Course Descriptions - All Disciplines
FYS100 First Year Seminar (1-0-1)

This course introduces students to strategies and college resources that enhance their success as college students. The course focus is on developing academic and personal skills, setting goals, and exploring discipline-specific topics.

ACC111 College Accounting (3-0-3)

This course concentrates on the generally accepted accounting principles (GAAP) applied to a sole proprietorship. Topics include: analyzing, journalizing and posting transactions, adjusting entries, completion of the work sheet, financial statements, and the closing process for a service business, Accounting for Cash, Payroll Accounting and the Combination Journal are also covered.

ACC121 Financial Accounting (4-0-4)

This course introduces current procedures of financial accounting and Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). The course emphasizes the analysis of business transactions and the study of the accounting cycle. Topical areas in the course include accrual-based accounting concepts, internal controls; financial statement preparation; and accounting elements of a corporate business entity. An Excel-based software is utilized to practice and complete many of the problems. Ethical accounting standards are embedded throughout the course materials.

ACC122 Managerial Accounting (4-0-4)

This course introduces current managerial accounting concepts, theories and practices applicable to manufacturing, retail and service industries. Job order, process cost and activity-based cost systems are introduced. Topics include budgeting, profit analysis, product pricing and reporting concerns of decentralized operations. Students utilize an Excel-based software system to practice and complete many of the problems. Ethical issues are discussed throughout the course. PR: ACC 121

ACC123 Accounting for Decision Making - Concepts and Theory (3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to financial accounting. Emphasis is on the analysis and interpretation of financial information. Generally accepted accounting principles will be discussed throughout the course. The standard reports of financial accounting will be studied as well as the process of identifying, measuring, recording and reporting financial information. Internal control procedures, corporate assets, liabilities, and shareholders' equity will also be studied as well as reporting concerns of international companies. Interpretation and analysis of financial reports and current issues affecting these reports will be stressed. Corporate financial statements will be reviewed in and out of class via the Internet. PR: MAT 127 or equivalent F

ACC201 Computer Applications in Accounting (1-0-1)

This course provides the student with basic computer skills specific to a financial accounting environment. Topics include setting up a business entity's accounting system, recording financial transactions, and working with budget development and evaluation. Students will create invoices, create and analyze accounts receivable and payment aging reports, and develop financial statements and reports with the assistance of a software application. Students will be required to use computers to complete projects. Outside laboratory work is required. This course is pass/fail PR: ACC 111 or ACC 121 or ACC 123 S

ACC222 Intermediate Accounting I (3-0-3)

This course gives intensive consideration to financial accounting theory and the current application of Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP). A significant amount of time is devoted to financial statement preparation and presentation. Emphasis is placed on the balance sheet and its various accounts. Topics covered include the accounting cycle, measurement of income, acquisition and disposal of assets, and the time value of money. PR: ACC 122

ACC225 Income Tax Accounting (3-0-3)

This course introduces the current income tax law and tax regulations for individuals and certain business entities. Specific tax situations are presented and analyzed in accordance with the taxation rules set forth by the Internal Revenue Code and other primary tax sources such as case law. Topics include an examination of what constitutes income, acceptable duductions, analysis of property transactions, alternative minimum taxation, and recent legislation. Individual tax forms are prepared.

ACC226 Intermediate Accounting II (4-0-4)

This course is a continuation of the study of financial accounting theory and practice. Specific accounts are examined including current and contingent liabilities, bonds, notes, corporate income taxes, leases, capital stock, pensions, and retaining earnings. Preparation of financial statements in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP) and International Financial Reporting Standards (IFRS) are also covered. Financial statement analysis, revenue recognition rules, and accounting changes, and other topics are addressed. Excel- based web software systems re utilized in and outside of the classroom to complete assignments. PR: ACC 222

ACC242 Cost Management (3-0-3)

In this advanced course students develop an understanding of accounting information used by management in planning and controlling operations. A framework for measuring managerial performance is developed through an analytical treatment of cost behavior under dynamic conditions. Tools employed include cost-volume-profit analysis, budgeting and actual and standard cost systems. PR: ACC 122

ACC246 Auditing (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to auditing for accounting students who have not had experience in auditing. The primary emphasis is on the auditor's decision- making process. Included are concepts in auditing related to determining the nature and amount of evidence the auditor should accumulate, the objectives to be accomplished in a given audit area, the circumstances of the engagement, and the decisions to be made to determine the appropriate evidence to gather and how to evaluate the evidence obtained. Ethical conduct and legal liability of auditors are also covered along with auditing within a computerized environment. PR: ACC 122

ACC248 Governmental Accounting (3-0-3)

This course surveys the theory and practice involved in accounting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. Topics include college, hospital, local government and modified accrual accounting, encumbrances and internal control. PR: ACC 121

ACC250 Accounting Internship (1-8-3)

This course provides the business/accounting student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study and field work within selected business entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience is enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate accounting or accounting related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester. PR: ACC 222, Business or Accounting major, G.P.A. of 2.5, and permission of the department S

ACC295 Internal Auditing (3-0-3)

This introductory internal auditing course examines the fundamental internal audit concepts followed by an illustration of how to conduct internal audit engagements. Topics covered include an examination of governance concepts, risk management, internal control, the procedures used by internal auditors, the assurance engagement, methods used to communicate the results, and procedures for following up. The course examines internal auditing within a computerized environment. PR: ACC 121

ATC101 Flight for Controllers (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to integrate flight and air traffic control sequences. This primary flight training includes dual instruction only in basic flight maneuvers, air traffic control procedures at controlled and uncontrolled airports, introduction to cross country procedures and air traffic control at terminal and enroute facilities. Students are introduced to navigational facilities and procedures including traffic sequencing takeoff and approach at normal and high density airports. PR: FAA Second Class Medical Certificate, proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 103; Lab Fee: $4,500

ATC110 Air Traffic Basics (3-0-3)

This course covers the knowledge areas for a Control Tower Operator Certificate. Subjects covered include: a review of the ATC System and the National Airspace System, aircraft separation minima requirements, fundamentals of radar, introduction to FAA orders and manuals (7110 manual), Letters of Agreement, Search and Rescue Operations, Pilot/Controller Glossary and mandatory phraseology, stripmaking and clearance requirements. Students will be required to complete the FAA Control Tower Operator's Exam in order to continue in subsequent ATC program laboratories. PR: AER 103 and ATC 101 or AER 101 CR: AER 140

ATC200 Ground Control (3-0-3)

This course covers the required knowledge for ground and clearance delivery controllers. Students will learn aircraft recognition features and performance material, airport utilization and console instruments specific to ground control and clearancce delivery. Students will be exposed to and determine best course of action procedures for handling emergency and unusual situations as a function of the ground control position. PR: ATC 110 CR: ATC 205

ATC205 Ground Control Laboratory (0-6-2)

This course is an application of the knowledge information gained in ATC 110 and ATC 200 through a laboratory setting for control of aircraft during ground operations. Students will gain experience through the use of low fidelity training simulation, observation of ground control and clearance delivery operators and hands-on, over-the- shoulder aircraft control. Students will be required to utilize knowledge of the air traffic system, proper terminology and phraseology in all facets of aircraft control during taxi, clearance and ground operations. PR: ATC 110 and FAA Second Class Medical Certificate CR: ATC 200; Lab Fee: $2,000

ATC250 Local Control (3-0-3)

This course covers the required knowledge for local tower controllers. Students will learn VFR and IFR separation rules and apply rules to separating departing and arriving aircraft in visual and instrumental conditions, VFR on-top and special VFR conditions. Students will learn helicopter and special flight operations for numerous aircraft types and configurations. Students will apply weather theory and instrumentation to the various effects on inflight aircraft including LLWSAS, runway condition advisories and hazardous weather advisories. Students will be introduced to primary and secondary radar tower equipment. PR: ATC 200 and ATC 205 CR: ATC 255

ATC255 Local Control Laboratory (0-6-2)

This course is an application of the knowledge gained in ATC 250 through a laboratory setting for control of aircraft during flight operations. Students will gain experience through the use of low fidelity training simulation, observation of flight control operators and hands-on, over- the-shoulder aircraft control. Students will be required to utilize knowledge of the air traffic system, proper terminology and phraseology in all facets of aircraft control during VFR and IFR departure and arrival operations. Upon completion of this laboratory, students will have gained the experience to complete a Control Tower Operator-Facility Rating at the Schenectady County Airport. PR: ATC 200 and ATC 205 CR: ATC 250; Lab Fee: $2,500

ATC260 Enroute Control (2-0-2)

This course is a study of the required knowledge for Enroute Control Operations. Students will be introduced to subject areas involving a career in the FAA as an air traffic controller. Subjects covered include: a review of the ATC System and the National Airspace System, airway facilities, role of the air traffic controller, locations and office facilities. Students will gain insight into entry level positions within the FAA and training at the FAA Academy in Oklahoma City, OK. Students will be exposed to primary and secondary radar control operations including DBRITE radar indicator tower equipment. Students will gain strategies for satisfactorily completing the FAA entrance exam (Air Traffic Selection and Training AT-SAT test). PR: ATC 200 CR: ATC 250

AET110 Introduction to Wind Power Technology (3-0-3)

Topics include wind characteristics, wind energy resources, the yaw orientation system, the mainframe, the tower structure, the supporting foundation, and the control system for the wind turbine. The principle subsystems of the wind turbine will be studied. These include the blades, the supporting hub, the rotating parts such as the shafts, gearbox, coupling, mechanical brake, and the generator. The integration of wind turbines into the power system and wind-energy systems' economics will also be addressed.

AET112 Introduction to Storage Battery Technology (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to storage battery technology. Topics include electrochemistry (oxidation- reduction reactions), simple voltaic cells with aqueous electrolytes, primary or non-rechargeable batteries, and secondary or rechargeable batteries. This course focuses on the Zebra nickel-sodium chloride battery to be manufactured by General Electric in Schenectady, including the chemistry, cell characteristics, and in particular the ceramic electrolyte, electric data, energy density, capacity retention and cycle life of the Zebra battery. PR: CHM 113 or higher

AET114 Introduction to Solar Power Technology (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to solar power technology. Topics include diffuse and intermittent sources of sunlight, the conversion of sunlight into electricity using the physics of the photoelectric effect in photovoltaic cells, the integration of solar power plants into the electrical grid and solar energy systems' economics. This course includes the study of crystalline silicon photovoltaic cells, silicon wafer photovoltaic cells, amorphous thin-film silicon photovoltaic cells, dye-sensitized organic semiconducting solar cells, semiconducting polymer/metal oxide photovoltaic cells, polymer photovoltaic diodes and nano solar cells. PR: CHM 113 or higher

AET116 Introduction to Fuel Cell Technology (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to fuel cell technology. Topics will include the operating features of a fuel cell, the underlying thermodynamics and physical factors that determine their performance, and the integration of the fuel cell itself with other key components such as fuel processing, heat exchange, power conditioning and control systems. Six main types of practical fuel cells will be discussed-the proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC), the alkaline electrolyte fuel cells (AFC), the direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC), the phosphoric acid fuel cells (PAFC), the molten carbonate fuel cells (MCFC), and the solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC). The progress of the development of hydrogen fuel cells and the problems involved in producing and storing hydrogen will also be discussed.

AET118 Lean Manufacturing (1-0-1)

This course will utilize TPS (The Toyota Production System) for implementation of Lean Manufacturing. Using 5S and Standard Work, students will study the importance of establishing visual management to enable the recognition of abnormal conditions (defects), so that they can be addressed and resolved. In addition, students will learn about kaizen (continuous improvement) and a problem solving approach (PDCA) involving all employees with the ultimate goal of supplying the right part, in the right quantity with the right quality, at the right price, and at the right time. Some classes may be held at the Schenectady GE plant.

