horse track - starting with Opening Day on July 15th! We'll get you ready to know where to sit, find great dining options and to bet with the best of 'em. Rider's UP!

CFN913 Horse Racing Industry (0-0-0)

Like any other sport, horse racing is complicated. Millions of people make their living in the industry, working in every facet you can imagine. Have you ever gone to the track and wondered who these people are, and how they got their jobs? This short course will give you all the information you need on horse racing, and a broad overview from an insider's perspective. Join us for this class, and learn about horses, racing and careers in the world's oldest and most awe-inspiring sport.

CFN914 Art of Performance (0-0-0)

High School students will explore elements of singing, acting, skit-writing, stage presence, projection and repertoire selection through instruction. As a group, these students will then perform a show case of works they have developed throughout the course. Students will learn how to warm-up vocally and stretch their range, sing melodies and harmonies, perform songs as solos and as a group, and develop scenes that are portrayed with quality speaking and timing choices.

CFN915 Managing Wkpl Conflicts (0-0-0)

This workshop delivers the tools of professional mediators into the hands of managers to build better workplace relationships, enhance performance, improve productivity, and cut the unnecessary financial costs associated with workplace conflict. In today's high-performance, dead- line oriented and bottom line-focused work environment, managers of employees must be equpped with the skills to negotiate relationships more effectively. As a result, every employeewho is responsible for the cooperative work of others requires the means to negotiate more productive work relationships and find solutions to business problems caused by conflict - even when none were thought possible. Workshop participants will benefit by learning the well- tested, highly successful techniques of professional work- place mediators and will further the efforts of their organizations through enhanced knowledge of vital core competencies for managers. Continuing Education units are available for this course.

CFN916 Aging and Creativity (0-0-0)

Creativity. What is it? Do I have it? How can I get it and what do I do with it once I have found it? Research has found that creativity and curiousity can have intensely positive effects on health as we age, keeping us happy, reducing our need for medicine and even protecting our risk of injury. Explore through interactive dicussion the many ways you can easily incorporate creativity and curiosity into your life.

CFN917 Tales of Art Historian (0-0-0)

Have you ever wondered why everyone around you seems to LOVE that crazy piece of art in your local contemporary art gallery while you just aren't sure what you're even looking at let alone whether you like it or not? Join us in discussing contemporary art and the stories behind some of America's most popular and famous (or infamous) pieces of art and the artists who made them.

CFN918 You're a YouTube Sensation (0-0-0)

Anyone can become a YouTube sensation. It's all about the idea, the execution of the idea and what your audience wants. This course prepares the novice to post a character, a story or a concept on YouTube to gain exposure. A YouTube sensation gets paid and becomes a repeat character with a following. Learn the success stories of real life sensations, create your own brand, identify your audience and learn to entertain them. This course will identify your goals, your competition and teach you to become a YouTube Sensation.

CFN919 Archeol in Schenectady (0-0-0)

This illustrated talk will highlight archaeological documentary and excavation projects undertaken by the SCCC Community Archaeology Program (CAP) in the Schenectady Stockade Historic District over the past decade. The presentation will also include information about SCCC's CAP non-credit certificate program and its individual courses that might be of interest and a display of recent excavations at 32 Front Street.

CFN920 Black History in Schenectady (0-0-0)

This course will examine the history of African- American people in the Capital District. Emphasis will be on African roots, transition to slavery, the Civil war and it's aftermath and more.

CFN921 Art of the Pitch (0-0-0)

This course will show the student how to best explain, describe or create enthusiasm and interest over their idea and/or product. Whatever it is that you want to pitch; whether it's an original novel or screenplay, a new business, a financial proposal or an innovative product; a brilliant idea must be packaged in such a way that each person listening to the pitch can not live without it. Come learn how to become the best pitch artist you can be!

CFN922 Art ExplorforChildren (0-0-0)

In this class, stduents (ages 6-11) will have the opportunity to explore different art mediums. They will produce perspective drawings, experiment with print making and zentables, explore string art, create texture prints, work with screen painting, learn about tissue art and much more. STUDENTS ARE ASKED TO BRING A SMOCK OR WEAR CLOTHING SUITABLE TO ARTWORK, WEAR CLOSED TOED SHOES AND BRING A SNACK AND WATER BOTTLE TO CLASS.

CFN923 The Art of Surrealism (0-0-0)

Students (ages 11-14) will explore the magic of surrealism through drawing, painting and collage. They will create a variety of drawings and paintings exploring perspective, optica illusions and various surrealist techniques. Students are asked to bring a smock or wear clothing suitable to artwork, wear closed toed shoes and bring a snack and water bottle to class.

CFN924 Story Telling Thru Art (0-0-0)

Students (ages 9-12) learn how to tell a story through art. They will learn new illustration techniques, create, their own picture book. Students are asked to bring a smock or wear clothing suitable to artwork, wear closed toed shoes and bring a snack and water bottle to class.

CFN925 Intro Museum Exhibits (0-0-0)

In this class, students will learn the basics of exhibit planning, organization and text writing. Students will also gain hands-on experience by researching, planning and installing a student generated exhibit at the Schenectady County Historical Society highlighting the Community Archaeology Program's (CAP) archaeological work at 32 Front Street in Schenectady's Historic Stockade District.

CFN926 Write that Grant (0-0-0)

This course will assist students in producing a solid five page draft of a grant proposal that can be modified as needed when applying to specific funders. Students are asked to e-mail the instructor at info@techknowprof.com prior to class for their first assignment. Class time will focus on review and revision of proposals. Pre-requisite: CFE 334 Get that Grant.

CFN927 PowerPoint Social Events (0-0-0)

Get step-by-step instructions in this hands-on workshop. Students will quickly make self-running photo shows with sound for birthday and anniversary parties, class reunions and memorial tributes. No PowerPoint skills required but students must have some basic computer skills.