AET210 Power Generation (3-0-3)

This course examines the generation of electrical energy by renewable energy sources. This course details the principles of operation of the two main classes of generators used extensively in wind power systems: the synchronous generator and the asynchronous or induction generator. The generation of direct current by photovoltaic cells and fuel cells is also discussed. PR: ELT 121

AET272 Power Transmission (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to the methods by which alter- nate generated power is transmitted and distributed to the consumer using the existing power grid. The connection of electrical transformers, wind turbines, and photovoltaic cells to the electrical grid will be discussed. Examples will be taken from systems used by General Electric. PR: AET 210

ASL121 Elementary American Sign Language I (3-0-3)

As the first half of the one-year sequence in elementary American Sign Language (ASL), this course introduces students to the process and structure of the language and provides basic skills necessary to use the language. Students' expressive (signing) and receptive (comprehension) skills are enhanced by an understanding of Deaf Culture. A minimum of five hours of additional ASL practice as prescribed by the instructor is required. The course is designed for beginners.

ASL122 Elementary American Sign Language II (3-0-3)

As the second half of the one-year sequence in Elementary American Sign Language (ASL), this course continues the study of the processes and basic structures of ASL to provide higher level skills to use the language more fluently. Students' expressive (signing) and receptive (comprehension) skills are enhanced by a deeper understanding of Deaf Culture. A minimum of five hours of additional ASL practice as prescribed by the instructor is required. PR: ASL 121

ANT121 Cultural Anthropology (3-0-3)

This course explores kinship, marriage, family, political, religious and economic organization in cross- cultural perspective. The concentration is on historical development, theoretical perspectives, basic concepts and methodology of cultural anthropology with an emphasis on non-Western societies.

ART127 Introduction to Watercolors (2-2-3)

This foundational painting course includes segments of both lecture-demonstration and laboratory. Lectures include topics on the history of watercolors and its relationship to the history of art. Sessions facilitate the student's exploration of fundamentals such as observation, composition, color theory, the basic techniques in watercolor, as well as working from still life, landscape, the figure, and music. The course demonstrates and incorporates design fundamentals, and personal expression is strongly encouraged.

ART128 Introduction to Drawing (2-2-3)

This course includes segments of lecture, demonstration, and laboratory. It includes lectures on the history of drawing and its relationship to the history of art. It facilitates student development of basic drawing techniques through the exploration of fundamentals such as observation, composition, color theory, perspective, as well as working from still life, landscape, the figure, and music. The course incorporates the demonstration of design fundamentals on a weekly basis. It strongly encourages personal expression.

ART129 Two-Dimensional Design (2-2-3)

This foundation course introduces students to the basic theory and practice of two-dimentional design. It emphasizes an understanding of two-dimentional design concepts and explores the elements and value of concept, image, expression, visual problem solving, and studio practice. PR: ART 127 or 128 or evidence of studio art in high school

ART133 Appreciation of Art-Painting (3-0-3)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the history of the visual arts and to help them develop an understanding and appreciation of artistic creativity. Various examples of painting, print-making, and drawing from Western other cultures such as African, South American, and Indo-Chinese will be analyzed in order to promote an awareness of different approaches to these media, forms, and content. No background in art or formal art history is necessary.

ART135 Appreciation of Art-Sculpture and Architecture (3-0-3)

This course is designed to acquaint students with the spatial arts of sculpture and architecture and to develop in them an appreciation of artistic creativity as it applies to these art forms. An examination will be conducted of cross-cultural influences among architectural styles such as Moorish on early Renaissance, Greek on Roman, etc. Sculpture is analyzed as an independent art form in order to help the student develop an awareness of the variety of media, form, content, and style. No background in art or formal art history is necessary.

ART199 Art Indep Study (6-0-6)



AST123 Exploring Space (3-0-3)

This course examines present and future methods of space exploration. Topics include the basic science, instruments, technology, dangers, benefits, costs, and practical and political importance of space exploration. Discussion topics include space stations, moon colonies, manned missions from Mercury through Apollo, and current international space missions. PR: Two years of high school mathematics OR MAT 128

AST125 Solar System (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the modern exploration of the solor system. Topics include the evolution and characteristics of the major planets, moons, and numerous minor planets of the solar system, solar and lunar eclipses, seasons, lunar phases and astronomical folklore. PR: Two years of high school mathematics OR MAT 128 F

AST127 Cosmic System (3-0-3)

This one-semester course introduces students to the scientific study of the cosmic system. Emphasis is placed on the evolution, life cycle and characteristics of the stars and galaxies. Information from recent discoveries by the Hubble telescope and other 21st century NT telescopes is presented. Other discussion topics include constellation identification, space travel, life in the universe, and cosmology. PR: Two years of high school mathematics OR MAT 128 S

AER101 Introduction to Flight Labratory (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to acquire a Private Pilot's license, Aircraft, SEL certificate. The primary flight training includes dual and solo flight time to meet the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) practical testing standards in such training as basic flight maneuvers, takeoff and landing, night flying and cross-country procedures. Minimum FAA flight training hours apply and students will, in most cases, exceed those minimum hours in order to meet practical test standards. Completion of the FAA knowledge exam is required for this certificate. PR: FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate Recommended, Homeland Security Administration Background Requirements. Students must be eligible for ENG 123 and 100-level Math course. PR/CR: AER 103

AER102 Aviation History (3-0-3)

This course provides a general description of the entire field of aviation starting with the early achievements of flight and progressing through the various milestones to the present age. This course contains an overview of the governmental involvement with the aviation industry from establishing the postal routes, safety regulation, airline subsidies, through deregulation of the airline industry. This course includes the contributions to aviation by women, minorities and other cultures. The introduction and development of power flight, from Zeppelins, Flying Boats, through the Boeing 777, and the X-30 Oriental Express and beyond is also explored. An extended field trip will be made to either the Curtis Air Museum in Hammondsport, N.Y. or the Rhinebeck Aerodrome, Rhinebeck, N.Y., to see aircraft from the early years of flight. F

AER103 Introduction to Flight (4-0-4)

This course provides a stuent with the fundamental concepts necessary to successfully complete the FAA Private Pilot Knowledge Exam. Subject areas included in this course are: theory of flight, basic aerodynamics principles, single-engine land airplane, operation/systems/performance, navigation, flight computer computations, communications, publications, regulations and basic emergency procedures. PR: Students must be eligible to enroll in ENG 123 and a 100-level Math course

AER140 Elements of Instrument (4-0-4)

This course is a study of the instrument flying techniques and procedures in conjunction with modern, ILS, VOR, ADF, GPS and radar facilities. The course includes the study of basic attitude instrument flying, instrument navigation procedures, holding, precision and non- precision approach and departure procedures and macro- and micro-meteorology analysis. Students are provided with the information necessary to complete the FAA Instrument Rating Knowledge Exam. PR: AER 103 or equivalent

AER141 Elements of Instrument Lab (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single-engine aircraft and an approved flight training device to acquire an Instrument Rating, Aircraft, SEL. The primary instrument flight training includes dual flight time to meet the FAA practical testing standards in such training as attitude instrument flying, departure, en route and approach procedures in the instrument flight environment, instrument night flying, and cross-country procedures. Minimum FAA flight training hours apply and students will, in most cases, exceed those minimum hours in order to meet practical test standards. Completion of the FAA knowledge exam is required for this certificate. PR: AER 101 and 103 or equivalent Private Pilot Certificate, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended); proof of US citizenship or of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 140 Lab Fee: $8,200.00

AER150 Airport Management and Security (3-0-3)

This course familiarizes students with the fundamental components of a typical commercial airport and its multi-level security requirements. In addition to a commercial airport's various support functions, the organizational structure, governing FAA regulations, inter-agency relationships and management challenges are examined. Security issues are presented in a post 9/11 environment to include scenario-based discussions and problem-solving situations.

AER199 AER Independent Study (3-0-3)



AER200 Commercial Operations (3-0-3)

This course is a study of the required knowledge for a Commercial Pilot's license. Subjects covered in this course include: advanced aerodynamics, advanced aircraft systems, physiology, emergency procedures and planning, flight safety, and aeronautical decision making. There is a focus on crew resource management and flight safety operations to include Part 91 and Part 135 regulations and operations. Students will receive an instructor endorsement for the Commercial Pilot Knowledge Exam at the completion of the course requirements for an airplane-SEL. PR: AER 103 or equivalent

AER210 Aviation Law (3-0-3)

This course covers the history of aviation law, federal regulation of air transportation with special attention to ecological aspects of aircraft noise and pollutants and the role of state and federal government in aviation law, including functions of the Federal Aviation Administration and the Terminal Security Administration. PR: AER 103 or permission of the department

AER214 Physiology of Flight (3-0-3)

In this course students will study the physical effects of flight on the human body including a discussion of the following: cockpit resource management, effects of high altitude flight, G-forces, alcohol and drugs, including OTC and illicit, "IMSAFE" requirement of every pilot for the safety of themselves as well as other persons, passengers and property, and FAR Part 37 Medical disqualifications. PR: AER 103 or permission of the department

AER228 Commercial Operations Lab I (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with the practical fight experience in a single engine aircraft toward the FAA cross-country requirement to obtain a Commercial Pilot Certificate. This course alone will not complete all requirements for the commercial certificate. Students will gain flight experience in day and night cross-country both dual and solo. Students will be introduced to the crew resource management concept, function and practical use of standard operating procedures, minimum equipment lists and commercial flight operations (Part 135 and Part 121) scenarios. PR: AER 140 and AER 141 or equivalent, Private Pilot with an Instrument Rating, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. CR: AER 200 or equivalent Lab Fee : $6,700

AER229 Commercial Operations Lab II (0-3-1)

This course provides a student with continued practical experience in crew resource management as it applies to complex and high performance aircraft. Continued use of effective communication skills are formulated and evaluated throughout this course. Students are introduced to the function and operation of advanced aircraft systems, practical experience in accelerated stalls and advanced maneuvers in order to apply aerodynamic theory. Students are trained on advanced aircraft systems including constant speed propellers and retractable landing gear, the associated emergency procedures for these systems and planning for commercial flight situations. Students completing this course in conjunction with AER 228 will receive the practical flight experience requirements necessary to complete the FAA Commercial Practical Exam and receive a Commercial Pilot Certificate, Airplane, SEL. PR: AER 200 and AER 228, FAA Second Class Medical Certificate (required), FAA First Class Medical Certificate (recommended), proof of US citizenship or completion of the US Office of Homeland Security, Terminal Security Administration background check requirements. Lab Fee: $7,200

AER232 Basic Instruction (3-0-3)

This course covers the techniques of basic flight instruction in order to become an FAA Certified Flight Instructor. Subjects covered include the fundamentals of flight instruction to prepare the student for the FAA Knowledge Exam on the Fundamentals of Instruction (FOI). Additionally, this course will analyze basic and advanced flight maneuvers, mechanics and regulations so as to prepare the student for the oral and written FAA Flight Instructor-Airplane exams. PR: AER 200

AER233 Basic Instruction Lab (0-1-1)

This course provides a student with the practical flight experience in a single engine aircraft to acquire an FAA Flight Instructor Certificate-Airplane, single engine land. Students will acquire instructional knowledge of the elements of all flight maneuvers and procedures necessary for private and commercial pilot certification. Analysis of the required maneuvers includes the recognition and correction of common student errors. PR: AER 200, AER 228, AER 229 or equivalent, Commercial Pilot Certificate-Airplane, single engine land, FAA Second Class Medical Lab Fee: $3,500

AER236 Flight Safety (3-0-3)

This course introduces practical safety material, organizations and equipment necessary to conduct safe daily flight operations. All factors including weather, maintenance, equipment and human factors will be examined, with particular emphasis on critical decision making under stress conditions. Proper decision making will be based on knowledge of formal weather briefing techniques, flight plan filing, search and rescue methods, post-crash survival, aircraft maintenance programs, accident/incident reports and forms, airport rescue and firefighting, the role of the NTSB and flight safety organizations, and modern hardware (Doppler radar, HSOS, LLWSAS, TCAS, GPWS). PR: AER 103 or permission of the department

BIO110 The Human Body (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to general principles of biology through the study of the human body. Two-thirds of the course covers basic topics in scientific inquiry, chemistry, structure and function of cells and cellular processes, and one-third of the course covers topics in selected human organ systems. This course is intended for non-science majors requiring a non-lab science. PR: MAT 128

BIO111 Fundamentals of Biology (3-2-4)

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of biology with emphasis on humans. It will examine both the internal systems of humans and the relationship of humans as organisms to the physical and biotic environment. This course is designed for students in services related fields. This course does not satisfy any requirement for the Math/Science, Computer Science, or Science degrees. PR: Two years of high school science F, S

BIO112 Human Biology (3-2-4)

This course is an introduction to general principles of biology through the study of the human body. Two-thirds of the course covers basic topics in scientific inquiry, chemistry, structure and function of cells and cellular processes, and one-third of the course covers topics in selected human organ systems. The laboratory portion of the course complements lecture topics and includes dissection. PR: High School level Science or GED level science

BIO115 Current Topics in Biology (3-0-3)

This is a one-semester course which will address some of the major problems and issues in biology. Cell structure and function, the nutritional needs of cells and organisms, the universal nature of the genetic code which allows genetic engineering, the effects of pollutants and the basic concepts of ecology are among the topics which will be covered. An appreciation of the scientific method and the types of questions science can answer will be fostered.