CFN928 Comp/Internet Safe/Security (0-0-0)

If you think you're safe from cybercriminals just because you installed anti-virus software on your computer think again. Virus attacks are just one of the many dangers you face from scam artists, identity thieves, computer hijackers and worse every time you turn on your computer, open email, surf the Web, go on Facebook or use a wireless network. Learn the basic do's and don'ts everyone should follow for safer computing.

CFN929 Start Home Based Business (0-0-0)

So, you're thinking of starting a home based business? What steps should you take first to save yourself need- less expense? How can you get customers without expensive advertising? What, if any, technology and soft- ware do you need? This course will address these questions and more to help get you started on the road to that small business endeavor you've always dreamed of.

CFN930 Mail Labels w/ Excel and Word (0-0-0)

Need labels for large mailings suchas as business promotions, holiday cards and invitations? In this hands-on course, students will learn how to set up an address book in MS Excel and then create and print pages of labels using the mail merge function of MS Word. Students will also learn to use mail merge to form letters too!

CFN931 MS Office Business Templates (0-0-0)

Students will learn how to make business cards, memos, newsletters and more using ready-made MS Word templates. Students will also work with MS Excel templates for tracking business travel, inventories, business income, expenses and more!

CFN932 Public Speaking (0-0-0)

Students will learn to assess their own home site and design a landscape that fits their individual needs and desires. Topics such as soil amending, plant selection, proper plant- int, dividing perennials, pruning, lawn care and common pests and their management will be covered. This class will conclude with a garden field trip.

CFN933 CE: Visual Interpretation (0-0-0)

This 6 week slide-lecture series will begin in the 1660-80 period and then continue to 1900. The furniture discussed will be illustrated in both period room settings and close-ups which will picture the differences between formal versus country and the many regional variations from one area to another.

CFN934 Money Matters Small Business (0-0-0)

You've probably heard of social media. You may even under- stand the value social media can bring to your business. Now wondering how to start? This workshop will cover strategies and best practices to get the most out of your social media activities. Topics include what social media really is and why use it, an introduction to social media channels and how to create good content, etc.

CFN935 Power of Email Marketing (0-0-0)

E-mail is the most cost effective, targeted, trackable and efficient way to build and maintain relationships in all types of busines and organizations. This workshop will cover how to master e-mail marketing communications with a comprehensive look at best practices and winning strategies that lead to increased profits, revenue and participation. Topics include permission-based marketing, e-mail list building, increasing deliverability and open rates, and writing good subject lines, etc.

CFN936 Intro to Event Planning (0-0-0)

This workshop will introduce Constant Contact's tools and features. Students will learn the basics and some great tips and tricks to improve (or get started) with Constant Contact. Topics include creating an email campaign, selecting and editing e-mail templates, branding your emails, editing text, adding links, importing e-mails contacts, tracking and interpreting your results and much more.

CFN937 PowerPoint Redesign (0-0-0)



CFN938 Wedding and Event Planning (0-0-0)

Wedding and Event Planning Consultant Training is offered in partnership with the Association of Bridal Consultants (ABC.) This blended course offers 8 hours of in-class room instruction with on-line instruction from the convenience of your own home. Students will meet campus only on the following dates: Jan 22, Feb 26, April 23 and May 14, 2013. Areas of study include: wedding etiquette, sales and marketing, the wedding day, related services and planning and consulting. The course also includes scheduled in-class discussions led by by wedding professionals. This course provides a fabulous opportunity for the entrepreneur looking to start a business as well as professionals already in the business that would like to expand their knowledge on the entire wedding process A certificate of completion will be awarded by the ABC upon satisfactorily completing all five areas of study. Tuition includes a one-year membership to the Association of Bridal Consultants, “the standard for wedding excellence.”

CFN939 Volunteer Management (0-0-0)

This course will assist students in development a person- alized course of action for volunteering and a clear under- standing of how to identify and select the right volunteer opportunity. Topics will include an individual's role as a volunteer, the volunteer's obligations and liabilities, and provide web based resources to support interests and plans.

CFN940 Princ of Entrepreneurship (0-0-0)



CFN941 Exporting & Internat'l Trade (0-0-0)



CFN942 CSI (0-0-0)

Students (ages 8-12) will become super science sleuths. They will have fun learning about forensics, crime scene investigations, and crime lab chemistry as they perform as many as 15 different experiments designed to show just how those tricky cases are solved. They will search for the evidence, gather clues, and discover how science can help solve a mystery. Students will: dust for fingerprints, analyze handwriting, test for blood type using simulated blood, examine hair and clothing fibers, practice chemistry to identify mystery substances and much more. Students will then use their skills to solve crimes of the century.

CFN943 Hovercraft- DYO Vehicle (0-0-0)

Students (ages 6-11) will learn about the laws of motion, energy, air pressure, friction, lift, speed and acceleration in this hands-on course as they design, build and take home three different vehicles. First, students will design and build their own air powered Hovercraft. They will also design and build a supercar powered by more than an ounce of energy. Students will get a chance to be creative and use a variety of materials as they create this dynamic vehicle. Lastly, students will also get to build an egg drop car, a gravity vehicle that can cushion a raw egg as the car holding the egg is dropped from a high height.

CFN945 Chamber Music for Kids (0-0-0)



CFN946 Warrior Bootcamp Yoga (0-0-0)



CFN947 Kickboxing for Kids (0-0-0)

Introduce your child to the sport of kickboxing! Students (ages 6-12) will learn the punching, kicking, elbow and knee techniques used in kickboxing. Students will also learn to use various types of equipment including heavy bags, speed bags, uppercut bags, double-end and makiwara bags. Classes are fun, fast paced and interactive. STUDENTS SHOULD WEAR COMFORTABLE CLOTHING, SNEAKERS AND BRING A WATER BOTTLE. No equipment needed. This course will be taught at Electric City Boxing and Kickboxing lcoated at 271 State St., Schenectady, NY, (third floor).