BIO141 Biology I (3-3-4)

This first semester of a one-year course explores in depth the principles of modern biology. The development of molecular biology and its techniques will be examined, along with its impact on modern concepts of cell structure and physiology, cell reproduction, energy transfer. Genetics, including the structure and role of DNA, is examined. Changes in DNA over time, that is, evolution and adaptation, are discussed. The laboratory portion of the course consists of topics correlating with lecture and designed to lead the student into independent and/or team research and thought. There is a semester-long research project on Mendelian Genetics. PR: Three years of high school math, high school biology and chemistry (taken within the past three years) or BIO 111 or BIO 112 and CHM 113 (taken within the past two years). F

BIO142 Biology II (3-3-4)

This second semester of a one-year course explores in depth the principles of molecular, cellular, and organismal biology. Topics include the molecular basis of inheritance, evolution, population genetics, six-kingdom analysis, and the systems of the human body. The laboratory portion is designed in three parts. Part one consists of learning techniques in molecular biology. Part two involves learning characteristics of the six-kingdom system and the dissection of the fetal pig for different body systems. Part three consists of conducting a laboratory research project with a formal presentation of the results. PR: BIO 141 S

BIO149 Introduction to Biotechnology (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to biotechnology and its application in a variety of medical and scientific disciplines. Topics include the fundamental scientific principles and methods involved in recombinant DNA research and protein biotechnologies. This course also explores ethical and regulatory concerns raised with new advances in biotechnology and discusses career opportunities in the field. PR: BIO 141, MAT 118 or 148

BIO150 Intro to Biotechnology Lab (0-3-2)

This laboratory covers basic protocols and techniques essential to work as a technician in pharmaceutical, biotechnology, and related industries. Labs include basic procedures, instrumentation, solution chemistry, and performing assays. Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), Good Laboratory Practice (GLP), and Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) are covered. PR/CR: BIO 149

BIO151 Anatomy and Physiology I (3-3-4)

This is the first course of a lecture-laboratory sequence for the students of the allied health fields. The lecture topics include anatomical medical terminology, cell structure, tissues, the skin, skeletal system, muscular system and nervous system. The laboratory topics include cells, tissues, and an examination of the anatomy and physiology of the integumentary, skeletal, muscular and nervous systems. Emphasis is placed on both gross and microscopic work. PR: BIO 112 or BIO 141 (taken within the past three years) and CHM 113 or CHM 121 (taken within the past three years)

BIO152 Anatomy and Physiology II (3-3-4)

This is the second course of a lecture-laboratory sequence designed for the students of the allied health fields. The lecture topics include the cardiovascular, respiratory, endocrine, digestive, immune, lymphatic, urinary, and reproductive systems, and in addition, metabolism, and fluid and electrolyte balance. The laboratory work covers the anatomy and physiology of the endocrine, circulatory, respiratory, digestive, urinary and reproductive systems. Emphasis is placed on both gross and microscopic work. PR: BIO 151

BIO154 Introduction to Pharmacology (3-0-3)

This course is a survey of the fundamentals of pharmacology and is designed for students in nursing or other health related fields. It will examine the basic understanding of drug actions, drug absorption, bioavailability, distribution, metabolism and excretion; the administration of therapeutic drugs; drugs that affect the nervous, cardiovascular, and renal systems; drugs with actions on smooth muscle; endocrine drugs; chemotherapeutic drugs; antimicrobials; cancer chemotherapy; immunopharmacology; special aspects of pediatric, geriatric, dermatologic and gastrointestinal pharmacology. PR: BIO 151 and 152 and high school chemistry or CHM 113 or equivalent; higher level of chemistry preferred. S

BIO203 General Ecology (3-3-4)

Through lecture and laboratory experiences, this course focuses on the study of major ecological principles including: population and community biology, competition and predation, physiological ecology and adaptations, ecosystems, nutrient cycles, energy flow, and ecological succession. The ecological basis of contemporary environmental problems is examined and related to human activities. Quantitative perspectives and analysis will be used throughout. Portions of the laboratory experience will occur outside the indoor laboratory space. External laboratory exercises will take place on campus property or immediately adjacent spaces, or may involve field trips. PR: BIO 142 and CHM 121

BIO241 Microbiology (3-3-4)

This is a course in the fundamental principles of the biology of microorganisms. The topics include the morphology, physiology, and disease production capacity of microorganisms, protective mechanisms of hosts, control of microorganisms, genetic engineering and biotechnology, industrial microbiology, and microbial ecology. PR: BIO 141 or 151 or permission of the department F, S

BIO250 Biotechnology Internship (1-8-3)

This course provides direct hands-on field experience in biotechnology, medical or research laboratories. Weekly progress reports are required. A minimum of 96 hours of internship-related activities is required at the placement site. PR: BIO 150 and minimum gpa 2.5

BIO261 Cell & Molecular Biology (3-3-4)

This course covers the principles of cell and molecular biology, including structure, function, and molecular relationships amongst the components of the cell. Major topics include macromolecules, organelles, biological membranes, cell metabolism, growth and replication, energy transformation, extracellular matrix, signal transduction, organization of the genome and regulation of gene expression. PR: BIO 142 (Biology II) and CHM 121 (General Chemistry I)

BIO262 Genetics (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the aspects of modern genetics. Topics include gene structure and function, Mendelian and non-Mendelian genetics, gene expression, population genetics, recombinant DNA technology, and genome analysis with emphasis on human aspects and applications. PR: BIO 141 and CHM 121

BIO263 Biotechnology Techniques (0-6-3)

This course uses the laboratory setting to explore experimental and analytical techniques used in cell biology, molecular genetics and biotechnology to gain an understanding of cell and molecular processes. The course covers biotechnology laboratory skills applicable to research and industrial settings. PR: BIO 261 (Cell & Molecular Biology)

BRG100 Bridge Math Skills (0-0-0)



BRG101 Bridge English Skills (0-0-0)



BUS106 Business of the Capital Region (3-0-3)

This course provides students with an overview of business and economic activity in the Capital Region of New York State. Topics include an overview of the Capital Region's economic history, geography, infrastructure, and recent business developments. Sources of information and analytical tools are introduced in the course for review of major business sectors in the Capital Region.

BUS113 Business Mathematics (3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the concepts of mathematics as they apply to a wide-range of personal and commercial business problems. The topics covered include how to dissect and solve word problems; fractions, decimals; banking; percents and their applications; trade and cash discounts; payroll; simple interest; compound interest and present value; installment buying; depreciation; and inventory and overhead. PR: CSS 120 or MAT 126 F,S

BUS115 Basic Keyboarding (1-0-1)

The student will learn to key the alphabetic keys using the "touch method." The student will learn the reaches to the numeric and symbol keys as well as basic formatting, proofreading, and editing techniques. The student will develop keyboarding speed and accuracy. A minimum of 20 net wpm is required. This course is offered in a time period shorter than a full semester. Additional laboratory hours are required. F, S

BUS118 Document Formatting (3-0-3)

This course uses the "touch method" in teaching the alphabetic and numeric keys. Emphasis is on formatting, proofreading, and editing techniques using Microsoft Word. Topics include letters, memoranda, reports, and tables. Standard English composition skills are covered in the production of documents.

BUS121 Business Law I (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the nature and sources of law pertaining to contracts, sales, secured transactions, bankruptcy and insurance. F, S

BUS123 Business Law II (3-0-3)

This course continues the study of law begun in Business Law I, and covers the subjects of personal and real property, bailments, agency, employment, partnerships, corporations, limited liability companies, estates and trusts. PR: BUS 121 F,S

BUS135 Advanced Document Formatting (3-0-3)

This course provides advanced document formatting using the functions of Microsoft Word. Word processing commands are applied on a variety of documents such as letters with mail merge, tables, and reports. The student will also be introduced to legal forms, graphic enhancements and meeting management. Proofreading, composition and other language arts skills are integrated and reinforced. PR: BUS 118

BUS212 Business Communications (3-0-3)

This course provides students with principles of effective communication in business, both written and oral. It focuses attention on the communication process including effective listening, writing and speaking. Topics include analysis of business letters, reports, and memos for organization of ideas, conciseness and clarity. The course also requires writing business letters, memos and messages for electronic media, writing business reports, and an oral presentation. Writing resumes and applying and interviewing for employment are also covered in this course. PR: ENG 123 (may be taken concurrently) F,S

BUS214 Disney Corp Bus Communic'ns (3-0-3)

The Disney Corporation Communication course describes how American companies communicate with key audiences, both internal and external to the corporation. Course introduces students to the communication function and how companies reach a variety of publics including customers, investors, employees, media, government agencies, and communities located in the proximity of the corporation. PR: ENG 123 (may be taken concurrently)

BUS223 Business Statistics (3-0-3)

This course provides the student with the knowledge to gather, process and present statistical data, construct frequency charts, compute measures of central tendency and standard and quartile deviations. This latter knowledge is then applied to solving business problems in sampling, hypothesis testing, regression and correlation, and trend analysis. PR: MAT 128 F,S

BUS250 Business Co-Op 1 (3-0-3)

Cooperative education is a learning experience which integrates the student's academic field of study with work experience in business and industry. Co-op students receive college credit for structured, on-the-job learning experiences related to their academic field and completion of an orientation. Students work 240 hours at the workplace during a 15 week period. PR: 2.5 GPA and Permission by Division

BUS251 Business Co-Op 2 (3-0-3)

This course is a continuation of the cooperation education experience. Cooperative education is a learning experience which integrates the student's academic field of study with work experience in business and industry. Co-op students receive college credit for structured, on-the-job learning experiences related to their academic field and completion of an orientation. Students work 240 hours at the workplace during a 15 week period. PR: 2.5 GPA and Permission of Division, BUS 250

BUS252 Business Plan Development (3-0-3)

This course provides aspiring entrepreneurs personalized guidance from successful business owners and advisors on the critical knowledge and skills necessary to start and grow a business. Topics include establishing a vision and mission statement, financing, legal issues, market research, diversity in the workplace, business etiquette, branding, human resources, payroll, social media, and customer service. A mandatory business plan will be developed and presented to a panel of judges. PR: MGT 242

CGM101 Intro to the Gaming Industry (3-0-3)

This course provides an overview of the historical background of gaming, including Native American gaming, and the progression of the casino from its early origin to today's modern casinos. It focuses on the various segments of the casino industry including the organizational structure of a casino. This course explores Class II and III licenses and the role that differing state and federal laws and regulations play in the operation of gaming establishments, hotels, and resort destinations.

CGM102 Casino Gaming Operations (3-0-3)

This course presents an overview of the various games offered at a standard casino. It provides an analysis of the organizational structure of the games department, the various games offered and the importance of each game as related to overall gaming operations in a casino. Topics covered include table games, slot management, internet gaming, sports book operations, keno, and race operations. Also covered are cage operations, casino accounting, and terminology used in the industry.

CGM103 Gaming Reg Laws & Regulations (3-0-3)

This course examines the differing state and federal laws and regulations related to the gaming industry and the role these laws and regulations play in the operations of casinos, hotels, and resort destinations. The application of these state and federal laws and regulations to Native American tribal operations is studied. The course covers information on the development and implementation of a system of internal controls, policies and procedures that will ensure compliance with these laws. A review of the social, political and environmental impacts of gaming on local, regional, and national jurisdictions, as well as licensing requirements and processes for management, employees and vendors, is included.