CFN948 Boxing for Kids (0-0-0)

Introduce your child to the sport of boxing! Students (ages 6-12) will learn the basic punches and footwork used in boxing. Students will learn to use various types of boxing equipment including heavy bags, uppercut bags and double-end bags. Classes are fun, fast-paced and interactive. Students should wear comfortable clothing, sneakers and bring a water bottle. No equipment needed. This course will be taught at Electric City located at 271 State St., Schenectady, NY, (third floor).

CFN949 Intro Kickboxing for Adults (0-0-0)

Learn kickboxing for fitness and self-defense! Students will learn the punching, kicking, elbow and knee tehniques used in Kickboxing. They will also learn to use various types of equipment including heavy bags, speed bags, uppercut bags, double-end bags and makiwara bags. Classes are fun and fast-paced. Theyare great for cardio and calorie-burning. This class will be taught at Electric City Boxing and Kickboxing located at 271 State St., Schenectady, NY, (third floor). All ages and fitness levels are welcome. WEAR COMFORTABLE CLOTHING, SNEAKERS AND BRING A WATER BOTTLE. No equipment needed.

CFN950 Intro to Boxing for Adults (0-0-0)

Learn boxing for fitness and self-defense! Students will learn the basic punches used in boxing and practice directional footwork. They will also learn to use various types of boxing equipment including heavy bags, speed bags, uppercut bags and double-end bags. Classes are fun and fast-paced. They are great for cardio and calorie-burning. This class will be taught at Electric City Boxing and Kickboxing located at 271 State Street (third floor), Schenectady, NY. STUDENTS SHOULD WEAR COMFORTABLE CLOTHING, SNEAKERS AND BRING A WATER BOTTLE.

CFN951 Write Your Own Musical (0-0-0)

Learn to write a short musical with playwright/composer/lyricist, Kit Goldstein-Grant and Music educator/pianist, Rebecca Benjamin. Students, ages 7-12 years, will learn the basics of lyric witing, song form, and what goes into making a memorable melody. Together, the group will come up with a fun story and work together to write the songs to go with it! On the final day, students will perform a staged reading of their work for parents and friends. Students should bring a notebook, pencil and a bagged lunch.

CFN952 Playwriting for Adults (0-0-0)

This course will cover the fundamentals of playwriting for students ages 13-18 years. It will use exercises and work shopping to help students begin transforming their original ideas into plays. Students will work outside of class to complete outlines and scenes that will be read and discussed in class.

CFN953 Playwriting for Adults (0-0-0)

This course will cover the fundamentals of playwriting. It will use exercises and work shopping to help students begin transforming their original ideas into plays. Students will work outside of class to complete outlines and scenes that will be read and discussed in class. Both beginning playwrights and those with more experience are welcome. REQUIRED COURSE MATEIALS: PLEASE PURCHASE THE BOOK, Playwriting, Brief & Billiant by Julie Jensen.

CFN954 Transition Schenectady (0-0-0)

New to constant Contact Email Marketing? Want to learn some great tools and tips so you can start using Constant Contact like a pro? In this highly practical live guided demonstration, we'll inroduce Constant Contact's tools and features. Students will learn the basics and some great tips and tricks to improve (or get started) with E-mail Marketing.

CFN955 Grow Bus w/E-mail & Soc Media (0-0-0)

This course is designed to give small businesses and non-profit organizations some simple ideas for growing their organizations using e-mail marketing and social media. Topics include what to write about, how to get more people to stop and read your messages and how to get more people to stop and read your messages and how to get more action (or reaction) to your messages and offers. Students will learn what it means to run a campaign and tactics for measuring success without spending a lot of time or money. The course will also touch on Facebook,using images for higher impact and cover the importance of mobile-friendly content for higher engagement.

CFN956 Songwriting (0-0-0)

This course will focus on the technical elements of songwriting. Students will work on writing their own songs while learning the basics of song form, lyric writing, rhyme, melody and harmony. THE ABILITY TO READ MUSIC IS STRONGLY RECOMMENDED.

CFN957 Zumba Sentao (0-0-0)

Grab a chair, feel the beat and learn how to use your own body weight to enhance muscle strength, improve defintion, endurance and tone your physique. No experience is necessary. STUDENTS ARE ASKED TO PLEASE WEAR SNEAKERS AND BRING A WATER BOTTLE.

CFN958 Put the Pow in PowerPoint (0-0-0)

If you want to create PowerPoint presentations that really grab your audience and sell your message, then start with a good design. This class will teach students strategies for actively engaging their audience and telling their story effectively. By applying a few simple guidelines for slide design, students will also learn why flying bullets, special effects and flashy animations are the enemies of effective communication. STUENTS WILL NEED BASIC COMPUTER SKILLS AND KNOW HOW TO WORK WITH IMAGES AND TEXT. STUDENTS ARE ASKED TO BRING THEIR POWERPOINT FILES ON A FLASH DRIVE TO CLASS.

CFN959 How to Buy Computers, Printers (0-0-0)

New computer and printer models come on the market every few months and your choices can feel overwhelmig. This course will help students decide what types of new computers; printers or accessories such as external backup drives, mice, keyboards, and other peripherals to purchase. Students will learn to identify which features and products that are right for them, learn where to find reliable product (and company) reviews, how to talk to sales staff and which questions to ask.

CFN960 Take Command of Your Email (0-0-0)

If your starting to feel overwhelmed by your inbox, then this is the course for you. Students will learn how tomake gorup addresse for clubs or family, hw to push all messages from a certain e-mail address into their own folder, get rid of spam and learn where deleted messages go. This class will cover basics for Hotmail/Outlook, Gmail and Yahoo.

CFN961 Chair Hatha Yoga (0-0-0)

If you are a senior, new to exercise or have a disablility that makes exercise difficult, chair yoga may be the answer. Chair yoga uses many traditional yoga poses and modifies them to be done from a chair or with the assistance of a chair allowing more stability and greater ease in doing the poses without the worry, while still getting the benefit of yoga. The Hatha yoga focused on in this class concentrates on breathing techniques that can help lower heart rate and blood pressure, decrease anxiety and nervousness and aid pulmonary function. In addition, the yoga postures can relieve stiff joints and muscles and help with balance and coordination.

CFN962 What Small Bus Owners Need to (0-0-0)

The course will provide an overview of the Affordable Care Act. It will cover mandates and requirements of the Small Business within the ACA such as businesses with 50 or more employees, businesses with less than 50 employees, sole proprietors, the individual application process, the four benefit levels, consumer assistance and more. Students will discuss implementation of the ACA within the business.

CFN963 Teaching Technique/Methodology (0-0-0)



CFN964 Basic Cookie Decorating (0-0-0)

In this course, students will get an introduction to decorating cookies with royal icing using piping bags and decorating bottles. After an icing and cookie making demonstration, students will decorate a dozen cookies with frosting made in class. Students will get to take their cookies home. Students are required to purchase a $20 cookie decorating kit, which will be distributed in class.

CFN965 Writing a Business Plan (0-0-0)

This entrepreneurial class will teach stduents how to write a business plan, section by section. Students will learn how to write their story in the approved business plan format recognized by lenders such as 1st Niagra, Key Bank, and Citizen's Bank. Topics include creation of a business description, statement of purpose, competitive and marketing strategy formation, market research, management and personnel, financial statements, risk analysis, and the assembly of the final product.

CFN966 Email MKT W/Constant Contact (0-0-0)

E-mail is the most cost-effective, targeted, trackable and efficent way to build and maintain relationships in all types of buisnesses and organizations. This workshop will teach you how to master e-mail marketing communications with a comprehensive look at best practices and winning strategies that lead to increased profits, revenue and participation. Topics will include what is permission-based e-mail marketing, e-mail list bulding, writing good subject lines and content, tracking results and how e-mail and social media marketing work together.

CFN967 Writing Fundamentals (0-0-0)

This introductory writing course will focus on the basics of writing. Aspiring writers will not only learn the rules of grammar and writing, spelling and sentence structure but will also work on writing assignments that will give the student a solid foundation from which to begin their journey into the wonderful word of writing.

CFN968 Preparing for Tomorrow's Gap (0-0-0)



CFN969 Intro to Ceramic Preservation (0-0-0)

In this course, students will learn to research and identify ceramic objects. Students will be introduced to the vast world of ceramic mending and restoration. Topics also include the history of ceramics.

CFN970 Equine Journalism (0-0-0)

There are many equine publications that cater to the hunger for information about horses. The existence of a membership organization like American Horse Publications is testimony to the enormous popularity of the horse and the many outlets for horse-loving writers and would-be writers. This course will teach the student how to write blogs, websites, and articles for newpapers or magazines or even write a book or screenplay. The aim of this course is to teach you the principles, and help you find your place in the equine media world.

CFN971 Amer Red Cross: Pet First Aid (0-0-0)

Dogs and cats are more than pets – they’re family. Just like any other member of the family, pets deserve to be cared for and protected. Red Cross Dog First Aid and Cat First Aid courses will teach you how to respond to health emergencies and provide basic first aid for the four-legged members of your family. Practice and preparation will help you be calm and effective in an emergency, protecting you and your pet from further injury of suffering.

CFN972 Customer Service Excellence (0-0-0)

Image is how the customer sees your business. Learn the many pieces of buisness image that influence customers and potential clients when they choose a company for transacting business. Master the parts of your company's image to maximize your revenue opportunities. Students will learn how to measure the many facet of image to guarantee that the best a business has to offer shines each time.

CFN973 Amer Red Cross: Adult & Pediat (0-0-0)

Learn the skills that can save a life. The First Aid and CPR/AED course teaches people how to perform CPR and use an AED, what to do if someone is choking, and how to prevent and respond to other emergencies until advanced medical help arrives. Course participants also learn how to control bleeding as well as how to care for seizures and other sudden illnesses.

CFN974 HR Strategic Persuasion & Inf. (0-0-0)

Strategic persuasion and strategic influencing are major growth areas for many HR professionals who need to improve persuasion skills and better promote, influence or provide education for the services or programs they have to offer. In this program, HR professionals will learn to reframe their paradigms in a way that teaches the application of unique processes for influencing and persuasion. They will learn to deliver the process, resulting in promoting improvements. They will also learn techniques that they can utilize the next time they are faced with a business development or organizational change. In the persuasion module, HR professionals will develop their leadership skills when presenting policies, organizational ethics or any topic that has direct impact on the mission, values or the company's strategic goals and objectives. The influencing module will assist HR professionals to create a unique proposition concept to apply to their endeavors. The HR professionals wil learn the keys to create a marketing plan to promote and convince both company leaders and employees to understand the value of new or changing policies and procedures that can be aggressively implemented such as changes in ownership, restructuring or re-engineering. This module also focuses on critical thinking skills that better facilitate the HR professional to affect measure outcomes for their objectives and will demonstrate developing skills to influence others through modeling and coaching.

CFN975 Amer Red Cross: Babysitting (0-0-0)



CFN976 Intro to Acrylic Painting (0-0-0)

Never thought you could do yoga? Try this 4-week introductory class on Adaptive Yoga basics. Traditional yoga poses done with the aid of a chair. No getting up and down off the floor. Learn how to move your body. We’ll work on breathing, balance, coordination and stretching. Wear comfortable clothes, bring a yoga mat, if you have one, for under your chair and a bottle of water. If you’ve never done yoga before or if you have physical limitations, this class is for you. Come feed your Mind, Body & Soul. Everyone is welcome.