CGM104 Non-Casino Gaming Operations (3-0-3)

This course covers hotel operations within a casino environment, the information systems that drive the organization and ancillary departments to include retail, transportation, entertainment and property operations. It presents an examination of the management and operation of the human resource function, the role of the food and beverage division within the context of a casino operation, and the role of the marketing and guest services department as it influences the casino environment. Each department will be studied in relationship to its structure, planning process, daily operations, budgetary impacts, and management challenges.

CGM105 Casino Security & Surveillance (3-0-3)

This course acquaints students with the various types of security measures used in the casino industry to help protect the casino from loss and maintain the integrity of the games. Topics include the most commonly used scams and cheating methods for each game. The course also covers camera operations, security surveillance, internal theft and fraud, and investigations.

CGM250 Internship (3-0-3)

This course provides students with the opportunity for concentrated study, observation and work in the area of individual interest in the field of Casino and Gaming Management. An instructor-approved internship is required. This practical experience will better prepare students to nter a career in Casino and Gaming Management. PR: CGM 101 and CGM 102

CHM113 Fundamentals of Chemistry (3-3-4)

This course covers the fundamentals of chemistry in one semester. Topics include dimensional analysis, Modern Atomic Theory, chemical bonding, classification of chemical reactions, stoichiometry, solution chemistry, and the gas laws. The laboratory covers techniques and illustrates the chemical principles covered in the course. This course cannot be used toward the Mathematics/Science, Science, or Computer Science degrees. PR: MAT 128 or equivalent F, S

CHM115 Consumer Chemistry (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to atoms and molecules and applies this to chemistry involved in our everyday lives, such as the chemistry food, household cleaners, personal care products, energy, and materials. The impact of chemistry in our environment will be considered throughout the course.

CHM121 General Chemistry I (3-3-4)

This course is the first semester of a two-semester sequence. Topics include Modern Atomic Theory, chemical bonding, classification of chemical reactions, stoichemistry, solution chemistry, the gas laws, and enthalpy. The laboratory experiments emphasize techniques, laboratory notebook keeping and illustrate the concepts studied in lecture. PR: High school algebra with trigonometry and high school regents chemistry or CHM 113 within the last five years F, S

CHM122 General Chemistry II (3-3-4)

This course is the second semester of a two-semester sequence. Topics include intermolecular forces, kinetics, equilibrium, acids and bases and their reactions, buffers, solubility and precipitation reactions, thermodynamics and electrochemistry. Selected topics may include nuclear chemistry, an introduction to organic chemistry, and transitional metal chemistry. The laboratory experiments emphasize techniques, laboratory notebook keeping and illustrate the concepts studied in lecture. PR: CHM 121 or equivalent and MAT 129 or higher F, S

CHM200 Introduction to Organic and Biochemistry (3-3-4)

This course provides an introduction to the major classes of organic compounds followed by an introduction to biochemistry including a study of the structure and function of the four major macromolecules in biochemistry: carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes, and nucleic acids. Other molecules such as hormones and vitamins, which are important to the cellular and molecular processes, will also be studied. PR: CHM 122 or equivalent

CHM228 Organic Chemistry I (4-3-5)

This course is the first course of a two-semester course in organic chemistry. The first semester includes the study of structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, preparation, and reactions and reaction mechanisms of alkanes, alkenes, alkynes, cyclic hydrocarbons, alkyl halides, ethers, epoxides, alcohols, and aromatic compounds. The laboratory stresses techniques, organic synthesis and the use of instruments for analysis. PR: CHM 122 or equivalent

CHM229 Organic Chemistry II (4-3-5)

This course is the second course of a two-semester course in organic chemistry. The second semester includes the study of structure, stereochemistry, nomenclature, preparation, reactions and reaction mechanisms of free radicals, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, B-dicarbonyl compounds, aldehydes, ketones, and amines. Special topics may include bioorganic compounds, synthetic polymers, or pericyclic reactions. The laboratory stresses techniques, organic synthesis, and the use of instruments for analysis. PR: CHM 228 or equivalent

CSS095 College Writing Workshop (2-0-2)

This course provides students with additional academic instruction and learning strategies to successfully achieve ENG 123 College Composition student learning outcomes. It individualizes grammar instruction through the interactive web based material, and assignments are directly aligned with those in ENG 123. Additionally, the course instructs students in portfolio development and review as a tool to enhance the writing process. This course is developmental in nature and the two-credit equivalents do not satsify degree or certificate program requirements. CR: ENG 123

CSS106 Mathematics Skills (3-0-3)

This course is a review of basic arithmetic operations with an algebraic approach (including whole numbers, fractions, decimals, percents, and ratios). It provides preparation/review for Intro to Algebra, Business Math, Math for Food Service Records, and Concepts in Mathematics. F,S

CSS116 Skills for College Success (1-0-1)

This one-credit course is designed to provide a brief but intensive review of study skills for success in college. The following skills are covered: setting goals, time management, remembering and reproducing what you learn, textbook reading, note taking, and stress management. F,S

CSS119 ESL for Academic Writing (3-0-3)

This course is targeted for the academically and linguistically diverse population of SCCC students or prospective students whose first language is not English. The multilevel approach will focus on the common areas of difficulty in second language writing and reading. Its main goal is to enable students to engage in academic work with skills commensurate with those of native speakers.

CSS120 Introduction to Algebra (3-0-3)

This course focuses on algebraic operations and properties within the real number system, including integers, rational and irrational numbers. Algebra is introduced to evaluate formulas, solve first degree equations in one variable, perform operations on polynomials, graph lines, and calculate basic geometric formulas. This course provides preparation and review for Algebra I. PR: CSS 106 or equivalent F,S

CSS122 Reading Skills I (3-0-3)

This course is intended to equip students with the skills and strategies to expand vocabulary and comprehend reading material beyond literal meaning. Students study vocabulary weekly using context clues, association, and visualization techniques. Students develop skills in finding main idea, details, and inference by reading a variety of literature and expository materials. Students develop critical thinking skills by analyzing, comparing, and contrasting texts, often in writing. Study skills taught include textbook study strategies and note-taking. F, S

CSS123 Reading Skills II (3-0-3)

This course provides an opportunity to learn and practice reading comprehension skills that go beyond CSS 122. The course continues vocabulary development, higher level comprehension skills, critical reading and thinking, reading textbooks, reading short fiction, and writing as related to reading. Study Skills taught include active reading strategies. PR: CSS 122 or recommendation based on placement test F,S

CSS124 Writing Skills I (3-0-3)

This course provides instruction and practice in the fundamentals of writing including grammar, punctuation, sentence structure, and organization. The student moves from paragraph to essay development using the process approach to writing. Unless otherwise indicated in the semester course schedule, this course is taught using computers in an electronic classroom. F,S

CSS125 Writing Skills II (3-0-3)

This course provides an opportunity to learn and practice written communication skills beyond CSS 124. Development of a thesis, introduction, and conclusion is taught, as is the use of transitions and organizational patterns for coherence. Practice in grammar and mechanics is provided. PR: CSS 124 or recommendation based on placement test F,S * These courses are developmental in nature and the three credit equivalents do not satisfy degree or certificate program requirements.

CSS126 Integrated Reading & Writing I (3-0-3)

The course introduces students to active reading strategies and integrates selected readings with writing assignments that focus on sentence and paragraph structure. It also emphasizes the application of appropriate grammar and mechanics.

CSS127 Integrated Reading and Writing Skills II (3-0-3)

This course provides students with the foundation needed for college level reading and writing. It introduces students to reading strategies for a range of texts. Writing assignments are centered on student analysis of these texts. Special emphasis is given to paragraph organization and essay development along with grammar and mechanics. PR: CSS 122 and/or CSS 124 or recommendation based on placement test

COM100 Intro to Human Communication (3-0-3)

This course introduces theories of human communication, including the fundamental skills needed for effective communication across a variety of contexts, such as relational, group, organizational, public, and intercultural communication situations. This course also explores the impact of digital media and the online world on patterns of human communication.

COM105 Public Speaking (3-0-3)

This course introduces the essential steps in preparing and presenting speeches by applying basic communication principles and public-speaking strategies to a variety of speaking assignments.

COM121 Mass Media (3-0-3)

This course focuses on how mass media function and impact United States culture. From both a historical and contemporary point of view, it explains the evolution of the eight areas of mass media: books, magazines, newspapers, recordings, radio, movies, television, and new media. It also explores the technological, economic, political and cultural aspects of the media. Communication and mass media theories are examined in tandem with an analysis of the key issues in the field. PR or CR: ENG 123

COM200 Introductoin to Media Writing (3-0-3)

This course explores the differing writing styles and formats used in a variety of media environments, including print, broadcast, and Web. This course emphasizes gathering relevant and accurate information and writing for specific audiences. Additional topics include writing advertising copy, writing for public relations, and the ethical and legal implications of writing for the media. PR: ENG 123 College Composition or equivalent

COM231 New Media and Society (3-0-3)

This course explores the development of the Internet and such social media as blogs, texts, YouTube, Wikipedia, and online games and examines the impact of this digital revolution on society, politics, and the economy. It also examines the convergence of ld and new media, the digital generation, and the impact of mega-search engines, such as Google and Yahoo. CR: ENG 123

COM235 Intro to Visual Communication (3-0-3)

This course analyzes the production and consumption of visual messages, particularly those found in the media, and their impact on human communication. It combines theory and practice to explain how the human mind both processes and creates meaning from visual phenomena. This course examines the history of visual communication, principles of design and color theory, typography, the technology behind both print and electronic media, and technology's influence on design. The course also explores the idea that images combined with text are powerful ways to inform, educate, and persuade individuals. PR: COM 121 Mass Media or COM 231 New Media and Society

COM265 Communication Internship (9-135-3)

This course provides students the opportunity to explore and gain experience in a career area related to communications in a supervised professional setting. The internship enables students to blend theory, technology, and professional values, while exploring future career paths. The course requires students to complete 45 hours per credit of fieldwork. Grading is on a pass/fail basis. PR: COM 121 Mass Media or COM 231 New Media and Society

CIS102 Computing Basics (1-0-1)

This introductory course provides the student with the computer basics necessary for working with software applications in a personal computer object-oriented environment. Topics include the basics of computer input/output devices, finding and using virtual help sources and file management. Students will be required to make use of personal computers to complete projects.

CIS110 Workstation Architecture and Support I (A+) (3-0-3)

This is part one of a two-part, hands-on, lab-oriented course covering the foundations of PC configuration and support. Topics include installation of different versions of the Windows operating system, building, upgrading, repairing, configuring, troubleshooting, optimizing, diagnosing and the preventive maintenance of PC's. Students learn how to build a computer and install different versions of the Windows operating system.

CIS111 Workstation Architecture and Support II (A+) (3-0-3)

This is part two of a two-part, hands-on, lab-oriented course. Part two of this course introduces local area networks and servers, preventive maintenance techniques, and specific strategies for troubleshooting hardware and software. PR: CIS 110

CIS121 Introduction to Computers (3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to fundamental concepts of computers and computing including number systems, hardware, architecture, information processing, operating systems, networks (including the Internet) and web design. Additionally, students will complete significant projects utilizing contemporary word processing, spreadsheet, and presentation graphics software. Fundamentals of programming will be explored using modern programming languages. Other software applications may be examined during the semester. PR: BUS 115 or equivalent

CIS129 Programming Fundamentals (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to computer programming using a modern, object- oriented programming language. It is intended to be a beginning programming course focusing on programming concepts and fundamentals. PR: MAT 128 or higher F,S

CIS133 Programming in Java (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to object-oriented programming using the Java programming language, with a focus on developing high quality, functional solutions to problems. Topics include data types, input/output, control structures, GUI interfaces, methods, classes, inheritance, and polymorphism. Students will use computer facilities to complete programming assignments. PR: CIS 129 F,S

CIS134 C++/UNIX (4-0-4)

Students are introduced to commonly used algorithms. Students employ object-oriented design and object- oriented principles in problem solving using the C++ programming language. Students are introduced to the UNIX operating system and shell scripting. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 129 or equivalent

CIS136 Introduction to Web Development (3-0-3)

This course provides the student with the essential concepts and process of web page development, starting with Extensible Hypertext Markup Language (XHTML) coding and building to more complex layouts using cascading style sheets (CSS). The course will emphasize a disciplined approach to software design and coding. Attention will be directed toward the impact of a designer's choices on communication, understanding and accessibility. Upon completion, all students will develop an original, dynamic, multi-paged website suitable for publishing on the WWW. CR: CIS 102 or adequate proficiency in basic computing skills

CIS140 Introduction to Computer Aided Drafting (3-0-3)

This course teaches the basics of computer aided drafting as applied to engineering drawings using the AutoCAD drafting package. Topics include: fundamentals of computer aided drafting, drafting equipment, orthographic representations, special views, applied geometry and drawing conventions, basic dimensioning, section views, thread representation, detail and assembly drawings, auxiliary views, isometric and other pictorial drawings, geometric dimensioning and tolerancing. The student will then learn the fundamentals of 3-D solids and sheet designs using the Autodesk Inventor package.