CFN977 Songwriting for Kids (0-0-0)



CFN978 Edible Crafts for Young Bakers (0-0-0)



CFN979 Intro to Adaptive Yoga (0-0-0)



CFN989 Individual Songwriting Lessons (0-0-0)



CFP001 Basic EMT Training (0-0-0)



CFP002 EMT Refresher (0-0-0)



CFP100 Archeol Research (0-0-0)



CFP101 Independent Arch. Project (0-0-0)



CFP102 Native American Archaeology (0-0-0)



CFP103 Lab Practices & Site Study (0-0-0)



CFP104 Trade, Colonial & 19th Pottery (0-0-0)



CFP105 Analysis Fre & Indian War Site (0-0-0)



CFP106 Historical Arch & Field Study (0-0-0)



CFP108 Research/Interpret Arch Docs (0-0-0)



CFP109 Archaeol Field Work Program (0-0-0)



CFP110 Int to Ceramic Presrv Rst & Id (0-0-0)



CFP150 Intro to Acrylics (0-0-0)



CFP151 Int to Hand Paint Kilm Fir Art (0-0-0)



CFP200 Starting a Home Based Business (0-0-0)



CFP201 Notary Public Review (0-0-0)



CFP202 Marketing: Newsletters/Surveys (0-0-0)



CFP203 Marketing:Offers & Promotions (0-0-0)



CFP204 Build Your Leadership Skills (0-0-0)



CFP205 Impact of Bus Env on Bus Prof (0-0-0)



CFP206 Ntwrkng Its All Abt Who You Kn (0-0-0)



CFP300 Piano Lesson: Children & Teens (0-0-0)



CFP301 Ukulele Lessons:Child & Teens (0-0-0)



CFP302 Music theory Lessons for Teens (0-0-0)



CFP303 Driver's Education (0-0-0)



CFP304 Intro to Acrylics for Teens (0-0-0)



CFP305 Guitar Lessons for Children (0-0-0)



CFP306 Voice Lessons for Child & Teen (0-0-0)



CFP307 Musical Theater for Vocalists (0-0-0)



CFP400 Maintaining Peak PC Protection (0-0-0)



CFP401 Intro to Power Point (0-0-0)



CFP402 Intermediate Excel (0-0-0)



CFP403 Comp/Internet Safety& Security (0-0-0)



CFP404 Take Command of Your Email (0-0-0)



CFP405 Web Options for Small Business (0-0-0)



CFP406 Building a Free Website (0-0-0)



CFP407 Intro to Adobe Photoshop (0-0-0)



CFP415 Intermed Excel (0-0-0)



CFP500 Bagels and Bialys (0-0-0)



CFP501 Cream Puffs and Eclairs (0-0-0)



CFP502 Puff & Assorted Pastries (0-0-0)



CFP503 Cake Decorating as a Hobby (0-0-0)



CFP504 Basic Cookie Decorating (0-0-0)



CFP505 Cert. Spec. Wine Exam Prep (0-0-0)



CFP506 Edible Holiday Crafts (0-0-0)



CFP507 Knife Skills&Basic Cookin Tech (0-0-0)



CFP508 Pies and Tarts (0-0-0)



CFP600 Piano Lessons for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP601 Ukelele Lessons for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP602 Group Piano for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP603 More Group Piano for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP604 Guitar Lessons for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP605 Songwriting for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP606 Voice Lessons for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP700 Playwriting for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP701 Acting for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP702 Horicultre Lrn to Idntfy Plnts (0-0-0)



CFP703 Conversational Spanish (0-0-0)



CFP704 Discover the Actor Inside (0-0-0)



CFP800 Aikido for Adults (0-0-0)



CFP801 Adaptive Hatha Yoga (0-0-0)



CFP802 Zumba Fitness (0-0-0)



CFP803 Intro to Iaido (0-0-0)



CFR112 BRG:Medical/Legal Office Pract (0-0-0)



CFR113 BRG:Intro to Computers (0-0-10)



CFR151 Routing Efficiency (0-0-0)



CFR152 Transportation Management (0-0-0)



CFR501 Intro to EMS Careers (0-0-0)



NTR161 Intr to Human Nutrition (3-0-3)

This course is designed to explain the role of nutrition in health maintenance. The food sources, functions and interrelationships of the six major nutrient categories are discussed as well as energy requirements and balance. The principles of nutrient needs throughout the life cycle are applied to nutritional assessment, menu planning and food preparation. This course is not acceptable as a science or liberal arts course. PR: two years of high school science

PAL111 Survey of American Law (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to the law and legal system of the United States and the individual states. It first examines the roles of the participants from lawmakers and judges to attorneys, legal assistants and litigants. Ethical considerations for these parties are also discussed. Sources of law and the part played by each branch of government in producing law is analyzed. Broad areas of substantive law relating to contracts, torts, crimes, property and personal rights are examined, with the focus on constitutional, statutory and common law developments in these areas. F,S

PAL112 Legal Research (3-0-3)

This course is designed to equip students with the skills necessary to accurately and efficiently research virtually any topic in the law. In addition to providing a background for understanding the tools used, students are taught the fundamental techniques of how to find applicable legal principles and authority among primary and secondary sources of law. Methods for updating the law, through the use of Shepard's Citations and other tools, are presented so that the legal research product will be accurate and timely. PR: PAL 111 F,S

PAL114 Courts and Litigation (3-0-3)

This course surveys New York and federal courts and jurisdiction, and focuses on procedure, concentrating on New York civil practice. Studies in legal research are continued with emphasis placed on the preparation of forms, briefs, affidavits and pleadings. PR: PAL 111 F,S

PAL217 Estates and Trusts (3-0-3)

This course is a study of the substantive and procedural laws of estates, trusts, guardianships, fiduciaries, and estate taxation. PR: PAL 111, PAL 112 F

PAL219 Real Property (3-0-3)

This course introduces the law of real property and terminology of real estate interests and conveyances. Real property instruments are defined and examined, including the different types and nature of contracts, deeds, mortgages and leases. Acquisition and loss of real property interests by means other than deeds (such as adverse possession, prescription and inheritance) are also examined. Students prepare an abstract of title by examining recorded instruments. PR: PAL 111 F,S

PAL231 Family Law (3-0-3)

This course is a study of the law of domestic relations and family law. This includes the substantive laws of marriage, adoption, divorce, annulment, separation, family obligations, children's rights and procedural laws concerning Family Court proceedings. Also included will be experience in the drafting of documents and instruments related to the aforesaid subjects. PR: PAL 111 F,S

PAL233 Administrative Law (3-0-3)

This course is a study of the nature and sources of administrative law, special problems relating thereto and the place of administrative action in our governmental and legal systems. PR: PAL 111 and 112 F,S

PAL250 Paralegal Internship (3-0-3)

This course provides the paralegal student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study, and field work within selected professional entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience is enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate paralegal related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester. PR: Matriculation in the Paralegal program, completion of 30 credit hours, completion of PAL 111, PAL 112, PAL 114, minimum overall G.P.A. of 2.5, and permission of the department S

PHI141 Survey of Major Western Philosophers (3-0-3)

This course provides an introductory survey of the major trends and developments in Western philosophical thought- particularly in metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, theology, aesthetics, and political philosophy-from the ancient Greeks to the present. By adopting a historical perspective, the course traces that development through the contributions of major representative thinkers and movements. Students will be encouraged to examine and revise their own philospohical positions or beliefs.

PHI143 Introduction to Philosophical Problems (3-0-3)

Focusing on issues in epistemology, ontology, philosophy of religion and freedom, ethics, political and social philosophy, and philosophy of art, this course introduces students to the most important questions that have preoccupied Western philosophers and to representative attempts by those philosophers to answer those questions. The course will also consider significant contributions to the discussion of those questions by experts from other fields, such as physics and biology. Students will be encouraged to examine and revise their own philosophical positions or beliefs.

PHY106 Meteorology (3-0-3)

This course covers the fundamental concepts of meteorology including meteorological instruments and observation, synoptic chart interpretation, air masses, fronts, fog formation and dissipation, and severe weather. Also covered are weather reporting and forecasting and the dissemination of meteorological information. Students will be required to access and untilize the World Wide Web to review and formulate web-based weather strategies. PR: One year of high school science

PHY120 Physical Science I (3-0-3)

This is one of a two-course sequence for the non-science major designed to provide an overview of the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth science and space science. It covers the fundamentals of physics and space science; topics include the concepts of force, motion, energy, electricity, light, formation of the solar system, lifecycle of stars and classification of galaxies. In addition, the course will focus on the development and application of the scientific method, the relationships among the various physical sciences and the role of physical science in interpreting the world around us. Knowledge of basic algebra and mathematical skills is required. Conceptual understanding of physical principles will be stressed rather than their mathematical interpretations. PR: Two years of high school math

PHY121 Physical Science II (3-0-3)

This is one of a two-course sequence for the non-science major designed to provide an overview of the basic concepts of physics, chemistry, earth science and space science. It covers the fundamentals of chemistry and earth science; topics include the atomic nature of matter, states of matter, changes of state, chemical reactions, the rock cycle, how chemical elements are cycled, the atmosphere and hydrosphere. In addition, the course will focus on the development and application of the scientific method, the relationships among the various physical sciences and the role of physical sciences in interpreting the world around us. Knowledge of basic algebra is required. Conceptual understanding of physical principles will be stressed rather than their mathematical interpretations. PR: Two years of high school math

PHY153 Physics I (3-3-4)

This course uses algebra, trigonometry and geometry to describe forces, kinematics, dynamics, and conservation laws. The following topics are covered: translation motion, torque, friction, projectile motion, momentum, rotational motion, simple harmonic motion, sound and thermodynamics. Vector algebra will be used extensively. This course cannot be used toward the Math/Science or Computer Science degree. PR: MAT 129 F

PHY154 Physics II (3-3-4)

This course is the second part of a one-year sequence. It uses algebra, trigonometry and geometry to describe fluids, electricity, magnetism, and optics. The following topics are covered: fluids at rest, electric force and field, potential, capacitance, current, resistance, DC circuits, magnetic force and fields, AC currents reflection, refraction, mirror lenses and gratings. This course cannot be used toward the Math/Science or Computer Science degree. PR: MAT 129 or higher S

PHY221 College Physics I (3-3-4)

The course uses a calculus-based problem solving approach to describe kinematics, dynamics, conservation laws and sound. The following topics are covered: force, friction, translational and rotational motion, torque, momenta, periodic motion and sound. PR or CR: MAT 180 F

PHY222 College Physics II (3-3-4)

The course is the second part of a one-year sequence. It uses a calculus-based problem solving approach to describe electricity, magnetism, induction, and optics. The following topics are covered: electric force and field, Gauss's Law, electric potential, capacitance and dielectrics, current, resistance and EMF, DC circuits, magnetic force and field, electromagnetic induction, AC circuits, geometric optics and wave optics. PR/CR: MAT 181 PR: PHY 221 S

POL123 United States Government and Politics (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the institutions, structures, and processes of the United States federal government. It examines political theories; the Constitution; federalism; the three branches of government and the federal bureaucracy; political parties and elections; civil liberties and civil rights; the role of the media, interest groups, and social movements; and the interrelationship of economic and political power.