CIS221 Advanced Computer Applications (3-0-3)

This course provides students with the opportunity to increase their knowledge of several components of the Microsoft Office suite of software applications. Upon completion of this course, students will be prepared to test as certified Microsoft Office User Specialists. PR: CIS 121 or equivalent

CIS223 Database Management (3-0-3)

This course will give the student a basic overview of Relational Database Design. The student will acquire advanced knowledge of Microsoft Access and the ISO standard SQL language. Students will work individually on one large project encompassing all phases of database design and implementation. PR: CIS 129 and adequate proficiency in Microsoft Access S

CIS225 Operating Systems (3-0-3)

This course will introduce students to Operating System theory and application. Operating System's concepts and components will be explored in both the UNIX (Linux) and Windows environments.Topics include: process management, communication and synchronization, memory management, device management, file systems, system administration and security. PR: CIS 129

CIS229 Systems Analysis and Design (3-0-3)

This course places an emphasis on a disciplined approach to software development using the application of software engineering principles. Students are provided with a systematic introduction to software development. The course introduces the student to the Software Development Life Cycle (SDLC), including a general overview of a typical business-oriented software system, the analysis of the system, an approach to the design of the system, and a plan for system testing and future maintenance. Students work collaboratively on a computer information systems project encompassing all phases of the SDLC. PR: CIS 223

CIS236 Advanced Web Design (3-0-3)

This course provides a practical introduction to JavaScript and the design of dynamic web pages. The student will enhance the functionality and interactivity of web pages by learning to create and utilize embedded and external JavaScript source code. PR: CIS 129 and CIS 136

CIS237 Advanced Web Programming (3-0-3)

This course is for the student who wants to learn advanced web site programming techniques using contemporary development tools and languages. Concepts relating to server-side programming are explored. PR: CIS 129 and CIS 136

CIS238 XML (3-0-3)

This course focuses on XML (eXtendable Markup Language) and the supporting technologies of XML used in person-to- computer and computer-to-computer communications. Some of the technologies covered will include using DTDs, Schema, NamespaSAX, XPath, DOM, SAX, Data Models, XSLT, SVG, and SOAP, as well as services and the Semantic web. PR: CIS 136

CIS240 Internetworking Fundamentals (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to networking. Topics include basic concepts and terminology relating to LANs and WANs including: data communications, types of networks, networking models and theory, protocols, and equipment. There is a strong emphasis on the OSI Model. The material covered in this course is applicable to sections of the Network+ certification exam. Please note that this is not a review course for the Network+ certification exam. CR: CIS 221 or equivalent

CIS241 Routing Fundamentals (3-0-3)

This course covers the theory and application of routers to internetwork communications. There is an initial review of TCP/IP, Ethernet, the OSI model, network terminology, protocols, and standards. Primary emphasis is given to static routing and TCP/IP. Dynamic routing protocols are also introduced. Students will have the opportunity to work with simulator software to apply the concepts learned in class to a Cisco internetwork. PR: CIS 240 and CIS 110

CIS244 Introduction to Routing and Switching (3-0-3)

This course covers the theory and application of routers and switches to network and internetwork communications. Static and dynamic routing technologies are introduced, along with layer 2 switching and VLANs. Students will have the opportunity to work with both simulator software and actual hardware to apply the concepts learned in class. PR: CIS 240

CIS246 Data Structures (3-0-3)

Students are introduced to some commonly used data structures and their applications using C++. Topics include abstract data types, object-oriented programming, stacks, queues, linked lists, sorting, binary search trees, heaps, and hashing. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 134 or equivalent S

CIS247 Switching and Advanced Routing (3-0-3)

This course provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switched network. Students learn about the hierarchical network design model and how to select devices for each layer. The course explains how to configure a switch for basic functionality and how to implement virtual LANs, VTP, and Inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. Students will also learn how to implement and configure common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control and addressing services. PR: CIS 241

CIS250 Computer Organization (4-0-4)

Students are introduced to the structure and implementation of computer systems at the lower levels: the digital logic level, the microprogramming level, and the conventional machine language level. Students will be required to make use of computer facilities to complete programming projects. PR: CIS 134 and MAT 167 or equivalent F

CIS251 Switching and Advanced Routing (4-0-4)

This course provides a comprehensive, theoretical, and practical approach to learning the technologies and protocols needed to design and implement a converged switched network. The course covers the hierarchical network design model; how to select devices for each layer, how to configure a switch for basic functionality; and how to implement Virtual LANs, VTP, and Inter-VLAN routing in a converged network. Other topics include the implementation and configuration of common data link protocols and how to apply WAN security concepts, principles of traffic, access control and addressing services. PR: CIS 241

CIS256 Introduction to Systems Management (3-2-4)

This course introduces topics in managing server-based network operating systems, configurations, security, and troubleshooting. Students will have the opportunity to practice and implement techniques and strategies in class. Students will configure a server to provide file, print, and web services. PR: CIS 240

CIS257 Advanced Networking and Systems Management (3-3-4)

This course covers advanced topics in network communications and administration including server administration, monitoring and troubleshooting. Topics include advanced techniques ni file and printer sharing, email and web services. PR: CIS 256

CIS259 Computer Information Systems Internship (1-8-3)

This course provides the computer information systems/ computer science student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study and field work within selected business entities. Textbook theory and classroom experience are enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate computer related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled meetings with the instructor. There is a final report and oral presentation due at the end of the semester during final exam week. PR: CIS or Computer Science major with minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and permission of the department.

CIS262 Network Security (3-0-3)

This course provides instruction in the fundamentals of network and computer security. Topics include server and network hardening, threat assessment, protecting network infrastructure and services, physical security, business continuity and disaster recovery. PR: CIS 251

CIS263 Intro to Computer Forensics (3-0-3)

This course is designed to introduce students to topics necessary to initiate and complete a successful computer investigation. Students will set up a forensics lab, acquire the proper and necessary tools for a successful investigation, and conduct the investigation with subsequent digital analysis. The materials covered in this course are identical to the International Association of Computer Investigation Specialists (IACIS) and the Certified Forensic Computer Examiner (CFCE) Certification exam. PR: CIS 111 and CIS 225

CRJ113 Introduction to Criminal Justice (3-0-3)

This course provides the philosophical and historical background of the agencies that compose the criminal justice system. It focuses on the development of justice and law, crime and punishment, the administration of laws, the agencies' functions, career orientation and public policy. F, S

CRJ117 Police Organization and Supervision (3-0-3)

This is a detailed study of police organization, administration and supervision. This course emphasizes principles of organization, line staff relations, supervisory problems within police organization and supervisory techniques for effective police performance. Detailed explanations of discipline, leadership, motivation and performance appraisals will also be covered. S

CRJ131 Criminal Law (3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the study of substantive criminal law. Selected crimes most likely to be dealt with by the criminal justice professional are explored through discussion, where applicable, of the English Common Law precedents, general modern application and specific New York Penal Law. F

CRJ133 Criminology (3-0-3)

This course provides an etiology of crime and criminal behavior. The course delves into biological, psychological and sociological theories that examine arrest and conviction data. Analysis of criminal activity through an understanding of the theories is undertaken. S

CRJ135 Introduction to Security (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the various facets of modern security operations in a variety of settings. Security problems, both internal and external, and possible solutions will be explored for plant protection and industrial security, retail security and institutional security. S

CRJ143 Criminal Evidence and Procedure (3-0-3)

This course presents an in-depth analysis of the rules of criminal evidence. The process of the American criminal justice system will be examined and special emphasis will be placed on Constitutional limitations in the area of criminal evidence and the law of search and seizure. Topics also include concepts of evidence and rules governing its admissibility, theoretical and pragmatic considerations of substantive and procedural laws affecting arrest, and search and seizure. This course demonstrates the importance of case law at the state and federal levels and its impact on the administration of law. S

CRJ147 Terrorism and Public Security (3-0-3)

This introductory course investigates the criminal, economic, historical, political, psychological, and social roots of terrorist phenomenon. The course explores existing and potential terorist threats and how local, national, and global communities may counter these threats.

CRJ150 Airport Security and Management (3-0-3)

This course familiarizes students with the fundamental components of a typical commercial airport and its multi-level security requirements. In addition to a commercial airport's various support functions, the organizational structure, governing FAA regulations, inter-agency relationships and management challenges are examined. Security issues are presented in a post 9/11 environment to include scenario-based discussions and problem-solving situations.

CRJ152 Policing Theory and Practice I (3-0-3)

This course is designed to teach students the necessary theoretical background and practical skills to function as county and municipal level law enforcement officers. Topics reviewed in lecture and in applied exercises include administration of justice, basic law and procedures and patrol functions.

CRJ153 Policing Theory and Practice II (3-0-3)

This course continues the study of law enforcement begun in Policing Theory and Practice I. It is designed to teach students the necessary theoretical background and practical skills to function as county and municipal level law enforcement officers. Topics reviewed in lecture and in applied exercises include traffic procedures, investigation procedures, community relations, and supervised field training. PR: CRJ 152

CRJ196 CRJ Experimental (3-0-3)



CRJ215 Juvenile Delinquency (3-0-3)

This course offers an intensive study of the nature and extent of juvenile delinquency. It addresses the nature of youth crime and the critical issues of juvenile delinquency. The course provides students with a greater understanding of the present juvenile justice system including the biological, psychological and sociological approaches being administered in an attempts to reduce juvenile crime. F

CRJ217 Principles of Investigation (3-0-3)

This course offers an introduction to the basic principles and a detailed examination of specific offenses. The course focuses on the crime scene, physical evidence interviewing and interrogation, and the use of informers and confessions. The study of specific offenses focuses on the scientific approach and the methodology used in crime detection. F

CRJ219 Corrections (3-0-3)

This course is a detailed study of the history, theory and practice of probation, parole and correctional institutions. It will also explore punishment, rehabilitation, community-based corrections and capital punishment as they exist today. F

CRJ229 Community Based Corrections (3-0-3)

This course exposes the student to the concept of community corrections as compared to the more familiar institutional correctional settings. The course will deal with such programs as probation, parole, half- way houses, home detention and other alternatives to incarceration. Relevant law and both adult and juvenile systems will be examined in public and private programs at local, state and federal levels. S

CRJ230 Interpersonal Violence (3-0-3)

This course will provide a unique perspective on the issue of interpersonal violence concentrating on the public perception and criminal justice approach to sexual assaults and sexual offenders. An emphasis will be placed on charateristics and behavioral patterns of the offender and the crime itself. Particular attention will be given to the critical issues of victimology, rape typologies, stalking, domestic violence and criminal/constitutional law. Students will benefit from this course as it explores the etiology of sexually deviant behavior from both sociological and psychological approaches within the functioning of the criminal justice system. Students will learn to develop an informed analysis of sexual offenses, sexual offenders, the public perception and the handling of such offenders within the criminal justice system. PR: CRJ 113 or SOC 121

CRJ233 Current Issues in Criminal Justice (3-0-3)

This course is designed to allow study and discussion of those relevant issues of most current concern affecting components of the criminal justice system. Such issues as hiring practices, community relations, court decisions, and the impact of the mass media may be explored in relationship to the administration of justice in America. F

CRJ237 Criminal Justice Internship (3-0-3)

This is a planned practicum of observation, study and work within selected criminal justice agencies designed to broaden the student's educational experience through exposure to the practical environment of such agencies. The student's field work will be supplemented by periodic seminars with the course instructor. PR: Criminal Justice major, completion of 30 credit hours with a 2.5 G.P.A., and permission of the department S

DRA123 Introduction to the Theatre (3-0-3)

This course introduces the student to the essential elements of theatre. It explores the historical theatre and contemporary production processes, encompassing the artistic, craft, and business practices of the theatre. This course grounds aesthetic and articstic movement and principles in the larger culture and examines the interactions between audience and performance.