PSY121 Introduction to Psychology (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the major theories and concepts in contemporary psychology. Topics covered include the approaches and research methods of psychology, the biological basis of behavior, sensation and perception, learning and memory, consciousness, motivation and emotion, intelligence, personality, social psychology, and mental illness. F,S

PSY221 Educational Psychology (3-0-3)

This course provides students with an introduction to research-based concepts and principles about human learning, development and motivation and how that information is applied to classroom teaching. Emphasis is placed on learning theory and design of instruction through identification of learning outcomes, effective teaching strategies and assessment procedures. The role and methods of service learning are explored and applied through classroom instruction and the development of a service learning plan. PR: PSY 121

PSY222 Developmental Psychology (3-0-3)

This course offers an overview of the process of development from prenatal development through aging. It provides an understanding of the developmental process by examining the areas of biological changes, personality and social development, cognitive and moral development, and psychosocial influences across the life span. The impact of cultural factors upon development are also explored. PR: PSY 121 F, S

PSY223 Adolescent Psychology (3-0-3)

Students will study human development from puberty to young adulthood. They will examine the adolescent in terms of biological, cognitive, social, and emotional domains. Normal development will be emphasized, but special issues will be investigated. The impact of cultural factors will be explored. PR: PSY 121 S

PSY224 Abnormal Psychology (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to a wide range of mental disorders as recognized in the current Diagnostic Statistical Manual (DSM). It examines the biological, psychological and sociocultural approaches to the study of abnormal psychology, as well as the assessment, diagnosis, and treatment process. PR: PSY 121 F, S

PSY225 Introduction to Special Education (3-2-4)

This course is an introduction to the education of exceptional children. Characteristics of the various exceptionalities as well as laws, policies, and procedures affecting students with special needs are explored. Emphasis is placed on identifying quality learning environments that ensure the inclusion of every child, and current practices for teaching children with diverse learning and developmental needs. The methods and strategies for teaching and including children with special needs are discussed and applied. Students observe 30 hours in an environment serving children with special needs.

PSY226 Social Psychology (3-0-3)

This course is designed to introduce students to the major theoretical concepts in the study of social psychology. It will examine the nature and causes of individual behavior and thought in social situations with emphasis on how social behavior is shaped by culture, evolution, personal construal, and situational variables. Topics covered include research methods, the nature of the social self, social judgments and attitudes, emotion, social relationships, stereotyping and prejudice, altruism, and social behavjior in groups. PR: PSY 121 or SOC 121

PSY230 Child Development (4-0-4)

This course is a study into the principles of child growth and development from conception to adolescence. The course content will focus on the physical, cognitive, social and emotional domains of development. The student will be required to observe the development of a child outside the classroom in order to complete a comprehensive child study project. In order to complete this major project, 10-20 hours of outside observation are required.

PSY235 The Psychology of Sport (3-0-3)

This course will examine the major psychological theories related to sport and exercise behavior. The course is designed to introduce students to the field of sports and exercise psychology by providing a broad overview of the major topics in the area, including the history of sports and exercise psychology, foundations of personality, motivation, coaching and leadership, gender and cultural issues, team dynamics, performance enhancement strategies, and sports as recreation. PR: PSY 121 or SOC 121

PSY240 Human Sexuality (3-0-3)

This course is an introductory overview of the field of human sexuality. Human sexuality will be examined from psychological, biological, sociocultural and historical perspectives. Students will be encouraged to become aware of their own sexual attitudes, values, and behaviors and to evaluate the consistency of their behaviors within their own moral frameworks. By the end of the course, students will be able to communicate about sexuality with a greater degree of effectiveness and personal comfort. PR: PSY 121 or SOC 121

PSY299 Independent Study (3-0-3)



REL121 World Religions (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to major religions of the world including Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The course explores each religion's history, beliefs, and practices, and its contemporary context. The course pays particular attention to the differences between the religions, the similarities among them, and the ways in which they interact with each other.

REL999 Religion Elective (3-0-3)



RES999 Restricted Elective (0-0-4)



SOC121 Sociology (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the basic patterns of social behavior and the structure and functions of social organizations. Emphasis is placed on research, culture and cultural change, socialization and deviance, population and social stratification, and social institutions. F, S

SOC122 Social Problems (3-0-3)

This course provides an orientation to the study of social problems and an analysis of several contemporary issues. The number of topics discussed, the emphasis, and order will vary with the instructor. The topics selected may include, but are not limited to, the following: addiction, crime, ecological and energy issues, education, physical and mental health issues, poverty, prejudice and discrimination, social sexual issues, urban issues, research methodology, and violence. F, S

SOC125 Introduction to Social Work and Social Welfare (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the theoretical, philosophical, historical and ethical dimensions of the social work profession in the United States. It introduces students to core social work theories and skills and to the best practices associated with them. This course presents current theories and issues in social work affecting local, state and national social programs, agencies, and individuals. F,S

SOC127 Interpersonal and Group Dynamics (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to interpersonal and group dynamics and the theories of leadership and of conflict resolution. There is a particular emphasis on applying individual and group communication dynamics within a professional setting. The course requires students to design and implement a service-learning project. F,S

SOC222 Sociology of the Family (3-0-3)

This course focuses on family dynamics in the United States in historical and cross-cultural context. It examines family structure, organization, dissolution, and services, as well as internal and external influences, and marital and nonmarital relationships. PR: SOC 121 or SOC 122

SOC224 Sociology of Aging (3-0-3)

This course cexamines aging on both the individual and societal levels including the psychological and physiological aspects of aging. Demographic composition, societal aspects in relation to that composition, and social policy are discussed in light of how they may affect quality of life for the elderly and in society in general. PR: SOC 121 or SOC 122

SOC228 Minority-Majority Relations in U.S. (3-0-3)

This course covers past, current, and anticipated trends in relations between minority and majority groups in the United States. It emphasizes interactions between dominant and subordinate groups such as those based on gender, sexual orientation, or disability. Prejudice and discrimination are discussed, as well as alternate strategies to reduce both. PR: SOC 121 or SOC 122

SPA115 Conversational Spanish I (3-0-3)

This is a beginning course in Spanish which emphasizes oral communication in a variety of topics at a basic level. It covers only that grammar and structure absolutely necessary for speaking. The course is intended for students with no previous knowledge of the Spanish language. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. F,S

SPA116 Conv Spanish II (3-0-3)

The purpose of this course is to further the students' conversational skills in Spanish. In addition to new vocabulary, the past tense and other useful grammatical points will be covered. As in the first course, there will be great emphasis on developing the students' speaking ability. The students will create their own dialogues on specified topics, and will be responsible for several readings and several short compositions. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: SPA 115 or permission of instructor

SPA121 Elementary Spanish I (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to the Spanish language for students with no previous Spanish studies or one year of high school Spanish. It develops elementary Spanish grammar, syntax, and communication skills. It also examines the culture of Spanish- speaking people throughout the world. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab. The course requires the completion of five documented hours of lab work outside of class.

SPA122 Elementary Spanish II (3-0-3)

This course is for students who have completed SPA 121 or two years of high school Spanish. It further develops grammar, syntax, and communication skills. Additionally, it examines the civilization, culture and customs of Spanish-speaking people. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab. The course requires the completion of five documented hours of lab work outside of class. PR: SPA 121 or two years of high school Spanish

SPA222 Intermediate Spanish I (3-0-3)

Intermediate Spanish I is for students who have completed one year' of Elementary Spanish or three years of high school Spanish. This course reinforces fundamental Spanish skills through a variety of reading, writing, and oral exercises. The course also expands students' knowledge of the civilizations, cultures, and customs of Spanish-speaking people. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: SPA 122 or three years of high school Spanish

SPA224 Intermediate Spanish II (3-0-3)

Intermediate Spanish II is designed for students who have completed SPA 222 or four years of high school Spanish. this course develops intermediate Spanish skills through a variety of reading, writing, and oral exercises. Additionally, it further expands students' knowledge of the cultures and customs of the comtemporary Spanish-speaking world. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language laboratory is required per term. PR: SPA 222 or 4 years of high school Spanish

SPE121 Introduction to Speech (3-0-3)

In this introductory course students have an opportunity to gain skill, confidence, and fluency in public speaking. Students develop an understanding of both basic communication principles and public speaking strategies through their application of these principles to a variety of speaking assignments. F, S

SDS001 SGA Election (0-0-0)



SDS002 Online Orientation (0-0-0)



SCM121 Global Supply Chain Management (3-0-3)

This course introduces the dynamic nature of supply chain management for products and services and addresses the impact of the global economy on the management process. Topics covered include formulating strategies for superior customer service, quality, logistics, inventory management, performance measurement, information management, and integrated supplychain management in a highly competitive global market.

SCM145 Inventory Contr & Warehse Mgt (3-0-3)

This course introduces the importance of effective inventory control and warehousing operations as a potential major source of competitive advantage to an organization. Topics include the basics of production planning and control, forecasting, the fundamentals of inventory management, the physical inventory and warehouse management functions, effective distribution systems, and how operating planning and control systems relate to just-in-time and lean production.

SCM221 Transportation Management (3-0-3)

This transportation management course explores the role of transportation as a critical link in global supply chain management. Topics covered include an examination of the external forces impacting supply chain management, the various modes of transportation and their current operations and the various critical transportation management issues and challenges facing today's supply chain managers.

SCM225 Princ of Operations Management (3-0-3)

This operations management course introduces the student to an area of management concerned with overseeing, designing and controlling the process of production and designing business operations in the production of goods and services. It introduces a set of activities that creates value in the form of goods and services by transforming inputs into outputs. Topics covered include a global view of operations, project management, forecasting, designing operations, and managing operations. PR: MAT 126

SCM230 Purchasing & Logistics Mgt (3-0-3)

This course introduces the role of purchasing and procurement in supply chain management. Topics include building supplier relationships, sourcing, price theory, procurement, production, quality assurance, inventory, warehousing, logistics and customer relations. In addition, the course introduces standard policies and operating procedures, negotiation techniques, planning, organization and the legal aspects of purchasing. The ethical conduct associated with purchasing and procurement functions is also studied.

SCM240 Fund of Internat'l Logistics (3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to the concepts that are important to global managers who are actively exporting or importing goods or are otherwise involved in international trade operations. Topics covered include documentation, terms of payment, terms of trade, exchange rates, exposure, international insurance, customs clearance, agency and distributorship sales contracts, packaging, transportation, and security issues. PR: MGT 135

SCM250 Logistics Application of ERP (3-0-3)

This logistics applications course examines how an Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) system can be an important means to upgrade the quality of information systems. The course provides an understanding of the issues affecting ERP systems and the implementation of ERP in a competitive global environment. PR: SCM 121

SCM999 Supply Chain Mgt Elective (0-0-4)



TET221 Foundations of Education (3-0-3)

The course introduces the historical, sociological, and philosophical aspects of the American education system. It emphasizes the school's role and its responsibility to create productive members of society by meeting the needs of all learners. This course provides an understanding of the structure and mission of present-day school and of laws and education mandates. It provides students with an awareness of culturally responsive teaching practices that support learning styles, gender, sexual orientation, culture, and socio-economic status. Students will spend a minimum of ten field experience hours in an educational setting. F, S

TET252 Pre-professional Seminar (1-0-1)

This capstone Seminar is intended for TET majors who are about to graduate and transfer to senior institutions. Observations and course work are used to review and analyze knowledge and skills that have been acquired throughout coursework. Opportunities are provided for students to acquire additional supervised observation hours. Apre-professional protfolio serves as a summative experience. PR: Permission of the division

TET999 Education Elective (0-0-4)



TEL121 Introduction to Information Systems (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the use and management of information systems and technology that support the business activities of an organization. Topics covered include the foundations of information systems in business, using information technology for strategic advantage, ethics and privacy issues, information security, and data resource management. The course also addresses e-commerce, wireless and mobile computing, organizational information systems, customer relationship management, supply chain management, managerial support systems, and acquiring information systems.

TEL221 Data Communications (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to the concepts and systems of modern communications and provides a solid foundation in the technology of the field. Topics to be covered include system equipment components and their performance capabilities, carriers and their services, data networks, data link controls, and legislation/regulations pertinent to data communications. PR: TEL 121 S


Last Updated: 11/23/14 08:04pm ET
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