DRA133 Theatre Workshop (2-2-3)

This course focuses on direct student participation in the creation, design, rehearsal, production and performance of short, in-process theatrical works.

DRA143 History of Western Theatre (3-0-3)

This course will study the evolution of the Western theatre, from its possible precursors in religious and civic practices in the ancient world to the present day. This course will specifically concentrate on the evolutions of playwrighting, theatrical architecture, performance style and technique, spectacle (including scenery, costumes, special effects and lighting), dramatic theory and criticism and the relationship between the societies studied and their theatres. S

DRA150 Basic Acting (2-2-3)

This course investigates a broad range of modern and contemporary theories, ideologies, techniques, and processes in the field of stage acting. Students will apply those concepts to in-class exercises, to scene study, and to performances. Students will use those concepts to begin to develop the physical, vocal, and imaginative skills of the actor.

DRA181 Theatre in London (2-2-3)

This course delivers an overview of theatre in contemporary London. After an on-campus and/or Internet introductory seminar, students will travel to London for approximately two weeks. They will develop understanding of the contemporary London theatrical and dramatic scenes through a series of tours, performances, guest lectures, and/or demonstrations. Historical perspective will be added through lectures and theatrical tours. Cross-cultural perspectives will be added by lectures, tours of gardens, museums, monuments, libraries, and individually selected activities and excursions. Students will present final projects on the SCCC campus or via the Internet after their return from London.

DRA240 Rehearsal and Production I (1-5-3)

Rehearsal and Production I is designed to introduce and develop students' performance, management and/or technical skills through participation in productions. The course will provide entry level instruction in appropriate performance, management and technical skills, utilizing production processes to expand students' skill levels. Skills and techniques will be honed in professionally supervised practice sessions. The course will culminate in a fully staged theatrical production open to the general public.

DRA242 Rehearsal and Production II (1-5-3)

Rehearsal and Production II is designed to further develop students' performance, management and/or technical skills through participation in productions. The course will provide students with active roles in the areas of performance, management and technical skills. Skills and techniques will be honed in professionally supervised practice sessions. The course will culminate in a fully staged theatrical production open to the general public. PR: DRA 240 and permission of the department

DRA244 Rehearsal and Production III (1-5-3)

In Rehearsal and Production III, students take the responsibility for developing expertise and leadership in one area of theatrical production, either performance, direction, design, stage management, house management or technical production. They will hone their skills in professionally supervised practice sessions. The course will culminate in a fully staged theatrical production open to the general public. PR: DRA 240 or 242 and permission of instructor

DRA265 Theatre Arts Internship (3-0-3)

This course provides the student with a planned and supervised work experience in a professional theatrical setting. Each individually planned and designed experience introduces the work and culture of a specific theatre field, and focuses on developing appropriate skill sets. It requries 8 hours of classroom instruction and a minimum of 120 hours of field work. PR: DRA 123 and/or permission of the department

ECH121 Introduction to Early Childhood (3-0-3)

This course examines the fundamental philosophies of early childhood education from historical perspective. This course emphasizes quality early childhood programming and its significance in educating children birth through eight years of age. This course allows students to reflect upon their role as potential teachers and advocates for children while identifying how service learning experiences are integrated in early childhood education. Ten observation hours are required. This course requires that students complete the following documentation by Week 4: 1) Medical consent to work with children and a negative TB test, 2) Notarized criminal conviction statement, and 3) Signed agreement to uphold the National Association of Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Code of Ethics and SCCC ECH Professional Behaviors. F

ECH123 Curricular Methods I and Assessment (3-0-3)

This course focuses on curriculum development and assessment in early childhood education. It introduces students to the important frameworks for planning, implementing, and evaluating curricula as it impacts child development and the various content areas. In-depth studies of developmentally appropriate curriculum models provide emphasis on the methods and strategies that inform the development of meaningful and relevant curriculum. Assessment driven learning, environment and curriculum development is applied. Students spend a minimum of ten hours observing in an early childhood environment.

ECH131 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar I (1-8-4)

This course allows students the opportunity for direct practical teaching and learning in early childhood education within community agencies and/or the SCCC Early Childhood Program Laboratory Preschool. Additionally, in a seminar setting, students reflect on and share their experiences. Students will spend eight to ten hours per week in their field placement to accumulate a minimum of 130 hours. PR: ECH 121 and ECH 123

ECH220 Engendering Creativity: Arts in the Classroom (3-0-3)

This course is an exploration of creative expression with an emphasis placed on the importance of the arts in every child's education. As students unlock their own creative potential, they also become skilled at using methods and techniques that encourage creative development in young children. Students reflect on aesthetics while analyzing the movements and techniques of the visual arts and the genres and elements of music. Students then apply their understanding by presenting art, music, and drama activities to young children. Throughout the semester, students develop an art and music portfolio.

ECH223 Curricular Methods II and Development of Inquiry Skills (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the early developmental abilities of children ages birth to eight years in social studies, math and science. Sensory, preoperational and concrete operational thought processes of conservation, seriation, observation, comparison, classification, and number concepts will be examined through the use of concrete social studies, math, and science materials and experiences that foster student quantitative and analytical thinking. The course requires students to implement developmentally appropriate social students, math, and science activities which address diversity in children's learning styles. A service learning experience is required. PR: ECH 123

ECH225 Fostering Emergent Literacy (4-0-4)

The course examines the development of literacy skills in children ages birth to 8 years. Multiple opportunities to recognize the developmental stages in literacy acquisition, to indentify factors that influence literacy development, and to discuss how to design and implement a literacy program are provided. Genre of literature, curricular themes, and resources for children of culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds are empasized. Guidelines for the design and implementation of literature- based activities are applied throughout the course. Students will observe for a minimum of 15 hours in an early childhood literacy environment.

ECH227 Guidance of Young Children (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the early developmental abilities of children ages birth to eight years and approriate utilization of guidance strategies to enhance children's self esteem and consequently increase children's self- discipline skills. The correlation between children's environments and behaviors will be researched. The importance of play, social interactions, and family expectations on children's development will be analyzed.

ECH231 Early Childhood Field Instruction and Seminar II (1-8-4)

This course allows students the opportunity for direct practical teaching and learning in early childhood education within community agencies or the SCCC Early Childhood Program Laboratory Preschool. The course requires students to reflect on and share their experiences in a seminar setting. The course also requires students to spend eight to ten hours per week in their field placement to accumulate a minimum of 130 hours. A service learning implementation is required. PR: ECH 131 F

ECH252 Care of Infants and Toddlers (3-0-3)

This course examines infant and toddler development with an emphasis on the importance of the first thirty-six months in relation to human development. Attachment, early brain research and developmentally approriate practices will be emphasized as critical factors which impact a caregiver's role in meeting individual children's needs. Students complete ten hours of observational field work in this course.

ECH255 Administration of Early Childhood Programs (3-0-3)

This course provides administrative management training in the field of Early Childhood Education. This course addresses issues and techniques involved in the set-up, organization and administration of early childhood environments. Focus is placed on the initiation and maintenance of an early childhood program which includes the investigation and application of pertinent skills necessary to perform as an effective and competent program director. Ten hours of field work will be completed in this course.

ECH260 ECH Portfolio Seminar (1-0-1)

This capstone seminar is intended for ECH majors who are about to graduate from their Early Childhood Program. Knowledge and skills acquired in the program are reviewed and analyzed to demonstrate their proficiency in a pre-professional portfolio. Opportunity is provided for technical assistance on an individual basis. Each student assembles a portfolio as a summative experience to be presented to a professional review team. PR: Permission of the Department

ECO211 Introduction to Economics (3-0-3)

This course provides an overview of microeconomic and macroeconomic issues and an understanding of the economic choices that individuals, firms, and governments face. It also introduces the concept of scarcity and the working process of a market economic system. Further, this course examines the different market structures, the role of the firm and the impact of government intervention on markets. Finally, this course discusses the meaning and computation of national income, inflation, unemployment, economic growth, international trade, and the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the economy. F, S

ECO221 Principles of Macroeconomics (3-0-3)

This course provides an analytical framework for the understanding of the economy at the national level. This course will also analyze the purpose and functions of national income accounting, the components of Gross Domestic Product, the determinants of long run economic growth, the causes and costs of inflation and unemployment. In addition, this course will cover the economic impacts of fiscal and monetary policies and the differences between short run and long run macroeconomic aspects of the economy. Finally, this course will examine the importance of the U.S. financial system, the macroeconomic effects of international trade and the determination of interest and exchange rates. F,S

ECO223 Principles of Microeconomics (3-0-3)

This course develops an analytical framework for the understanding of the theory of markets, including the decision-making process in businesses, the impact of technological advances on markets and the functioning of the four different market structures. This course will also provide a closer look at the interactions of individual households, business firms and governments in the marketplace. Finally, this course will discuss economic issues related to the well-being of market participants, the tradeoffs between equity and efficiency, the economics of taxation and subsidies, the economics of healthcare, the economics of poverty and income inequality, labor market issues and the basis of free trade. F, S

ELT110 Circuits for Digital Systems I (3-3-4)

This course is an introduction to direct current (DC) circuits. Digital systems and circuits using logical gates will also be studied. Basic DC circuits entails a study of Ohm's Law and use of the law to theoretically predict measured voltages, currents, resistances and power through resistors connected in series, parallel and series-parallel circuits. This course uses voltmeters, ammeters, ohmmeters, multimeters, and oscilloscopes for measurement and troubleshooting. PR: MAT 128 or higher S

ELT118 Digital Logic (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of number systems, Boolean algebra, logic gates, codes, binary arithmetic and digital circuits using Integrated Circuit Technology.

ELT121 Circuits for Digital Systems II (3-3-4)

This course is a continuation of circuits including AC circuits as applicable to digital systems and controls. Basic AC circuits are covered, along with single and 3-phase AC power and distribution. Series and parallel RLC circuits are covered, along with the use of an oscilloscope in troubleshooting and measurement. Digital systems are covered, with the examination of three state busses and the chips needed to interface with them in personal computer applications. PR: ELT 110, MAT 129 F

ELT123 Eletrical Schematics (2-0-2)

This course offers a broad overview of schematics and diagrams. Topics include electrical symbols, component identification, Block diagrams, pictorial diagrams, three- dimensional drawings, and print reading. PR: ELT 121 (Electrical Circuits II)

ELT230 Electronics (4-3-5)

This course is an introduction to electronics as applied to digital systems and controls. DC power supplies, zener diodes, switching transistors and linear and non-linear operational amplifier circuits are covered. The course stresses design and prototyping of circuits used in control systems and measurement. PR: MAT 129, ELT 110, ELT 121 F

ELT231 Electronics (3-3-4)

This course is an introduction to the electronic building blocks that are used in all modern silicon based integrated circuitry. Component operations, applications, and the use and troubleshooting of these components is covered. Topics include an overview of semiconductor materials and P-N junction, various diodes (rectifier, switching, zener) and their uses, and overview of basic power supply circuits and uses, the operation and use of mos an cmos field-effect transistors, inverting and non-inverting operational amplifiers and their use in analog and digital applications, LC and RC swine-wave oscillators and crystal oscillators, silicon rectified controller SCRs), diac and triac thyristors, and optoelectronics. PR: ELT 121 (Electrical Circuits II)

ELT241 Routing (3-0-3)

This course covers the application of routers to internetwork communications. After a brief review of TCP/IP and the OSI model, the course covers network layer addressing, bridging, static and dynamic routing, router protocols including RIP, OSPF, and SNMP. Some Netware and Appletalk protocols are introduced, and a brief introduction to layer two and three switching is presented. Students will have the opportunity to work with NORTEL ARN series routers. PR: CIS 240, ELT 120 S

ELT256 Process Control and Instrumentation (3-3-4)

This course is an introduction to process control fundamentals and the application of digital controllers in a process environment. Analog and digital signal conditioning interfacing stand-alone computers using signal processing software, and the basics of automatic process control are studied. The course will emphasize the application of Programmable Logical Devices (PLD) and the use of Programmable Logic Controllers (PLCs). PR: ELT 231 CR: MAT 129 S

ELT261 Programmable Logic Controls (3-3-4)

This course is an introduction to the Logic and Programming of Logical Devices used in system controls. The course covers Binary, Octal and Hexadecimal number systems and introduces the elements of Assembly Programming, Logical gates, and the operations of Boolean algebra using standard digital waveforms. This course also includes Shift Registers and Counters, Adders and triggering clocks using specialized software, Digital-to-Analog conversion methodology, decoders and multiplexers. PR: CIS 221, ELT 110 CR: MAT 129

ELT270 Power Electronics (3-0-3)

This course introduces linear integrated power amplifiers, switches, and regulators. Component operations and application and the use and troubleshooting of these components is covered. Topics include power parameter calculations, principles of power electronics prototype and printed circuit board (pcb) layout, linear integrated circuit power amplifiers for intermediate audio signal amplification, discrete linear power amplifiers for signals with higher power requirements, power switches, switching power, thyristor uses in commercial power line applications, power conversion, and permanent magnet motor drivers. PR: ELT 231

EMS210 Basic EMT (2-7-4)

This course is designed to meet New York State Health Department (Bureau of Emergency Health Services) requirements for Emergency Medical Technician training. This course is updated yearly to include materials appropriate for EMT training as included in the New York State EMS program CFR/EMT/AEMT student manual. The course will adhere to the SCCC/REMO AMT Sponsor's agreement and all current New York State regulations for EMT training, including requirements for class time and instructor certification. Students should note that some Saturday sessions are required in addition to regularly scheduled class hours. PR: All students must be at least 18 years old. F,S

EMS220 Selected Topics in EMT (2-3-3)

This course is designed to meet New York State Health Department (Bureau of Emergency Health Services) requirements for EMT Refresher. New laws and policies will be discussed, as well as new technology appropriate to the course which has been introduced during the past three years. The course will adhere to the SCCC/ REMO AMT Sponsor's Agreement and all current New York State regulations for EMT-B training, including requirements for class time and instructor certification. PR: A student may have a current EMT card that will expire in less than 18 months; a student who was certified as a NYS Emergency Medical Technician may have a lapsed certification; a student who has previously failed the Final Practical Skills Exam within one year or has failed the state written certifying exam after a second attempt may enroll in the refresher course. Proof of failure must be provided to the CIC by the student; a student who has received written permission from the Bureau of EMS to enroll in an EMT-B refresher course as a result of filing for reciprocity based on EMT training from another state. The student must submit the letter which was provided from the Bureau of EMS as proof of eligibility for enrolling in the refresher. F, S

EMS999 EMS Elective (4-0-4)



ENG123 College Composition (3-0-3)

This course provides a foundation in academic discourse by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing; an oral presentation is required. PR: Exemption from placement testing as defined by the Academic Code or successful completion of CSS 127

ENG124 Literature & Writing (3-0-3)

This course encourages students to use writing to explore the ways in which literature functions as an art form. Writing and research techniques introduced in ENG 123 College Composition are strengthened and refined. PR: ENG 123

ENG200 Introduction to Creative Writing (3-0-3)

Students will learn the essential principles, strategies, and methods of creative writing and will acquire a foundation in the skills necessary to master this art. The emphasis will be on the writing of short fiction, but opportunities will be provided to explore poetry, drama, screenwriting, the novel, and the essay. Students will also learn how to go about getting their work published. PR: ENG 123 CR: ENG 124

ENG205 Writing Poetry (3-0-3)

This course focuses on developing students' abilities to write, revise, and analyze poetry. It is primarily conducted as a workshop: students write and revise their own poetry, as well as give oral feedback and produce written critiques of their peers' poems. In addition, the course introduces students to a variety of poetic forms and asks them to write poetry in these forms. It also introduces them to theories of free verse and to studies of the poetic line and asks them to write their own free verse. The course also includes an oral component: students practice reading their own and others' poems to the class. Last, the class introduces students to opportunities for performing and publishing their poetry. PR: ENG 123

ENG211 Technical and Professional Writing (3-0-3)

This course applies the principles of effective writing to the specific forms of professional and technical writing. It emphasizes designing texts and oral reports for professional audiences after analyzing the needs and values of those audiences. PR: ENG 123 College Composition

ENG295 English Experimental Course (4-0-4)



ENG296 English Experimental (3-0-3)



ENV100 Introduction to Environmental Science (3-0-3)

This one-semester course introduces students to environmental concepts and issues. The course covers environmental issues and controversies from ecological, biological, social, economic, ethical and governmental policy positions. In addition, the course emphasis is placed on the tools and techniques needed to understand and analyze environmental topics such as energy, solid waste, food production, resource depletion, air and water issues and global climate change. PR: High School Algebra or MAT 128

ENV195 Intro to Oceanography (6-3-6)

This course is designed to give the student a broad multidisciplinary survey of the physical, chemical, geological, and biological processes of the world's oceans. This course provides the conceptual framework, factual knowledge and analytical skills to deal with critical topics in oceanography, such as impact of ocean currents on weather and storm systems, wave dynamics and shore erosion, tides and sea-level rise flooding, biodiversity and economic importance of estuaries, coral reefs, and global climate change. PR: MAT 095 or equivalent

ENV203 General Ecology (3-3-4)

Through lecture and laboratory experiences this course focuses on the study of major ecological principles including: population and community biology, competition and predation, physiological ecology and adaptations, ecosystems, nutrient cycles, energy flow, and ecological succession. The ecological basis of contemporary environmental problems is examined and related to human activities. Quantitative perspectives and analysis will be used throughout. PR: BIO 142 and CHM 122, or equivalent

ENV205 The Environment and Social Issues (3-0-3)

This course is designed to provide a multidisciplinary introduction to the understanding of social issues that impact humans and their relationship to the environment as well as their participation in decision making roles that lead to environmental problem solving. The course will concentrate on: varying factors that influence individual and cultural differences in identification and perception of environmental issues, the social processes involved in addressing the identified environmental problems, and introductory techniques for the integration of different human values and cultural processes into environmental planning and management strategies. PR: BIO 142 and CHM 122, or equivalent

ENV260 Subtropical Coastal and Marine Ecology (4-0-4)

This course focuses on the current environmental and ecological issues of a subtropical ecosystem (Indian River Lagoon). The lectures and field experiences will emphasize the application of basic ecological principles to life in the coastal ecosystem, then focus on characteristics of marine and coastal habitats and the groups of organisms that occur there. The course will include physical, chemical and biological aspects of these salt/fresh-water environments, and will explore several different marine ecosystems: reefs, seagrass beds, salt water marshes, mangrove, and cypress swamps. Students will analyze the role of human impact on these environments, spending a maximum amount of time in the field. Through direct observations, species collection, water analysis, and lecture the students will develop an understanding of how such issues as food production, energy consumption, population growth, greenhouse effect, all impact upon these environments, their usage and quality. The laboratory portion of the course will involve two weeks of intensive field work at Harbor Branch Oceanographic Institute in Florida. There is a separate field trip cost, which will include air fare, transportation, room and board, and site costs. Because the field experience occurs after the May Commencement, graduating students may not use this course to meet graduation requirements. Graduating students may take this course if a) they are willing to miss Commencement and b) they meet all graduation requirements without this course. Graduates may also choose to postpone graduation until the following semester. PR: One year of college biology or chemistry or consent of Department

ETH221 Professional and Applied Ethics (1-0-1)

This course provides exposure to leading ethical theories as well as an opportunity to employ these principles. Aided by viewing videotaped, dramatized scenarios, the reasons advanced for acting ethically and the excuses given for not acting ethically will be studied. The consequences of freedom and personal responsibility will be explored, as will the ability to recognize ethical issues. F,S

ETH999 Ethics Elective (0-0-3)



FPT112 Principles of Emergency Services (3-0-3)

This is an introductory course that surveys the historical development of fire protection, organizational structure of fire agencies, and the range of issues and topics related to fire protectin. This course meets United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum.

FPT115 Hazardous Materials I (3-0-3)

This course focuses on the nature of hazardous materials (HazMat) and the role of First Responders in prevention, mitigation, and remediation of incidents. Hazardous materials risk is presented within the context of First Responder operations. This course fully integrates National Incident Management (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) protocols.

FPT116 Hazardous Materials II (3-0-3)

A continuation of Hazardous Materials I, course content stresses recognition of potentially hazardous situations, protocols of organized response, and regulatory guidelines. Hazardous materials response is presented within the context of First Responder operations. Specific attention is placed on the different response protocols needed for remediation of weapons of mass destruction events and other sources of HazMat situations resulting from natural disasters, accidents, negligence and criminal activities. This course fully integrates National Incident Management System (NIMS) and Incident Command System (ICS) protocols. PR: FPT 115

FPT120 Building Construction for Fire Protection (3-0-3)

This course provides the components of building construction that relate to fire and life safety. The focus of this course is on firefighter safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, pre-planning fire operations, and operating at emergencies.

FPT131 Fire Prevention (3-0-3)

This course provides fundamental information regarding the history of fire prevention, organizations and operation of a fire prevention bureau, use of fire codes, identification and correction of fire hazards, and the relationships of fire prevention with built-in fire protection systems, fire investigation, and fire and life safety education. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements.

FPT135 Fire Administration (3-0-3)

This course focuses on organization, personnel management distribution of equipment, records and fire safety as they pertain to the fire service. Techniques for successful and efficient fire service operations are covered in this course. These topics include communications and fire alarm systems, legal aspects of fire prevention, fire investigation and the recording and evaluation of fire data for statistical purposes.

FPT137 Fire Protection Systems (3-0-3)

This course provides information relating to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements.

FPT213 Hydraulics and Equipment I (3-0-3)

This course focuses on incompressible fluids, principles of fluid statics and dynamics, fluid flow, pipe and hose or head losses, and pump systems operations. Sprinkler and standpipe systems and other special systems are covered. PR: MAT 128 or equivalent

FPT215 Fire Investigation (3-0-3)

This course emphasizes the following subjects as they individually relate to fire investigations: elements of fire, combustion properties of fuel, pyrolysis, burn patterns, ignition sources and explosions. A review of methods of interviewing, report writing, rules of evidence, forensic lab procedures, model arson law and NYS arson law is included. PR: May require New York State Police identification and/or registration

FPT216 Fire Protection Hydraulics and Water Supply (3-0-3)

This course provides a foundation of theoretical knowledge in order to understand the principles of the use of water in fire protection and apply hydraulic principles to analyze and to solve water supply problems. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements. PR: MAT 128

FPT219 Fire Behavior and Combustion (3-0-3)

This course explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and how they are controlled. This course meets the United States Fire Administration, Fire and Emergency Services in Higher Education (FESHE) model associate degree curriculum requirements.

FPT237 Industrial Fire Protection (3-0-3)

Provides an introduction to the field of industrial fire protection and focuses on the topics of hazard control, special hazards and protection, fire protection equipment, and systems and handling of emergencies.

FPT250 Fire Protection Internship (3-0-3)

This course provides the fire protection technology student with the opportunity to participate in a planned, professional experience of observation, study, and field work within selected areas of the fire protection profession. These areas include but are not limited to: municipal fire departments, state or local fire protection agencies, industrial fire safety organizations, and installers of fire protection systems. Textbook theory and classroom experience are enhanced as the student works in an appropriately supervised setting. The field study will specifically incorporate fire protection, prevention, or suppression related assignments. All field work will be supplemented by regularly scheduled seminars with the instructor. PR: FPT major with 30 completed credits, minimum overall GPA of 2.5, FPT course in area of internship, and permission of the department.

FPT999 Fire Elective (4-0-4)



FSS120 Freshman Success Seminar (1-0-1)

The First Year Success Seminar is an orientation course designed to enhance the success of first-year college students by introducing such topics as time management, learning styles, classroom expectations, support services and resources, major/career planning, stress management, and personal wellness.

FRE121 Elementary French I (3-0-3)

This course provides an introduction to the French language through the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. It also examines the cultures of French- speaking people throughout the world. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab. Students are required to complete five documented hours of lab work outside of class.

FRE122 Elementary French II (3-0-3)

The second half of the one-year sequence in Elementary French continues the development of listening, speaking, reading, and writing skills. The course continues to provide an understanding of the civilization, culture and customs of French-speaking people in multiple countries. Classroom instruction is supplemented with activities in the language lab. Students are required to complete five documented hours of lab work outside of class. PR: FRE 121 or its equivalent

FRE222 Intermediate French I (3-0-3)

This course provides an extensive review of French grammar, and concentrates on helping students improve their vocabulary, conversational fluency and reading skills through the discussion of selected readings in French. Classroom discussions on the readings and French culture are held primarily in French. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language lab is required per term. PR: FRE 122 or permission of the instructor

FRE224 Intermediate French II (3-0-3)

A continuation of Intermediate French I, this course completes the review of French grammar and provides more reading of French literature and non-fictional prose. Classroom discussions in French are held on the readings and on French customs and culture. A minimum of five hours of additional work in the language lab is required per term. PR: FRE 222 or permission of the instructor

GHY121 Physical Geography (3-0-3)

This is a one-semester, non-lab science course in physical geography. Weather elements and climate characteristics are examined. Detailed consideration is given to each climate region, the location of that region, and the causes for that climate. Geologic factors that shape land forms are examined. Consideration is given to the flora and fauna of each climate region, including the causes for the distribution of these biologic assemblages. A strong emphasis is placed on teaching the locations of various geographic features. F

GHY123 Population Geography (3-0-3)

This course explores the general principles of human and cultural geography. Spatial and ecological relationships are examined to obtain a perspctive for contemporary world patterns. Special consideration is given to the nature and characteristics of areas to which Americans frequently travel as well as the impact of our travels. S Credit in GHY 123 does not satisfy a science requirement.

GEO143 Physical Geology (3-3-4)

This is the first part of a two-course sequence introducing students to the nature, processes and formation of Earth's material and the majors features of the earth's crust and topography. This course will consider the mineralogy of the rocks, different rock types and structures. Detailed consideration will be given to the internal processes that shape the earth's surface, including plate tectonics, igneous activities, weathering, erosion and deposition and earthquakes. PR: Two years of high school science and mathematics. F

GEO145 Surface Geology (3-3-4)

This is the second part of a two-semester sequence introducing students to the features of the earth's crust and topography. This course will consider the various geologic agents and processes that produce, shape and modify the surface environment. Detailed consideration will be given to the rise and decay of mountains, moving water, glaciers, deserts, shorelines and oceans as well as comparative planetary geology with other bodies in the Solar System. PR: Two years of high school science and mathematics. NOTE: Students using Geology as a lab science sequence are advised to take GEO 143 before GEO 145. Either course may be taken alone as a single lab science elective. S

GER999 German Elective (3-0-3)



HEA100 Medical Terminology (3-0-3)

This course provides students with the core knowledge and terminology used in the medical and healthcare-related professions to describe the organ systems of the human body and to understand diagnoses, therapies, drug classification and the basics of pharmacology. The course also covers the application of medical terminology in the context of a medical record management environment.

HEA101 Healthcare Ethics & Law (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to standards of ethical practice in healthcare. The legal requirements and regulations and their application and use in decision making in healthcare are covered. There is an emphasis on government regulations regarding the handling of patient information and patient treatment, as well as examination of professional ethical dilemmas.

HIM110 Introduction to Healthcare Information Systems (3-0-3)

This course provides students with an introduction to the significant changes and trends in the Health Information Management profession. The course covers healthcare information systems, career paths within the profession, and clinical data management.

HIM112 Electronic Healthcare Delivery (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to an integrated approach to Practice Management and the Electronic Health Record (EHR). The course provides practical experience using simulated clinical activities provided by Medisoft Clinical Applications software. CR: HIM 110

HIM201 Healthcare Billing and Reimbursement (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the various healthcare reimbursement systems, reimbursement methodologies and payment processes. The relationship between coding systems, insurance claims and reimbursement is emphasized. Managing the billing cycle and resolving issues with insurance claims are covered. PR: HIM 112

HIM202 Current Procedures in Terminology (3-2-4)

This course introduces students to physician services coding, billing and data quality procedures. Students will learn to read, interpret and code physician office documentation. Special emphasis is placed on assigning Evaluation and Management (E/M) codes, outpatient diagnostic coding guidelines, Current Procedural Terminology (CPT), and Health Care Financing Administration Common Procedure Coding System (HCPCS) codes. PR: BIO 112, HEA 100, HIM 110, and HIM 112 CR: HIM 201, HIM 203

HIM203 ICD Coding Systems and Lab (3-2-4)

This course introduces students to disease and operation classification using the International Classification of Disease, (ICD-9-CM and ICD-10-CM). The course covers diagnosis-related groups and their relationship to coding, the historical development of the International Classification of Disease, and various nomenclature and classification systems. The course will require students to differentiate between the various abstracting methods used to collect patient data. PR: HEA 100, HIM 110 and HIM 112 CR: HIM 201, HIM 202

HIM204 Professional Internship Experience (1-8-3)

This course is a supervised clinical practice experience in a healthcare setting. The course provides students with experience performing the coding of patient health records including application of coding systems and the use of coding software. A minimum of 96 hours in the clinical experience, which may be scheduled over a six to 12 week period, as determined by the placement site, is required. Attendance at a weekly seminar that offers professional development activities and involves the use of internship software to prepare for career entry is also required. PR: HEA 100, HEA 101, HIM 110, HIM 112, HIM 201, HIM 202 and HIM 203

HSC100 Introduction to the Health Professions (1-0-1)

This course is designed to enhance the success of first- year students who are interested in a career in a health- related profession. It will assist students in making informed career choices by exposing them to a variety of health professions and the process necessary to become a health care professional. Also, students will be introduced to the tools and skills needed to become a successful college student, such as time management, learning styles, classroom expectations, support services, and orientation to the campus.

HSC999 Health Prof Elect (0-0-4)



HIS125 Western Civilization to 1715 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the development of Western Civilization from ancient times to 1715. It focuses in particular on political, cultural, social, and economic aspects fo the history of the West and relates these features to those of other regions of the world during the same period.

HIS127 Western Civilization Since 1715 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the development of Western Civilization since 1715. It focuses in particular on economic, political, social, and cultural aspects of the history of the West and relates these features to those of other regions of the world during the same period. F,S

HIS130 Introduction to Black History in the United States (3-0-3)

This course is an overview of Black history and culture in America. It examines a broad range of experiences from the first documented arrival of Blacks in colonial America in 1619 to the present. PR: Any college-level history course

HIS227 American History to 1877 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to American history from the pre-Columbian period to Reconstruction. It covers political, economical, social, and cultural forces that have shaped the evolving American nation and its interactions with the world during this time. F,S

HIS229 American History Since 1877 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to key events, people, and ideas in American history from the Reconstruction period to the recent past. It focuses on diverse political, economic, social, and cultural forces that have shaped the American nation and its interactions with the rest of the world during this time. It also explores the methods and skills historians use to reconstruct the past.

HIS231 Introduction to Russian History (3-0-3)

This course surveys the history of Russia and related areas from the earliest times to the present. It emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural developments. It includes the geographical areas of present-day Russia, Ukraine, Belarus, and other areas of significant Russian influence, such as the imperial conquests and Soviet Republics of Central Asia, the Caucasus, and the Baltic States. It also focuses on Russian relations with European and other world powers, as well as ethnic Russian interaction with other ethnicities that are or have historically been part of the Russian/Soviet state.

HIS232 World Civilizations to 1700 (3-0-3)

This course surveys world civilizations from ancient times to about 1700. It emphasizes political, economical, social, and cultural developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. The course explores the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities.

HIS233 History of Women and Gender in the United States (3-0-3)

This course uses the lens of women's and gender history from the colonial period to the recent past to survey major themes in the development of American civilization. It focuses on variables such as race, class, sexual orientation and national origin, and how they impacted the way in which women understood their lives and had access to opportunity. It also covers individuals who stand out as heroines and "firsts," and explores how gender has shaped the experiences of all Americans. PR: Any college-level history course or permission of instructor

HIS234 World Civilizations Since 1700 (3-0-3)

This course surveys world civilizations from about 1700. It emphasizes political, cultural, economic, and social developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, and the Americas. The course explores the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities.

HIS237 Introduction to Chinese History (3-0-3)

This course surveys the history of China and related areas from the earliest times to the present. It emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural deveopments. It also focuses on Chinese relations with European and other world powers, as well as ethnic Chinese interaction with other ethnicities that are or have historically been part of a Chinese state.

HIS241 European Witch Trials (3-0-3)

This course surveys the history of the persecution of accused witches from the Middle Ages through the Early Modern era in Europe, and including New England. The focus is on the anthropological, religious, legal, political and socio-economic contexts in which beliefs about magic and witches arose and were widely accepted. Attention is given to regional variations in witch beliefs and trial procedures. The course also surveys the growth of skepticism, toleration, and the gradual decline of witch persecution to the end of the seventeenth century. PR: HIS 125 or HIS 232

HIS243 The Viking World (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the history and culture of the Vikings and associated peoples, both in their Scandinavian homelands and abroad in the British Isles, Contenental Europe, Russia, and North America. The course starts with prehistory and concludes around the 12th century. The course focuses on political, economic, and cultural aspects of Viking-Era Scandinavian societies, including skaldic poetry and saga literature. It also focuses on the interrelations and mutual influences of these societies with neighboring peoples.

HIS296 History Experimental (3-0-3)



HON122 Honors Intro to E-Portfolios (1-0-1)

This course introduces students to the concepts and implementation of e-portfolios and requires them to develop one that may serve as a model for their program-based portfolios. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Concentration

HON123 Honors College Composition (3-0-3)

This course provides a foundation in academic discourse by developing effective communication skills with an emphasis on expository writing, argumentation, professional communication strategies, visual rhetoric, and service learning. In addition, the course implements e-portfolios and requires students to develop an e-portfolio that may serve as a model for their program-based portfolio that may serve as a model PR: Matriculation into the Honors Concentration

HON124 Honors English (3-0-3)

This course is an introduction to literary genres, analysis, and criticism. Students analyze and interpret poetry; fiction, including a novel; drama; and literary criticism. They write critically about these genres. Credit will not be given for both HON 124 and ENG 124. PR: ENG/HON 123 and meets criteria for Honors Concentration

HON125 Honors Western Civ to 1715 (3-0-3)

This course introduces students to the development of Western civilization from ancient times to 1715. It focuses on political, cultural, social, and economic aspects fo the history of the West and relates these features to those of other regions of the world during the same period. The course includes significant exposure to primary sources, including the canon of philosophical, literary, artistic, and other material products of Western civilization, and requires students to inerpret these critically, using creative scholarly research. It also introduces students to historical thinking and methodology. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Program

HON144 The Shaping of the Modern World (3-0-3)

This course is a survey of the major cultural, intellectual, political, economic and social forces that have shaped the modern world since the middle of the 17th century. In addition to the general survey of modern world history, each student will select, with the assistance of the instructor, a theme applicable to the time period encompassed by the course for focused study under the instructor's guidance. Credit may be earned for both HIS 127 and HON 144. PR: Consent of department

HON234 Honors World Civ since 1700 (3-0-3)

This course surveys world civilizations since about 1700. It emphasizes political, economic, social, and cultural developments in East and South Asia, the Middle East, Europe, Africa, Ociania, and the Americas. It explores the unique experiences of individual civilizations as well as their global interactions and commonalities. It includes significant exposure to primary sources, including the canon of world literature, and requires students to interpret these critically, using creative scholarly research. It also introduces students to historical thinking and methodology. PR: Matriculation into the Honors Program

HON244 Topics in Literary Classics